Yoo Hoo, Elizabeth

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by ~Tullymoor~, Jun 22, 2005.

  1. ~Tullymoor~

    ~Tullymoor~ Junior Member

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    Can you please "talk me through" the killing and dressing of home grown poultry. I have noone to show me and can find no destructions. :D
    Thanks.
    PS Your place/life sounds like paradise.
     
  2. baringapark

    baringapark Junior Member

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    Hi there

    I keep the feed away from the chooks to be killed for 8-12 hours before they are to be 'done' ie overnight.

    I put a pot of water on to boil, either on the stove if I am only doing a couple or build a campfire if doing more (to keep water hot between dunkings.

    I catch my chook (good idea to have them in a cage/pen overnight if they are not friendly to catch...they can be tough to eat if too stressed from being chased before slaughter).

    Hold chook by the legs with head on chopping block. I chop off the head with an axe. Hold it close to the head of the axe, doesn't require a lot of force.

    Then I hang them in a tree with some string to bleed while I chop off the rest of the heads (of the other chooks I am doing that morning).

    Plunge chook into just boiled water. I count to about 8 for the first chook, wiggle him around in the water. Place chook in plastic bag or feed sack to steam for a few minutes...makes the feathers easier to pluck. Don't let them get too cold as it is easier to pluck a warm chook. Try not to cook the skin while plunging in the water. If feathers don't come out easily they need a longer bath.

    Pluck chook then chop off the legs. Cut around the vent, be careful not to nick the intestine. Slice up to the sternum. Cut around the crop and remove it or push it inside to pull out the other end. Wiggle your fingers in under the skin to loosen the innards and they should pull out from the bottom end all in one piece. I keep the livers sometimes for pate - freeze them until I have enough. Stick you hand inside and find the lungs in the rib cage, scoop out with fingers - not easy in bantams. Leaving the lungs in makes them smell a little weird when you defrost the chook I think.

    Rinse chook and leave to set in fridge 24-48 hours after which you can freeze or roast. Setting not necesary for casserole.

    I often freeze the chook in pieces for dishes which do not require entire chook, but then my meat birds dress out at 2.4kg which would equal a number 24 if you could buy them that big!!! One chook lasts about three meals for my family of 5 - a roast, a fricassee and andwiches for lunch!

    Hope this helps.

    Elizabeth
     
  3. murray

    murray Junior Member

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    couldn't resist... :D

    [​IMG]
     
  4. mossbackfarm

    mossbackfarm Junior Member

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    heh, nice, Murray.

    We used to do a lot of our own processing of poultry before a local plant opened up last year...this site has some info and pics, but the best way to do it is leave yourself a lot of time and dive in....

    https://ianrpubs.unl.edu/foods/heg144.htm

    rich
     
  5. Richard on Maui

    Richard on Maui Junior Member

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    alternately, you can just skin them and not worry about the hot water bath and all the pin feathers.
     
  6. ~Tullymoor~

    ~Tullymoor~ Junior Member

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    Thankyou Elizabeth for taking the time to write all that, I appreciate that, also the link thanks Rich.
    Murray, when I saw you had posted I thought you were gonna say "Not a suitable subject for a kid-friendly website" so when I saw your little cartoon I cracked up!
    Richard on Maui. do you just grab the skin at the scruff of the neck and pull downwards?? (Assuming I can even chop the heads off a living thing!)
    I just don't know about all this self sufficiency stuff :( :( :( I had the plumber here yesterday to move a heater, and had him look at our two tanks and also to quote to reticulate water to our paddocks for when I get my goat babies.....well, he looked at me stupid and said "You aren't gonna water your goats with your tank water are ya? No way, you need a bore, haven't ya's got a bore??" NOooooooo, we haven't got a bore, those two tanks are huge,(11,000 and 7,000 Gals) that'll be enough won't it?
    "Nope, it's alright in winter, but summer they'll wipe you out", he says "Noone waters their stock from their tanks, look at getting a bore".
    Well, I don't know about everyone else, but we just moved here and took huge wage cuts for this new, country life (mine a complete cut....Im jobless) and just do not have the money to sink a bore to water goats. It'd be damn sight cheaper and easier to just buy milk and meat....besides, I don't know about all this bore business....if everyone has a bore and uses the water willy nilly won't the underground water eventually just run out????
    Sorry for the big whinge....somebody tell me some water/stock success stories??!!
     
