What I've done recently.

Discussion in 'Members' Systems' started by S.O.P, Nov 11, 2013.

  1. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Having a little nursery is growing things when you know you shouldn't be. Twice as much effort to get them into the ground, where does one find the time?:

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    Moringa air-pruned plants waiting for Winter to pass:

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    Assorted seedling trees and cuttings. Young Jackfruit in 3 airpruning pots:

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    Cajanus are flowering and the stingless are spending a lot of time on them. In here amongst Basil, Vetiver, Tree Daisy, Pinto, Dombeya, Marigold is a Pomegranate, Acerola Cherry, Dwarf Mandarin and White Shatoot mulberry under a larger Riberry tree:

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    The southern side garden in rest, Moringa will start to drop leaves soon and reshoot when the weather warms up:

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    The original mini food forest, Jaboticaba and one where I'm standing, Acerola, Dragonfruit up the back, sick Grumichama, Washington Navel and Eureka Lemon off to the left with Acacia overstory:

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    Moringa coppice, Leucaena, Icecream Bean, Tithonia, Acacia, Grevillia, Banksia, Chicken, Lomandra:

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    Wicking beds and other stuff, last banana bunch blocking some sun:

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    Pawpaw/Papaya on the southern side with its head up in the sun:

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  2. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    The green manure wicking bed with a Loofah still with 3 fruits and sweet potato. For some reason, assuming the weather, the last loofahs won't ripen. I was hoping to have killed the vine by now but 3 sponges are 3 sponges so it will wait:

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    The mostly yellow dragonfruit are still growing well. There are 2 other colours working their way up the trunk and I forget what they are:

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    Had a nice harvest of a bit of everything last night, brocollini and silverbeet contributing the most with a heap of Tatsoi:

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    Dombeya are beginning to flower, haven't spotted any bees figuring it out yet:

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    The naturestrip basil are littering the footpath. I don't have the heart to cut these back as the bees are always on them:

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  3. bazman

    bazman Junior Member

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    Looking great dude, you must inspire some of the local foot traffic in your area. =) Got any lomandra forsale? 100-200 would be good. =)

    When are you going to grab the Bincharra?

    Baz
     
  4. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    If inspiring them with a monoculture of basil is inspiring, then consider them inspired! I now have one Tatsoi in the strip too, that's basically it this time around. Far cry from Kale, Pumpkins and everything else I had going on last time. Not enough time, or water, to keep the front going. Bees like it though.

    I have 234 full-sized Lomandra without checking the trays for midgets (3 trays of 80 each subtract 6) so could be 210-220 worthy stock. Would I get the trays and pots back? I'm loathe to let that number go as that's a big dent in my tube collection. 160 smaller stock.

    May be heading up there this weekend but wasn't planning on taking trailer. If you want to meet up and swap?

    Send me an email.
     
  5. Australian Beekeeper

    Australian Beekeeper Junior Member

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    Looks great mate. I have a lot of footpath. Over the next few years will make it into a vetiver hedge on the outside of the fence like yours I think. Did you just do it or had to ask council?

    Edit:
    Last time I asked about moringa. Did some reading and contemplating giving it a go. Is it easy to keep it small/ coppiced as I know they are a large tree. Also what are the roots like if you know?
     
  6. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Depends on your Council. If you ask, they say "No" because of the liability issues I would say and then you've drawn attention to it. Design it with a duty of care to keep the trees/vegetation out of the way to avoid complaints and you should be right. What's the saying? "It is often easier to ask for forgiveness than to ask for permission."

    I'm wonder if going head to head one day may be a positive to try and get social media involved, to point out the futility of dead suburbs and no kerbside food. Someone like Costa would be nice to run at the forefront.

    Moringa has a soft, corky tissue and the roots are edible so I would gather they are precisely the same below the ground as the above ground softness. You can't eat hard wood, for example, no matter how much you boil it. Super easy to coppice or pollard, one of the easiest. They will put on 3-4m a Summer so you may even do it twice. We eat some and most of the leaf I find goes awesome in the worm farm, I've even laid it on a foot thick and it's gone in no time. The high plant proteins and all the other goodies should be beneficial for the worms, which then goes back into my pots or wicking beds. Yes, it's a big tree but that's a poorly managed one with barely any leaf on it.

    When/if you visit you will see Moringa in all stages; full-shaded, pollarded, coppiced and let go (my Winter cut back is coming up because I find spidermites attack the leaves in the shaded areas and I can only assume they are sucking carbohydrates from the tree so it's better to remove the leaves). I may even have some seed left over, I just checked through the poorly arranged cupboard and it looks likely without cracking the jars all open.
     
  7. Australian Beekeeper

    Australian Beekeeper Junior Member

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    Fine to ask for forgiveness as long as I can't be sued/fined. May go with lomandra for the outside fence hedge. They grow naturally in the bush beside me.

