What I've done recently.

Discussion in 'Members' Systems' started by S.O.P, Nov 11, 2013.

  1. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Re-visited another public orchard to some dismay. The ground was littered with wasted Jaboticaba (no bird attack!), the Longans were untouched. No one cares? Not fully pictured are Carambola, White Sapote, Black Sapote, Grumichama, Inga and assorted Citrus. Lots of Persimmon coming on too, lots of young Black Sapote and Ice Cream Beans and the Carambola had many green fruit.

    The Longan was absolutely killing it, 2 trees covered with fruit. So much better than the one I got. The difference? Probably Roundup keeping the grass down and large woodchip-mulched areas.

    We filled a bag with Jaboticaba and Longan for snacking throughout the day and sharing with whomever we met.


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    Can I please ask for some help in IDing this particular fruit? It has milky sap.

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  2. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper Senior Member

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    Looks like a sapadilla??
     
  3. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    perhaps people don't know it is there? besides if they are spraying i'm not sure i'd want to pick fruit from there.
     
  4. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    That's it. Thanks Grasshopper.
     
  5. Australian Beekeeper

    Australian Beekeeper Junior Member

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    Few months since an update S.O.P
    Lots of Autumn growth coming on?

    Also had a question, when do you lift and split your vetiver? My slips have grown into hefty clumps :)
     
  6. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Yeah, not feeling the forum thing. Feels like I'm talking to a brick wall around here.

    I've been reading a lot of https://www.facebook.com/groups/Regrarians/ and while it's not aimed at anything I do, it's interesting to see what's happening across the world and how it's getting done.


    I've been thinking about your Vetiver question and it's so close to the cusp I'm not sure if I could recommend it or not. I did a few strips this later last year, the weather dried up and they didn't perform very well. They all survived but they were so far behind other hedges that were planted earlier. I suppose theoretically if the plants don't get the roots down due to the cold weather, they are at a greater risk of dying as opposed to the ones that were planted in the heat and the summer rains.


    Due to timing this year, I didn't get to break up my second batch of propagation clumps (I decided not to sell/give away). Ideally, the clumps should be between 4-12 months as they propagate more readily when juvenile. My clumps will be borderline after 12 months by next year (edit: not next year, next planting season I mean) if I irrigate rather than wait for the rain. Makes the digging harder though.


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    I'd give it a go as a personal experiment. Perhaps don't use mulch so the soil temp is a little higher. Do some in pots too with some potting mix and keep in the full sun to compare. A good yardstick is to compare the growth of any pasture grass around, if that's slowed down or stopped, so will the Vetiver growth and it's not wise to transplant something that isn't actively growing.
     
  7. Australian Beekeeper

    Australian Beekeeper Junior Member

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    That looks like a great little group. I joined.

    Thanks heaps for the advice. May give the experiment a go, though it got cold today :-/ I was amazed with how quickly it grew over the summer. Fantastic little plant.

    Thanks again S.O.P

    P.s. I listen better than your average brick wall, always look forward to your posts as your ideas are often in line with mine andwhat I would like to achieve here :)
     
  8. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    The way I'm leaning with the Vetiver is just to do it in the prime-time of year and go hard at it. It was so cold today there is no way it's going to transplant that great (just watch, 40 degrees next week). In a way it becomes the job you do at 1700 in the shade of a tree, digging up and separating Vetiver for planting 5-10 days later. It's not going to hurt you to wait so that is a viable option.


    Vetiver sure beats a whippersnipper on a useless bank and I'm surprised more people don't use it. The picture above had already been cut once and that is now over 6ft high. It's one of the only things that actively grows during a dry Summer too (besides your large trees).
     
  9. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    For you, AB, and I can't guarantee I will keep this up. No descriptions unless you ask me about the specific photo. First up, Sunshine Coast:

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  10. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    About the only thing interesting happening here is the new air-pruning pots I lashed out on (the 1.5L sized pot in the group of pots) and the Bunya Nut experiment by germinating the seeds and repositioning the tubers into pots. The last photo is the tuber starting to put on growth, some others had at least 2cm coming out:


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  11. Australian Beekeeper

    Australian Beekeeper Junior Member

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    Thanks so much for sharing SOP. I am using the vetiver similar to how you are in image 3 along my low edge berm (about 60m of berm) pretty sparse at this stage though but yes with the cold I will wait until spring to lift and split.