  7. Tamandco

    Tamandco Junior Member

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    Elizabeth,

    What sort of chooks do you have and at what age do you process them? I would like to do all my cockerels together at a good age for roasting, and casseroling then freeze them. What age would you recommend.

    Thanks
    Tam
     
  8. SueinWA

    SueinWA Junior Member

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    Tullymoor, does this fellow have anything to do with a company that drills bores, or provides bore pumps or plumbing? Anyone that adamant about bores sounds like he has his own agenda!

    Sue
     
  9. ~Tullymoor~

    ~Tullymoor~ Junior Member

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    Hi Sue, no, he was actually doing himself *out* of a job by saying it.
    He is a local and a farmer's son and people (farmers) just don't use the house tank water to water stock. I will be though, I will just add more tanks, simple! :D
     
  10. SueinWA

    SueinWA Junior Member

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    "I will just add more tanks".

    That's what I thought! But all people have their own prejudices, and what one person can see in a side-glance, others can't see if they study it for a month.

    It can't be ignored that all the people tapping into a watersource is going to lower that watersource. Some will argue that water doesn't disappear, some of it goes back into the soil, and some moves on in water vapor and falls again in rain. That's true, but where the water comes out of the ground is rarely the same place where the rain falls! If water comes out of a bore in Sydney and falls in the ocean, it surely isn't doing Sydney any good!

    One of the things that permaculture depends on is people doing their own thinking. Sure, listen to what others think, then make your own decisions.

    Sue
     
  11. baringapark

    baringapark Junior Member

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    Hi Tam

    I do my excess cockerels at about 6 months. The last lot I did were a bit lean. They were a Brahma X and as such are a slow growing breed. The girls have only started laying now at about 8 months, so I should have left them longer. The 2 bantam Indian Game I did recently were much chunkier, but I haven't cooked them yet...still in the freezer.

    The other way to go is to buy day old meat birds. These are Indian Game, Plymouth Rock X which have been bred over generations to be fast growing and meaty. I do have issues with this, but I do buy them and grow them on for the freezer. If fed the commercial broiler pellets you can cull from 5 weeks old to 9 weeks. I let mine free range and give them grain and they are a lot slower to grow. If you overfeed or just feed the broiler pellets they get so heavy their legs give out by 3 months old or before. yep there are many issues here!!

    Hope this helps

    Elizabeth
     
  12. Tamandco

    Tamandco Junior Member

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    Thanks for that info on processing. I don't have any problem with supply and my birds are HUGE at 6 months anyway but the feeding thing has me a bit confused at the moment.

    I feed layer pellets plus a free range mix. I limit the FR mix otherwise they'll eat only eat that and leave the pellets. I'm doing it like this for ecconomic reasons as feeding them exclusively is out of our budget. I also give them all the household scraps but that wouldn't keep them going for very long. They have some access to fresh grass but only when I can supervise them as we have problems with foxes.

    Anyway, my query is this: I read a post a couple of weeks back (can't remember where) covering the issue of antibiotics if commercial layer pellets. I had no idea that this was how they administered the antibiotics. I assumed that they gave it to them in the water the same way that we administer other medications. The post advised that we read the contents of our pellets to see if the anibiotics are in there. Words ending in things like ...cillin.

    I feed Golden Yolk pellets because it's low protien and cheap (cheep, cheep) and I've looked all over the bag, and read the label, and I can't see anywhere where they've listed the ingredients.

    Does anyone know much more about this, or whether Golden Yolk contains these dreaded antibiotics?

    Tam
     
  13. SueinWA

    SueinWA Junior Member

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    Tam, can you contact them and ask? Here in the U.S., it is usually only the commercial egg farms that use antibiotics in the food routinely, due to the close proximity of birds, lack of sunlight, etc. Most of the home bird rations don't contain medication -- for chicks (where meds are suggested), you usually have to ASK for MEDICATED chick starter.

    But I don't know how it is in Oz. Would your local supplier know, or be able to find out?

