what's breeding in my liquid compost?

Discussion in 'Breeding, Raising, Feeding and Caring for Animals' started by pebble, Nov 26, 2010.

  1. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    I started a bucket of liquid compost for plants I don't want in the other composts. I haven't had a lid on it and now it's got these larvae/maggoty things living it. They're whitish, a couple of centimetres long when at their biggest, and they have thin tails maybe a cm long. They seem to swim around a bit. Kinda creepy but intriguing too.

    Any idea what they are, and what if anything I can do about them? I guess I should cover the bin...


    hot dry inland maritime climate, approaching summer.
     
  2. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    There's also a couple of clusters of bright white elongated eggs today. I haven't been around so I don't know what's been flying there apart from blowflies.
     
  3. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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  4. pippimac

    pippimac Junior Member

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    I reckon sunburn's right and you'll get hoverflies.
    I'd leave the (really hideous looking) maggots to do their thing.
    I never see honey bees around, bumblebees and hoverflies are my main pollinators.
     
  5. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    The chooks and ducks will go NUTS when you give them a few handfuls of the lovely wriggly fellas..... What a bonus!
     
  6. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    I haven't got any chooks and ducks, maybe I can give some to the seagulls ;-)

    I'm worried now because the grubs need to be able to crawl out onto something in order to do their next part of the cycle. I think I'll have to build some wee hoverfly ladders and maybe a jetty.
     
  7. SueUSA

    SueUSA Junior Member

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    "I think I'll have to build some wee hoverfly ladders and maybe a jetty."

    A floating dock and ramp?

    Sue
     
  8. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Good idea! I suspect the poor things are drowing at the moment :-(
     
  9. pippimac

    pippimac Junior Member

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    If these are the same guys that freaked me out as a kid, they can heave themselves up the convex inside of a plastic drum, no sweat.
     
  10. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Sun lounges and umbrellas? It could be hoverfly heaven!
     
  11. Susan Girard

    Susan Girard Junior Member

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    The insects I know as hoverflies don't have aquatic larvae.
    I have experienced these guys myself and yes they are very ugly I believe they are called drone flies, well in Australia anyway.
    They do pollinate, but they are largish and very much a fly, unlike the dainty little wasp like insect that is my understanding of a hoverfly.
    : )
     
  12. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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  13. pippimac

    pippimac Junior Member

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    Apparently droneflies are part of the hoverfly family.
    I've always called them hoverflies, but looks like the name could cover a few beasties.
    As for the fly in the link, it's familiar, but I've always filed it under 'random unnamed thing doing its thing'.
     
  14. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    That's funny! I have the same things here at my place!
     
  15. Susan Girard

    Susan Girard Junior Member

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    You're right Pippimac,
    There are over 6000 different species of hoverflies World wide. I was mainly thinking from my experience with our common Aussie hoverflies.
    : )
     

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