Worst plant fact sheet ever

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Adam, Apr 9, 2012.

  1. Adam

    Adam Junior Member

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  2. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    I do not see how it is the worst fact sheet ever, perhaps you are not familiar with a fruit from Eastern North America, and elsewhere in the Americas.

    Asimina, the pawpaw genus, various species of trees and shrubs native to eastern North America, including A. triloba
    Asimina triloba, a temperate tree with edible fruit, native to eastern North America
    Carica papaya, the papaya or papaw (pawpaw), a tropical fruit tree native to the New World
    Mountain papaya (Vasconcellea pubescens), the mountain papaya or mountain paw paw, a fruit tree native to South America

    Fruit looks superficially similar before being cut.

    Check out https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asimina_triloba for more information.
     
  3. Adam

    Adam Junior Member

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    I am American, so I am indeed familiar with A. triloba, which is why I find the fact sheet laughable. Clearly the person who made it is not familiar with the American tree. If you read the information carefully, you'll realize that half of the information is about A. triloba (red) and half is C. papaya (green), but it's all presented as the fact sheet for A. triloba. Additionally, the picture on the factsheet is a papaya. Also, although bisexaul, A. triloba is a poor self-pollinator and you really do need two varieties to get a crop.

    Native to North America, this large edible fruit was first cultivated by Native
    Americans.
    It once was a a staple fruit for families near main growing areas, but they fell
    out of popularity as global trade brought other fruits to the markets.
    Often mistaken for the similar looking Papaya, but it is unrelated as the papaya
    is only grown in tropical regions where as the pawpaw can tolerate a cooler
    climate.
    It is a medium sized tree that can grow up to 9m in height that has large, long
    droopy leaves that give the plant a tropical feel
    as it looks somewhat like a
    palm tree.
    The tree bears brownish-red to purple flowers that are about 5cm
    wide. Because this species is bisexual (pertaining both male and female
    organs of the flower) there is no need to plant multiple trees together to obtain
    fruit, as the plant pollinates its own flowers.

    The smooth green fruit that grow to be aprox 15 to 20cm in length, turn a
    burnt yellow colour harbours hundreds of shiny black seeds in the cavity within
    the fruit.

    Although the paw paw can tolerate cooler climates, it does require full sun and
    protection from the wind. Any exposure to extreme winds, of light frost with
    damage trees on all ages.
    Soil is best to be well drained as the paw paw does not like wet feet. Keep the
    surrounding soil rich in organic matter.
    The trees begin to fruit after about 18monhs, and the main harvest time is from
    spring all the way through to late autumn. Avoid the saw getting into direct
    contact with skin and your eyes as it can be an allergen in rare cases.
    Pawpaw is a delicate flavour that can be enhanced by squeezing the juice of a
    lemon or lime over the fruit.
    The flavour is a cross between a banana, pear
    and a mango
    and the texture is like that of a rockmelon. It have a varies
    culinary use from fresh flesh used in salads, juices, ice creams, sorbets and
    cocktails… through to chutneys and garnishes.


    This is what A. triloba really looks like:
    [​IMG]
    pawpaw fruit, Asimina triloba
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  4. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    But papaya can be red too....
     
  5. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    The text is an accurate description of Pawpaw, still not seeing it. Sorry :(
    I would also add that Pawpaw is also good in cakes, jams, wine, fruit drinks, and it can be used with limited success as a substitute for banana.
     
  6. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper Senior Member

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    Is the problem that Australians call Paw Paw the fruit Americans call Papaya???

    a bit like
    Coriander is a herb ands spice in Australia and only a Spice in the US, Cilantro is the herb.
     
  7. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    I'm confused
     
  8. Adam

    Adam Junior Member

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    Ah, you Aussies really don't know American paw paw (A. triloba) at all! I think that's why you are all so confused. I guess it's no wonder the Aussie who made this fact sheet was so mixed up. :D

    The text is definitely not accurate! As I showed above, only the red text is accurate for A. triloba. The green text is actually mistakenly referring to C. papaya. And the picture is clearly C. papaya, not A. triloba!

    For further clarification, here are parts of the description which are factually incorrect:
    - light frost will NOT damage A. triloba, it can take severe winter freezing temps even where I am from in the Northeast USA where we get snow regularly every winter
    - the fruit does NOT have hundreds of tiny black seeds, it has 4 to a dozen or so large black seeds
    - it is not really self-pollinating
    - it doesn't resemble a palm even remotely, it has a very pyramidal shape to it
    - it does not need full sun (though it enjoys it) and will do quite well in the shade
    - the trees will not fruit after 18 months and there is only one harvest time: autumn
    - the texture is not like a rockmelon but more like a custard or banana
    - when ripe they are usually light green, but some varieties are greenish yellow or brownish yellow when ripe, and more like 10-16 cm in length
    - technically the culinary part could be true of either species, except A. triloba would never be found in salads
     
  9. Adam

    Adam Junior Member

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    Eco, most of the red text is not true of papaya, although there is some text of both colors that could really describe both species such as the soil conditions and culinary uses.