    Sue
     
  14. Tamandco

    Tamandco Junior Member

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    There's been a bit of discussion on this topic lately so I thought I'd bump it up to the top.

    Tam
     
  15. Tezza

    Tezza Junior Member

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    Hey Tam. This may seam tooooo easy but....

    Maybe the money you spend on feeding the chooks and as a result of em being locked up too much... Could be better used on Putting up a barrier
    (fence thats larger then you got now.Fencing can cost buger all in reality..

    My self i use star pickets and chook wire small for babys....

    Larger size forlarger birds ..i hate the stuff but its so handy.i use 1 mtr high
    Trouble is it a bit of over kill for chooks ..its tough stuff more then stop a chook lol.stuff looks crap if used more then once.....Is anyone out there thinking of inventine a softer more flexible tpe of barrier to stop chooks getting out or over..I think that maybe a cross between fly wire/chok fencing would be absolutly brilliant....more moveable.less materials, eg. steel for fence and posts.etc etc...and thinner poles instead of heavy star pickets which are crap at removing later too.

    In your larger foraging area tam it would enable more freedom to you as well as those sexy silkies u have...also less expensive in feed. high protien is better, not low!!.

    Just to end this Pellet debate!!!!!

    What do others in here use ?

    Tezza

    trying to be helpfull to tam just for a change...
     
  16. Tamandco

    Tamandco Junior Member

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    Tezza, my trouble isn't my chooks getting out, it's the foxes getting in. Chicken wire won't stop a fox getting in. My fox proof run has got nearly 2' of cyclone fencing buried under the ground as a skirt around the perimeter, and the fences are made from 6' cyclone fencing. We're closing in the top as well although no one I know in this area has had a fox scale over the fences, only digging under. I know they are reputed to be able to, but the ones around here just don't seem to do that. I often see where they've attempted to dig, until they've met the barrier, and there's fox scats close by, including 6' from our back door. That's how bold they are. My chooks are welcome to free range our whole property as there's nothing they can damage. Anything that can be damaged is fenced in, rather than fencing in the chooks. It's just the foxes.

    The other reason I'm feeding a prepared layer pellet is for the protien content for my breeders and show birds. I've found in the past that if I keep the protien content up, I get a better hatch and stronger chickens. Would you believe Tezza that all 11 of those chickens survived, including the one I almost gave cpr to. :lol: 11 out of 12, that's not bad hey!

    I keep a commercial free range mix as a bribe as they love it, but I don't feed it as their standard feed as I've found that although the whole lot gets eaten, individuals will select only what they want, subsequently not getting a balanced diet, if that's their only food source. (by that I mean not having access to food scraps and green pick. The commercial layer pellet I use is 15% protien, ideally I'd prefer 18% like in a pullet grower, but that's really going overboard financially. I've contacted the manufacturer to obtain a list of the ingredients and there's nothing prohibitive included in it, which suits me fine. What I like about it is that the birds can't select out only what they like. They are forced to eat the entire pellet, providing them with a balanced diet.

    At the moment, I'm home nearly every day, so that means that my chooks are freeranging most days. However, if I'm away from home, I lock them up in their run. Not too much of a compromise as although I might be spending a bit more in food, I'm not risking losing all of my bloodlines in one go, as happened last xmas. The bloodlines of my breeding australorps can't be replaced. And even if I could buy something similar quality, I'm looking at $400 a bird!

    Tam
     
  17. Tamandco

    Tamandco Junior Member

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    Just had a read through the old posts and saw where I mentioned I was feeding a 'low protien' pellet. The reason for this was because the older hens were 'off the lay' for winter and as they tend to get a bit overweight and 'baggy' around the rear (australorps do if not doing very much) if I give them a high protien diet of season, and also to save money. One of the top breeders around here put me onto it for that reason, but I usually either a 15% or 18 percent protien pellet depending on what we're preparing/raising at the time. I'm running about 20 chooks at any one time & go through a single bag of pellets every 6 - 8 weeks, depending on how often they get out, which I consider pretty good going. A bag of free range lasts us 6 months!

    Thought this might clarify the discrepancies between my last two posts, the fact that they were written at different times of the year.
     

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