    I would certainly get involved in such a push. I will work it out later but I would estimate I have about 1000m2 of grass on the curb. Such a waste.

    Really looking forward to seeing it all. Morninga in particular interests me a great deal:)
     
  8. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Sued for Vetiver? What a world we live in.

    I'd pick Vetiver over Lomandra for full sun any day of the week. Vetiver has a product, Lomandra not so much.
     
  9. Australian Beekeeper

    Australian Beekeeper Junior Member

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    Haha I was exaggerating but you never know nowadays! Your wicking beds seem to be working great. How do the ibc's hold up in the sun?
     
  10. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    3 coats of paint. Hopefully longer than bare.

    Stainless steel or even Uv plastic, designed by wicking bed nerds for under 50 each would be nice.
     
  11. BelindaKate

    BelindaKate Junior Member

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    I'm loving all these pictures of your garden. I especially love that you're getting away with all that basil in the front strip! There's a new lady in the local council who's getting a community garden done in town. She seems to be a permaculture fan, so I'm hoping that perhaps she might help me get a full-on edible verge garden approved. Then my biggest problem will just be stopping the neighbourhood dogs from taking a dump in my beds. :p

    Do you know if Moringa handles frost? I'm going to take a crack at growing tagasate, which I think should be okay, but I've been told that moringa is a lot more intollerant of frosty winters.
     
  12. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    There is nothing stopping the urine levels or dog/cat poo. Personally, I would consider a verge garden a demonstration garden, one that you can prove that gardening is easy to people that walk buy. Pumpkins and Kale were the big winners, I lost them all to hungry hands but that was the point. Things get taken, I put up signs to indicate it was ok but even if I didn't, people can't help themselves.

    No, Moringa does not handle frost, or even the cold. The secret is to cut the stump down to ground level before the frost, cover it up with mulch right over the top nice and thick, and then remove when frost passes. I spoke wiht an American in Zone 6 (from memory) that was growing them perennially in big pots and bringing them in. His photos looked good so it can be done.
     
  13. BelindaKate

    BelindaKate Junior Member

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    That's why my more desirable crops are going in the backyard. :D But I like the idea about growing extras as "sacrificials for the greater good". ;D I would LOVE to have neighbours get more interested in growing their own food. We're bordering farmlands, so a lot of my neighbours have blocks much larger than mine. But they're all filled with swimming pools (which only get used for, like, one month of the year) and lawns. Best case scenario, a couple of the oldies have a row of roses.

    Wow! I've heard of people trimming back to the trunk, then covering the truck with carpets and mulch and such, but I discarded that idea as an eyesore. I will DEFINITELY be taking a crack at cutting them down to the ground. My back (scoliosis) can't take moving pots around, so it'll be the cut/mulch method for me.
    Let's see if it works! ;D
     
  14. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    I'm trialling some Moringa in amongst deep Pigeon Pea to see how that goes but there has been no frost yet (you may have been able to tell that some of my photos change between 2 different properties). Still waiting for Winter to come (QLD is very warm this year), so we'll see. Other growers in the area say they don't grow well but that may be the damaging action of previous exposing cold Winters that affected Spring/Summer growth. They put on a lot of growth during Summer so if Winter can be protected, I don't see why they can't grow as I've hacked a couple down to ground level and they coppice quickly and readily. I've 5 ready to go in pots for Spring and if the original trial plant dies through Winter then the cut off and cover method will be employed from now on.
     
  15. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    For the tropical/subtropical readers.

    A coppiced Leucaena of hefty size living symbiotically with a Syzygium luehmanni (a native edible) street tree. I would say this was possibly the second major cut after the big first cut and they were positioned quite nicely together.

    No photos of before but if you can imagine a street tree with a expanse of Leucaena filling in beneath it, that's what it was. You can see if has effectively prevented the grass from coming close to the trunk, besides the Dianella that had some sun exposure.


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  16. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    New woodcutting toy.

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  17. Australian Beekeeper

    Australian Beekeeper Junior Member

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    Very nice! :)

    Was the street tree combo in the prior post your doing in the beginning?
     
  18. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Yes, that's the finished product. The Lilly pilly also got lifted for visibility out of the driveway.

    The Leucaena will live to fight again. Wish I would be alive when the humble mower dies and the suburbs convert into something else.

    The oldies are going to lose their little dogs.
     
  19. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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    Nice axe! What makes the wood handle appear to be encased when viewed from the bottom end? Did you make the handle??
     
  20. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    The edges are filed off, maybe after treatment or the wood grain is just that contrasting.

    Bought it like that. There was some Plumbs, Hytests, Collins and some English stuff but this head happened to be in the best condition and had a new handle. The handle, though, is way thicker than the others which pushes up the weight but it is for splitting Eucalypt so hopefully that will help. Probably Spotted Gum handle as is most of our local handles.

    Head is 4.5 pounds.

    I want to buy more now, I can see the value in collecting them.
     

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