what sort of dunny is best? - choosing an alternative to septic toilet

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by elliemay, Jan 5, 2004.

  1. elliemay

    elliemay New Member

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    I recently viewed a Clivus Multrum toilet at a fair with the intention of buying one but was amazed that the holding tank seemed so close to the pedestal and the house! I already have a septic which smells when it is too full which is too often it seems (and there are only two users and it was pumped out four months ago) and when the wind blows the wrong way. I once saw a toilet in a house in Crystal Waters which was in a bathroom clad in western red cedar and there were no nasty smells and the place seemed so habitable. Is Clivus the way to go or would you recommend another sort of dunny? ???
     
  2. matt

    matt New Member

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    We have doing some similar research and were also thinking about the Clivus. I think they are available with a longer drop if your site will allow. It also depends on the model. We have spoken to a rep who suggests the smallest model will easily accomodate 3-4 people on a regular basis, with I think a standard drop of 75cm?

    The difference we noticed in the range of loo products is mainly the batching, and I like the clivus because once the composting process is right, you dont change the tank. My parents are currently struggling with a Nature loo whose excess liquid drain is not functioning properly, meaning the catchment box needs to be emptied manually every forthnight! :p
     
  3. Chook Nut

    Chook Nut Junior Member

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    Hi all,

    I was speaking to someone i know at the pub on Tues and he said he bought a Clivus 5 years ago and has no regrets at all. He said that it was nearly 4 years b4 he used the castings around his garden. He said they throw in all their food scraps and paper as well. The only thing he said he has to do periodically is top up the worms.

    He mentioned the exhaust was excellent and had a small solar back up in case, and mentioned that there is no odour even when you go in straight after someone.

    I don't have personal experience but hope this helps a little. I only have sceptic and have no plans to do any conversion as yet.

    Cheers

    Dave
     
  4. Jeff Nugent

    Jeff Nugent Junior Member

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    Clivus is great. I say this as a user. CM8 is the model i'm using. As a conventional compost toilet they are recomended for a small family only. Add manure worms and the number of users is "almost" limitless. You just need to remove the castings more often.
    I've never needed to top up the worm population in mine in 5 years that it's been in action. If anything they need to be thinned out sometimes.
    Be sure to add plenty of dry sawdust or shredded cardboard.
    My rule of thumb is 2-4 handfulls a day depending on the amount of usage they have had.
    The Clivus comes with quite a long drop chute. It's up to the installer to cut it to length. That can be limited by the site.
    I have a personal like for outdoor dunnies and ours is a ramp up to a throne with a view fit for a king. :D
    In my humble opinion they are the best one on the market. I drove all around Australia checking them out in camping grounds and the Clivus was always the most presentable. Some were ugly :ghostface:

    I probably should qualify that I act as a local agent for Clivus but only sell what I'm comfortable with.

    The guy who used to own the company in Oz would give out free plans if people saaid they were building their own. Reason: he didn't want compost toilets getting a bad name.
     
  5. Snake

    Snake Junior Member

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    Elliemay,

    I am halfway through "Humanure" by Joseph Jenkins (available on-line from https://www.jenkinspublishing.com/humanure.html, and you can preview significant portions of the book on-line too, if you wish) and trying to ascertain the best way to go with a composting loo. It seems that many of the commercially available variants do not make full use of the "resource" and perhaps a simpler, more basic structure could be contrived that does not cost quite so much as a commercial one too. Either way, if you are considering the composting toilet option, I would heartily recommend this book - it is well written and quite entertaining (despite the content!) and covers composting generally in some depth as well.

    I am living in a house with an 'advanced' septic system at present, one of those that aerates and encourages breakdown of the contents and then pumps out the resultant water onto the garden when it is done. Of course it comes with all the standard warnings about not handling the water or growing veggies in it etc, and the septic still needs to be emptied every 5 years or so, apparently. As the soil here is very alkaline (a problem resulting from high salt levels in the water, I think?) the prospect of recycling the 'waste' as a source of organic material to improve the soil is an attractive one for our future residence.

    Regards,

    Mark Goodman

    :p
     
  6. alextacy

    alextacy Junior Member

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    For those interested in a cheaper (and portable!) option these local WA guys may have the goods.

    Their company is called Barefoot Engineering and their composting toilet is worm driven. Derek told me he grew his wheatgrass out of the resultant castings!! I couldn't tell if it was tounge in cheek, but I don't think I'd have any problem at least putting it on my fruit trees!

    https://www.barefootengineering.com/

    Just be careful what you eat with any composting system as what goes in... and scrutinise your visitors as well - no point in feeding your garden on humanure made from McDonalds! (you don't want any old sh*t!) :D

    A
     
  7. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    havinjg not long joined i know i am a bit late into this chat but nobody mentioned a composting toilet, simple design simple to use no smell and at the end of it a very usable product that the vege' plants just love, not to mention the worms. the one we are very pleased to use is 'nature-loo', nothing mechanical except the toilet lid hinge, can't break down and doesn't use water.

    len
     
  8. Guest

    Loo

    I cannot remember the reference but a few months ago I read something of a small australian business. They had developed a system for converting your existing septic tank setup into a composting/earthworm toilet. It was cheaper to retrofit the existing system than to put in a new composting loo. Pretty sure they were based in NSW. Sorry, I cannot remember more than that.

    Over here, I fertilize the trees in the orchard, one tree at a time. There's about 400 trees. Damn, it keeps me busy......
     

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