    Papaya, for example, is not really native to N. America, but Central and South American. Papaya does not have brownish red flowers. I wouldn't describe the papaya's taste as a cross between banana, pear, and mango. Papaya can't really tolerate cooler climates. Bisexual papaya exists, but there are male and female papaya plants, too.

    So to sum up, this fact sheet is not true for either species but is really a mash up between both of them!
     
  10. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    So the A triloba picture has those big longish seeds and that is the one that can grow in temperate climates, not the one with the small shiny round seeds?

    Damn that isnt what I collected and it was labelled in the supermarket as American Pawpaw, no wonder it didnt grow for me.
     
  11. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Yes the one in the picture is for certain Pawpaw and not a Papaya.

    Pawpaw has male and female trees, although I do have a catalog or 2 here that have a grafted version, and another type that does not need additional trees for sexing since there are commercial cultivars of Pawpaw in America despite the low shelf life of the fruit.

    Pawpaw's have large seeds.
    Papaya's have lots of small seeds. (that help mischief ?)

    both can taste similar, the true difference IMO is in the flesh. Pawpaw can be very melon like in flesh, where as Papaya is more like a squash for lack of a better descriptive term which I am sure someone will attempt to flame me for. :-D



    Papaya, like Pawpaw do actually taste better with a squeeze of lime, and as many many aboriginal shamans have told me from all over the Americas... tropical plants need lime to unlock certain enzymes and so on to allow the person to absorb the nutrients better.


    Personally, I still do not see this nearly as bad as this whole thing is made out to be, but then again I have lived in places where both of these were wild & I notice the great similarities between the 2 ((NY State area, and Hawaii))



    PS - I would totally add a pawpaw to a salad.... a fruit salad! HA! Gotcha! ;)
     
  12. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Don't take any notice of me - I thought you were referring to the colour of the fruit, not to the text. Blonde moment....
     
  13. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    All that time and effort is buying a fruit every 6 weeks to make sure they definitely were not from the same tree, eating them so I could get the seed, freezing the seed so it got a 'proper' winter sowing the dratted things and they were a tropical plant not what they were advertised as- what a waste!!!
     
  14. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    [​IMG]
    what Australians call Paw Paw

    [​IMG]
    this,Asimina triloba i have never seen before
    It seems quite rare here. though listed here:-
    https://www.yaminarareplants.com.au/contents/edibleAndHerbal.htm

    Well spotted though, looks like a tree that could easily be grown in much of the country
    Want to come over the big ditch and start a plantation/nursery?
     
  15. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    I'm starting to think that might be a good idea...except for the snakes and crocodilles and dingos and too many Aussies.lol
    Oh and those bloody spiders
     
  16. Jem

    Jem Junior Member

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    you mean lime, as in calcium hydroxide ie what is found in snail & sea shells (which are then burnt to form calcium oxide) etc right? calcium oxide is chewed with certain tropical foods & stimulants like betel nut because it's highly alkaline & helps to keep many alkaloids in a freebase form which helps them be more easily absorbed into the blood. it also apparently forms reactive oxygen species... though lime (fruit) definitely does make papaya taste better!
     
  17. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    The dingos hardly eat people at all.
    The snakes only kill you if you poke them first with a stick or inadvertently tread on them
    The sharks, sadly, are a bit peckish of late.
    Crocodiles only eat Yank tourists who think they are Alligators
    The kangaroos only kill a few
    The spiders, less than dinner plate size, are harmless
    But the drop bears now there is one vicious, underrated animal!
     
  18. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    then why are they featuring a pic of the tropical pawpaw/papaya?

    it looked stupid from the first line, there is no confusion for me maybe for gardeners across the pacific but as long as the sun rises in the east i will never figure how they can get a common name like papaw for the fruit of asinoba triloba, one can reasonably derive the name pawpaw from papaya. same as calling pumpkins winter or summer squash (yes i know they are all the same family but we are talking common names here) the rhyme was peter peter pumpkin eater wasn't it. maybe another case of might is right. just had a look at the posted asinoba frut pic's yep more like a custard apple nothing like a pawpaw

    i thought the asinoba fruit was more related to maybe custard apple? looks like a big mango from pic's i've seen. we agree on mangos bananas oranges and apples etc.

    anyhow bow to power
     
  19. Adam

    Adam Junior Member

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    I crossed the big ditch a little over a week ago. I guess I should've brought some A. triloba seeds with me! Oh well. Something to think about next time.

    Len, you are dead on. It's in the custard apple family, but really does have a mango-like look to it from the outside, doesn't it?
     
  20. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    that's always been the case with me how who ever could compare it with a pawpaw is beyond me.

    dunno would triloba seeds grow in our sub-tropics?

    len
     

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