What to do with turmeric?

Discussion in 'Recipes & Remedies' started by eco4560, Jun 14, 2010.

  1. Tropical food forest

    Tropical food forest Junior Member

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    raw cane sugar is just as good

    whats even better is the big chunks of Cane sugar you can get at some asian grocery stores
    its a 1 kilo block. wellunder $10
    its a fraction of the price of palm sugar
    and has the full flavour because its staill has rem
    nants of the molasses in it

    just so tasty, not just in this drink but also in Capeirinha

    Lime juice 1/2 lime
    palms sugar or above mentioned raw cane sugar tsp to desert sp
    Cachaca - or a white rum will do. even a vodka 30 -45 ml

    really crush the and brusies the limes to burst the sacs
    but also to release the oils from the zest into the drink
    serve neat over ice
    great sundowner

    yes the turmeric drink has that earthy taste. you may acquire it

    try the same recipe with ginger if you want something hotter and more sharp
     
  2. mischief

    mischief Senior Member

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    Okay Im dribbling here.
    Does anyone in NZ have some Tumeric corms I can have or buy?
     
  3. aroideana

    aroideana Junior Member

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    Finally got some of the darker coloured Turmeric , and will start another patch .
     
  4. aroideana

    aroideana Junior Member

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    dramatic colour difference
     

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  5. Speedy

    Speedy Junior Member

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    That's the one Aroideana :)

    Just read through this thread again
    and thought I might mention another use for turmeric in cooking, this time with leafy green veges
    In Sri Lanka there is a range of dishes refered to as 'Mallum' or 'Malung'
    theyre all cooked pretty much the same way but it's the veg(s) that vary.
    Mallum dishes can also feature fruits- Jakfruit, plantain etc. or pulses,
    but it was the ones cooked with greens that stood out most for me.

    Gotu Kola Mallum - (Centella asiatica) ...Yes, Gotu Kola is the Sinhalese name for the plant
    Kangkun mallum - (ipomoea aquatica)
    Mukunuwenna mallum -(Alternanthera sessilis)
    Murunga mallum -(Moringa oleifera lvs)
    Kathurumurungu mallum- (Sesbania grandiflora lvs.)
    cabbage mallum
    Tampala (Amaranthus sp.)

    and I reckon NZ spinach mallum would be great

    the common ingredients to most of them are

    6 red onions (shallots)
    2 dry chilli flaked or cut
    1/2 dspn maldive fish
    1 sprig curry leaves (1 compound leaf)
    1/2 tspn turmeric powder - here you could add fresh grated turmeric instead of dried.
    salt
    lime juice
    1tspn cummin seeds ground
    3dspn fresh grated coconut - I ususlly use more :p


    wash and shred leaves finely
    slice onions and mix all ingredients in exept coconut and lime
    put into pot with a few tbspns water and boil.
    slightly grind coconut and add to lvs and simmer for a while.
    add lime juice, stir and serve.
     
  6. sindhooram

    sindhooram Junior Member

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    I dont really have any cooking recipies, but I ionce stayed at a center for ayurvedic and tribal medicines. The doctor there is quite famous for curing difficult diseases using bodywork,breathwork natural medicines and urine therapy. He gives to nearly all the patients who go there a blended mix of coconut milk (milk not water) turmeric and peppercorns. According to him black pepper the absorbability of turmeric in the body. I later read this fact in another place .....
     
  7. aroideana

    aroideana Junior Member

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    speedy , I have been waiting for the local tamarind trees to give me some fresh fruit to make your jamu ...
    just tried it hot off the stove ,its excellent , thanks very much .
    Also , I have made the mallum with daikon radish leaves I had growing , think I got the recipe from Charmaine Solomons excellent
    Complete Asian Cookbook .
     
  8. tropicalexotics

    tropicalexotics Junior Member

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    Where can I get some some of the orange tumeric Michael...does it taste different to the yellow?
     
  9. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Which has reminded me that I got to step 1 in the fish curry recipe but never got to step 2. I hope the curry paste has kept well in the fridge....
     
  10. permasculptor

    permasculptor Junior Member

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    I have heaps of the orange turmeric, if you want some I will post it to you .Just need an address.
     
  11. Veggie Boy

    Veggie Boy Junior Member

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    Harvested my tumeric plants today. I think there were four of them. I haven't weighed the harvest - but got quite a lot - certainly much more than I can imagine ever eating, particularly as I've never cooked my fresh stuff before. Any other recipes or uses would be appreciated :).

    [​IMG][/IMG]
     
  12. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Nice haul! One of the local permie ladies has dried hers and turned it into powder and she says it keeps really well. The other thing she had sone with it was to make a paste with turmeric and galangal, bottled and kept in the fridge. I don't know what ratio of one to the other but you could play with it and see. That way you can just add a spoon full to your curry or rice, or a drink or whatever.
     
