Why permaculture?

Discussion in 'The big picture' started by Ludi, Apr 7, 2012.

  1. Ludi

    Ludi Junior Member

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    So maybe another answer to "why permaculture" is "it offers many options to solve a particular problem." Including how to grow food and build houses. :)
     
  2. Grahame

    Grahame Senior Member

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    Why Permaculture?

    Because it is Permanent and Sustainable (or should be). Permaculture doesn't exclude anything that is truly sustainable (indefinitely). Well built, wooden structures can be very sustainable. I have my doubts about continual ploughing.
     
  3. matto

    matto Junior Member

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    Traditional Slash and Burn Agriculture Sustainable Solution to Climate Change

    Swidden or shifting cultivation is thought to be primitive and destructive when it is in fact a highly productive form of ecological farming. Intensive agriculture as practised in much of the world is a leading source of carbon emissions.

    “Research shows that our form of shifting cultivation is good for the climate and biodiversity and helps us be self-suffecient,” said Phokha through a translator at the climate workshop.

    The community plants 60 to 100 different crops in forest plots that have been burned to clear them. Fire and forest management are crucial and the burning only lasts for a couple of hours he said.

    However in an effort to reduce air pollution the local provincial governor banned all burning. But other regions where Karen’s practice swidden agriculture have no air pollution problems said Phokha.

    Karen communities were doing their own research and invited scientists to do a ‘carbon count’. Researchers at Indigenous Knowledge and Peoples Foundation found that their swidden practices soak up nearly 750,000 of tonnes of carbon over an area of about 3000 hectares. Burning only releases 400 to 500 tonnes.

    The fire ban was lifted and now government experts in Thailand are flocking to Phokha’s community to learn more.

    “Our communities have become a learning site for government officials,” he said with a smile of satisfaction.


    https://newswatch.nationalgeographi...lture-sustainable-solution-to-climate-change/
     
  4. Ludi

    Ludi Junior Member

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  5. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    Thanks for that link, I found it really interesting and bookmarked it so I could go back to it.
     
  6. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Interesting, yes. The article was a little light on info, as was the pdf.

    Seems a sustainable way to clear without reliance on tools but without comparisons, I wonder if that biomass returned to the soil and then left fallow after would be just as good, if not better. Fire just seems so destructive to me.
     
  7. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    You should research Emelia Hazelip & Synergistic gardening. It's what I started doing on top of my straw bales in order to help facilitate the feeding of the soil as well as my stomach.

    I am actually surprised more people don't chop & drop (in the kitchen garden), & instantly replant; It mimics what occurs in nature after all.
     
  8. Finchj

    Finchj Junior Member

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    Before I sliced my finger open while cutting back some short grass with a machete, I had just thought I should do this.

    My plan was to get the paths clear enough to see again, then use my much safer small knife to "chop and drop" and replace with new seeds. Too bad I had to cut my hand open.

    Maybe its a sign from the universe that I should teach my family more and take a step back?

    More likely its just a failure to follow the number one rule of blades- always cut away from yourself.

    Glad we are doing permaculture even if I do run the risk of being an idiot and hurting myself. Why?

    Because we already have things growing and we aren't so hung up on controlling everything. I can still plant seeds, watch, and learn. If I were trying to have a standard row garden with all the completely unnecessary work, I'd be out of commission and probably angry.

    Which is another reason why permaculture works so well. Understanding that our ecological niche, if we so choose, can be that of a facilitator. I don't have to always be "doing something" for the soil to be improving. All I have to do is watch, nudge, and claim more land for restoration. After all, we can't expect to be feeding ourselves in a second year garden! Especially given the state of our sites health. Its come leap and bounds in the past year, but not far enough.

    We and easing into permaculture rather than setting unrealistic demands upon ourselves. It'll come in time. The assurance that comes with permaculture is reason enough to follow it.
     
  9. Justin JQ

    Justin JQ Junior Member

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    As a chinese I should say that you are right. mainly there are no sustainable agriculture as I know, we probably have some oganic farm but very few.

    I don't know why there is a arguement on plough agticulture. I don't think it relate much to sustainable agriculture, it's just a way of planting...
     
  10. Ludi

    Ludi Junior Member

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    This video discusses an argument on plough agriculture: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8nLKHYHmPbo
     
  11. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    We have so much lost knowledge it is staggering. For example, in the 1950's Schauberger made a "Golden Plough" and he suddenly became visited by the Salzburg treasury department.

    Pages 103 through 104, Living Water - Schauberger and the secrets of natural energy. By Alexandresson.


    I don't plough, ever. It destroys too much of the soil, and the soil is needed more then people realize for healthy food, however if I had to, I would do it on contour, using the proper plough (plow).

    I am even considering switching to a wooden trowel for planting transplants.
     
  12. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    so justin you are claiming the chinese dont compost their biodegradable waste
    most people in the west are in awe of China feeding itself and the rest of the world
    i would love to know how its done:)
     
  13. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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  14. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    anyone ever try google earth China?
     
  15. Ludi

    Ludi Junior Member

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