Woody Weed Resources

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself Here' started by Paul C, Sep 23, 2016.

  1. Paul C

    Paul C New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2016
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Gender:
    Male
    Climate:
    Warm Temperate
    Hey there everyone,
    I'm on the Mornington Peninsula in Victoria and involved in a few bushland groups down that way and am currently trying to find productive uses for some of the weeds being selectively removed from some of the Peninsula's reserves. At the moment it feels like a wasted resource.
    Grasses and ground flora are easier (chickens/hot composts) but am struggling to think of logistically appealing ways to use some of the woody weed resources (species like Boneseed - chrysanthemoides monilifera, sweet pittosporum - pittosporum undulatum and African Daisy - senecio pterophorus in particular) Any particular uses for woody weeds that anyone's found and can share?
    Much appreciated :)
    Paul
     
    Grace Pignatello likes this.
  2. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2006
    Messages:
    3,046
    Likes Received:
    199
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    E Washington, USA
    Climate:
    Semi-Arid Shrub Steppe (BsK)
    Hi Paul and welcome,
    Although I'm not familiar with the species you mention, I'm wondering whether they could be chipped along with any tree branches you might have and used as a mulch?
     
    Grace Pignatello likes this.
  3. Paul C

    Paul C New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2016
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Gender:
    Male
    Climate:
    Warm Temperate
    9ANDA1F Thanks for the reply, much appreciated. Absolutely - at this stage chipping is the best option but with only sporadic access to a chipper at the moment I was looking for additional uses, particularly value-adding uses - also a few species (like coprosma repens) are unable to be chipped without producing very weed-rich mulch. Cheers again :)
     
  4. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2013
    Messages:
    1,780
    Likes Received:
    142
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    gardening, reading, etc
    Location:
    near St. Charles, MI, USoA
    Home Page:
    Climate:
    -15C-35C, 10cm rain/mo, clay, full sun, K-G Dfa=x=Dfb
    if there is a chance of the material causing further problems
    if there are seeds or viable roots or such, i could see that the
    moving of it would be a potential problem (spreading along roads
    and any spots where it comes to rest).

    my best thoughts on it would be chop and drop in place as
    then you are not spreading the problem and giving the nutrients
    back to the place where it was grown. chipping or chopping
    shouldn't really be needed as in most places the longer a
    mulch can stick around the better.

    another thought would be to make piles, cover it up and then
    light it on fire to char it. then you have a lighter material to
    move if you need to and it won't spread the weeds themselves.
     
    Grace Pignatello likes this.
  5. Paul C

    Paul C New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2016
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Gender:
    Male
    Climate:
    Warm Temperate
    Hey Songbird, cheers for the reply :) yes, the chop and drop method is currently in practice, but leaving the weeds in situ is causing smothering issues, preventing recruitment of indigenous species - I'm in the incipient stages of trying to move contractors away from the culture of herbicide application and leaving weeds on site and towards a culture of harvesting. Long road I know :) Your point about the mulch is great - I'll think on it thanks again
     

Share This Page

-->