why going to seed?

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by knighter, Aug 10, 2011.

  1. knighter

    knighter Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2009
    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    can anyone help me, i live north nsw sub tropics i've planted cos lettuce boc choi leafy greens, chilli, snow pea.
    useing good mushroom compost and organic soil and 6hrs morning sun, why has my leafy greens gone to seed and some lettuce not grown as good as others?
    Any help would be great
    knighter
     
  2. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2009
    Messages:
    2,456
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Farm manager/ educator
    Location:
    Hunter Valley New South Wales
    Home Page:
    Climate:
    warm temperate - some frost - changing every year
    I'm tempted to say "climate change" but the situation is too serious. It is a tough one to answer from so far away but we have experienced it a bit here at Purple Pear with bok choi and tatsoi and I have put it down to fluctuating temperatures. Lovely warm weather has suddenly given way to cold and windy days and some chilly nights so the plants get a little confused and worried about their future and set seed "just in case" Six hours of Sun seems a little shaded for a vegie garden to me too. Different lettuces grow better in the winter - you could try Corn Salad as a winter green. I am warm temperate here so it may be that you have different climate up in Potsville.
     
  3. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    2,721
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    inland Otago, NZ
    Climate:
    Inland maritime/hot/dry/frosty
    Is the soil too dry?

    I've grown lettuces in the shade. Not in the winter though.
     
  4. Grahame

    Grahame Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2008
    Messages:
    2,215
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Inconsistent water can do it, i.e. dry out, get wet, dry out.

    Also if they are planted out as seedlings, they may be a bit 'old' or too long in the punnet. The chinese cabbages (bok choi, etc) seem to be particularly susceptible to it.
     
  5. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Messages:
    1,442
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Try some varieties that are slow to bolt, that's usually the phrase in their description. A particularly cooperative bok choi is joi choi, I can do it on a cool coast in the summer! And I am guilty of not getting transplants in quickly enough. They may look just fine, but the whole process seems to set them off unless they are plunked in rather early.
     
  6. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5,925
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Don't forget that it's OK to leave some of the ones that have started to flower to attract pollinators to your garden. They are a useful part of integrated pest management too. Use them as a "sacrificial" crop for pests.
     
  7. mike

    mike Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2009
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    I reckon its moisture,not consistently moist and maybe too much warmth.Crazy as it sounds in winter you might grow them under a light shade cloth.
     

Share This Page

-->