What type of tank?

Discussion in 'Designing, building, making and powering your life' started by Tulipwood, Feb 16, 2009.

  1. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Re: What type of tank?

    An interesting article to ponder when installing a tank from the A(Australia)BC
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009 ... 582450.htm
     
  2. AustBodhi

    AustBodhi Junior Member

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    Re: What type of tank?

    What a very interesting argument, and one that cannot be disproved as it appears that the study isn't published. So essentially we have an individual, Professor White, who has made a statement to the ABC that no-one can prove or disprove because his research, paid for by the Australian tax payer via CSIRO, isn't in the public domain. Isn't that nice?

    In fact I would really like to see the research to see if they have accounted for all the energy costs in mains water delivery. For example, a private water tank pumping to the house doesn't require endless miles of concrete pipes to disperse it. It doesn't require teams of council workers with trucks, diggers, etc to maintain it. And it also doesn't pump megalitres of water hundreds of kilometres.

    I could be wrong but I would assume that the energy to pump a single kilolitre of water (weighing a ton) a few hundred metres would be a LOT less than pumping the same weight of water 10's or 100's of kilometres. Of course I don't know since I don't have the public subsidy to collect the data, and the data that was collected via public subsidy isn't available.

    The key problem here is that a LOT of people will take this as 'evidence' that they shouldn't be putting in tanks or using the water when, in fact, there is no concensus that the research is correct. Anyone can have an opinion, but science says that all opinions should be open to rigorous peer debate.

    Whose bucket is Mr White, and the complicitous ABC, filling?

    Cheers
    Shane

    EDITED: In fairness to Prof. White and CSIRO, I have just sent both parties an email requesting details on this study. When I hear more, or can find the study, I'll post a report here.
     
  3. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    Re: What type of tank?

    yes shane,

    there is no such thing as indipendant honest research these days it is all paid for by someone with a vested interest, and ultimately who pays gets the results they want published.

    for us we get safer water to drink using the tank so we bought a big enough tank so we could be independant of the system so from that angle we don't cost the system money for water. and from our not so scientific observations the pump on the tank hasn't altered our power bill in anyway that would be noticed. just imagine how much power the huge pumps they use in producing and delivering water take hey??

    can see that pumping water from a smaller tanks that realy does nothing more than give the owner the pleasure of watering their lawns, gardens or washing the car/house/driveway does nothing to conserve or minimise in house water use from the system, so then the pump is an added factor, these same homes are using the allowable water use rate as well.

    len
     
  4. BruceStewart

    BruceStewart New Member

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    Re: What type of tank?

    One thing I have noticed was metal tanks survived fires (rural fires) quite well as opposed to plastic, fiberglass and concrete...
    here is a link to the Bushfire CRC and a report on water tanks, so if a static water supply is needed for fire fighting then
    this may be worth a read...

    https://www.bushfirecrc.com/research/dow ... hfires.pdf

    Feb this year I was in Victoria fire fighting and the contents of the report appear to valid....we went to houses totally
    flat to the ground and the metals tanks still serviceable....most with water!.....

    Cheers from Bungendore Bruce
     
  5. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    Re: What type of tank?

    g'day bruce,

    dunno mate maybe we saw diffrent pic's?? all the bushfire image that was put in front of us for a couple of weeks i can't say that poly tanks faired any worse than corrugated, saw just as many of both buckled by fire maybe saw more metal ones? mainly due to the fact that they may have been enpty. also with metal tanks pic's don't show the close up of all the joints that are sealed with a silastic/plastic type filler, the tank may look whole but could it not leak and be of no use anyway? the research you point to could be heavily weighted by vested interest like most reseach is.

    seen many poly tanks beside home sadly destroyed by house fires still standing and looking whole, the heat may? of course cause the poly to break down later but never the less.

    len
     
  6. Ice Czar

    Ice Czar Junior Member

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    Re: What type of tank?

    not all fly ash is sourced from coal or foundry combustion products
    https://www.westernpozzolan.com/cement_t ... flyAsh.php
    https://www.westernpozzolan.com/cement_t ... c_ATSM.php
    it was traditionally called pozzalan
    and can still be found in some areas of the world as a volcanic ash
    https://nabataea.net/cement.html

    (no idea if there are Australian deposits)

    typically the chemical bonding of coal fly ash in the cement, precludes much in the way of metals leaching. Radioactivity is of course another matter (around here radon is a larger concern)

    https://www.buildinggreen.com/features/f ... elines.cfm

    (still Id personally opt for a class N pozzalan over a coal fly ash)


    https://www.google.com/search?q=fly+ash+ ... =firefox-a
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    a not so
    (above ground)
    https://www.ferrocement.net/
    https://www.rainwaterharvesting.org/urba ... uction.htm
    https://ecobites.com/diy-recycling-proje ... ?task=view
    https://www.oasisdesign.net/water/storage/
    https://www.appropedia.org/Ferrocement_A ... ountries_3

    out of all the options a ferrocement tank likely has the lowest energy\carbon footprint,
    granted steel manufacturing is energy intensive but there isnt alot of steel involved, there also isnt alot of concrete involved. Both plastics and galvanizing (zinc) are also energy intensive and more polluting. Logistically the steel and cement is probably closer with less total travel as well.


    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    even more traditional
    Ab Anbar

     

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