Whatam I doing wrong with my rosemary cuttings?

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Flatland, Oct 18, 2015.

  1. Flatland

    Flatland Member

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    A long time ago I took cuttings from rosemary and sprouted them and I don't remember having any trouble getting them to grow. I am now trying to grow some more. I have access to a big rosemary bush that the owner is happy for me to take as many cuttings as I want. I've taken about 10 cuttings put them in sandy soil plus very old horse poo, kept them watered and in the shade and they have all died. Help.
     
  2. Allan Babb

    Allan Babb New Member

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    The cuttings have to be new growth.
     
  3. Flatland

    Flatland Member

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    They are tip cuttings. But when you say new growth I doubt that the plant is growing fast. It's just a big old bush that gets no water and this winter, spring has been very dry
     
  4. Allan Babb

    Allan Babb New Member

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    In spring(whenever that is for you), new growth will emerge at the tips. This new growth will be herbaceous and not woody, so it will be a lightish green color(the stem, not the actual leaves). The woody cuttings will not root(like with most other plants).
     
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  5. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Woody cuttings will root in water. Pick a bunch and stick them in a jar and leave them on the window sill for 3 or 4 weeks (maybe change the water if it gets manky.

    Rosemary can be quirky though. You could try another plant from a different location. Or try cuttings in a mix that isn't so rich. And somewhere warmer. Can't remember your climate, but rosemary is a plant that grows in the sun/Mediterranean climate.
     
  6. Flatland

    Flatland Member

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    Thanks. I've picked some greenish tips and I am now trying them. I'll try some woody pieces in water. Milang is a Mediterranean climate. That's not the problem but I will also try some poorer soil and see how that goes
     
  7. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    If these methods don't work for you, don't give up. Trees and shrubs of the Salix family have long been used to force sprouting of roots, especially in hard to root species. If you can find a tree of this family, take some of the inner bark and steep it in water, this will give you a natural rooting solution which can be used as a soak or even as the rooting water. The new growing tips of most plants contain similar compounds.
     
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  8. Flatland

    Flatland Member

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    Thanks Bryant that is very interesting to know.
     
  9. Flatland

    Flatland Member

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    Grennish tips are still green so fingers crossed I am having more luck with these Cheers
     
  10. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    Great! Keep us informed of how it goes.
     
  11. DC Brown

    DC Brown Junior Member

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    Where I have cuttings in water I'll put a few grains of dried Ascophylum seaweed in the water. This is an expensive product but at the rate I use it it's actually very cheap. There are plenty of other seaweeds that provide rooting hormones, as does the cambium layer of Salix - as Bryant suggested above. Willow is very commonly used.

    I like the seaweed as it also provides very mild but comprehensive nutrition. Typically I want roots on all cutting in a jar before I'm off planting, and they often come in at different times. The wee bit of food keeps everything healthy till the batch is ready.
     
  12. Flatland

    Flatland Member

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    Never heard of ascophylum seaweed. You say other seaweeds have rooting hormones, does this mean I canuse the seaweed that I have for making sushi? Also could I just use the seaweed fertilizer?
     
  13. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    Ascophyllum nodosum is a large, common brown alga in the family Fucaceae, being the only species in the genus Ascophyllum. It is seaweed of the northern Atlantic Ocean, also known as rockweed, Norwegian kelp, knotted kelp, knotted wrack or egg wrack.

    If you can find a sea weed that has built in floats (air sacks) you have found a member of this family of seaweeds.
     

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