  13. Veggie Boy

    Veggie Boy Junior Member

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    Like the paste idea eco. I failed with my ginger this year, but have some galangal plants as a border on one edge of my garden, which I assume will have some reasonable tubers. Do you know what the right time is to harvest galangal? I also have a fair bit of garlic left over from last year's harvest so could spare some of that for a paste also. Maybe tumeric, garlic and galangal in a paste which I can separate into portions and freeze for later use.
     
  14. Speedy

    Speedy Junior Member

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    unlike turmeric and ginger , galagal is evergreen and doesn't die off in the dry season (winter).
    so harvest anytime you need it by digging from the edge of the clump...nice tender pieces there.
    trim stems down to about 20-50cm high for transplanting or down to 5-10cm for easy handling/storage as food.
    the tougher , woodier pieces can be grated/ground into spice pastes or sliced and bruised (with the back of a heavy knife) and added as is to soups etc.
    any intact harvested rhizomes extra to your immediate needs can be stored in a container of damp sand in a cool shady place until needed.
     
  15. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Like Speedy said - you can harvest the galangal anytime. Turmeric, galangal and garlic sounds great! Now I wish I hadn't replanted all my turmeric corms... Still - next year I can make LOTS of paste.
     
  16. CJConline

    CJConline Group for banned users

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    Yes Please

    I have just completely my PDC in Perth a little over a week ago and am totally inspired :party: and would really appreciate getting some of the real orange stuff to grow. I use a lot of turmeric in our cooking and wonder whether the supermarket stuff has been the yellow variety cause I have found the I have a bit of problems digesting oily foods which is often related to low bile production. So would dearly like to try growing and using the orange one to see if it make a difference.

    Will PM you, it that OK with my details.

    Thanks so much for your offer,

    CHris
     
  17. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    There seems to be many types of Turmeric, as well as Galangal.

    One galangal I grew had short,ground-hugging leaves but produced a huge, almost translucent, stunning, orchid like flower. Unfortunately my winters, or black thumb, killed it and I have never seen one since.
    Sometimes I wish i was just firmly in one climatic zone or the other (Tasmania or Cairns) or
    had a garden in both places so I could grow whatever I wanted- tropic or temperate plant. Sydney promises both and you are tempted to grow tropicals but then along comes a week of frost; other plants I want to grow can't stand the heat and/or humidity of Summer.
     
  18. Speedy

    Speedy Junior Member

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    The ground-hugging one is a Kaempferia sp. , possible K.galanga 'Kencur' or 'Cikur' are a couple of the Indonesian names for it.
    I prefer not to refer to it by the misleading name 'Lesser Galangal' .... best reserved for Alpinia officinarium, a species rarely, if ever seen in Aust.

    Kencur can be a bit tricky to grow - it's dry season (winter) deciduous and can go backwards if not kept growing strong before going dormant.
    it can rot in the ground if it gets too wet when dormant.

    its easy to lose it in winter.
     
  19. Ive Fargottin

    Ive Fargottin Junior Member

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    :)
    Have you got any recipes for this little beauty!
     
  20. Speedy

    Speedy Junior Member

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    Balinese sate (satay) sauce using Kencur

    BASE SATAY - (Balinese Satay Sauce)


    250 g (½lb) raw peanuts, deep fried for 2 minutes or toasted in a dry pan until they're done (keep moving them or they tend to burn or cook unevenly) ...maybe 5min or so.
    3 cloves garlic
    5 cm (2") kencur rhizome, peeled and chopped
    3-5 birds eye chillies
    ¼ cup palm sugar (sub.with brown sugar if thats all you've got)
    1 litre fresh coconut milk (fresh is best , but from a can is better than none)
    2 tbsps kecap manis (sweet soya sauce)
    1 tbsp fresh squeezed lime (sub. lemon)
    1 tbsp fried shallots

    Combine peanuts, garlic, chillies and kencur in a food processor and puree or grind to a paste in mortar and pestle.

    Put in heavy pan along with coconut milk and sweet soy sauce.
    Bring to boil and then reduce heat to simmer uncovered. Cook for 1 hour, stirring frequently to prevent sauce from sticking. Add lime juice and shallots just before serving. Use as a dipping sauce for satay.

    Traditional way is on a cobek (a volcanic stone plate) and ulek ulek (a sort of horn shaped pestle) it's easier to use grinding/tearing action with a cobek rather than the pounding action like in a regular mortar and pestle.
    not essential but nice info if you like traditional food processing equipment.:)

    https://www.gourmetsleuth.com/Articles/How-To-Select-Cooking-Tools-647/indonesian-mortar-pestle.aspx


    https://toko-indonesia.org/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=835

    to season a cobek first grind dry rice and soaked rice in batches til the rice flour grinds white rather than grey.
    then grind turmeric rhizome with garlic and salt to sort of impregnate the stone with the flavours.
    That's how I was shown how to do it in Indonesia
     

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