    What is that plant at the start of you second photos post? Have never seen it before.
    Bananas are looking good. Quite tall, are they lady fingers? I have some ducasse here (at least that's what I think they are, Philippino mate calls them sugar bananas).
    What's the worm set up? Bathtub? Looks to be lined with something? I have a small plastic crate system that worked in previous dense housing but looking to upsize now.
    Cant wait until my jack is like that, I am happy it is growing pretty fast.

    Thanks again for sharing.
     
  12. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    The sunshine coast bananas never produce as they need to be bagged, too many animals. I sometimes get bananas here in Brisbane without bagging. They are Lady Fingers.

    Moringa is the plant. We eat it and I feed the worms with it. Makes a good chop and drop too.

    Shademesh with a false wooden floor made out of two hardwood pieces that run end to end, then pine pieces that are perpendicular to the hardwood that run from side to side. The shademesh lets a very fine silt through which makes for a different casting product.
     
  13. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Trying something that I couldn't find a hint of online.

    Eating the tuber from a Bunya Nut:

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    Peel by rubbing with thumb and forefinger, boiled in salted water for 20 mins. You get a less starchy tuber with a bunya nut and parsnip/turnip-like flavour.
     
  14. Australian Beekeeper

    Australian Beekeeper Junior Member

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    Interesting regarding the bunya nuts. Will try them one day.

    I will have to research that moringa too!
     
  15. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    i love how they look! my search online found a few people saying they were edible. such a tree with character too, i wish they would grow here.
     
  16. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Most of the info was regarding the indigenous australians storing them and coming back later, very thin on people actually eating the tuber and barely a photo to be found (found an excellent one from CSIRO along the way). What did you read, can you remember the details?
     
  17. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    hi, sorry, i'm not an expert on these for sure, but i used google and found this page which provide no further cite:

    https://wildstories.wordpress.com/2012/09/12/on-bunya-nuts-bumper-crops-and-the-wait-for-tubers/

    this was taken from using the google search:

    https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=bunya+nut+tubers

    Here is another link with some info:

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct...m4CoBw&usg=AFQjCNFkHcVRUY4Y2VpVWLmTLRHmMcYQcQ
     
  18. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    That last link makes it sound like the tubers could possibly be a bad thing as a germinating seed could be dangerous. Interesting, nonetheless. It's a good link and worth saving, so thanks.

    The first link is the same information that has been propagated across the web, mostly over blogs, that the tubers are edible but nobody ever posts that they actually have done it.


    My partner made a soup last night and we cut up 3/4 of the tubers and put them in uncooked with potato, sweet potato, carrot, turnip etc. Interestingly, when cooked over that period of time and cut thin, the vascular bundles? become quite pronounced and visible. Tastes like any other vegetable in the soup with a hint of bunya starch. The rest I ate warm out of the salted water.


    Not sick today, not gassy either so it was successful.
     
  19. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    i didn't see too much problem in that cite, so i may have missed something, but i recall it just said that boiling/cooking them will work.

    "During germination
    ,
    an "after-nut", a form of crisp, coconut-flavoured tuber of
    approximately the same size as the original nut, form
    s on the main root-stem and was also eaten (Noel
    1991"

    and

    "14
    Two major lectins have been isolated
    and characterised from pinhaos (Datta
    et al.
    1991; 1993).
    Lectins are a diverse group, of which a relatively few have some potential for adverse effects in
    humans. Some of the latter are found in common food plants (e.g. soybean and kidney bean) and
    require inactivation (by cooking) to avoid harmi
    ng digestion and growth. As lectins have been
    reported from other edible
    Araucaria
    nuts, the present study has included diagnostic tests for lectins in
    A. bidwillii,
    but not other bushfoods which, on the informa
    tion available, were unlikely to contain
    them."

    i thnk, like with many foods, moderation and variety are a good idea. the lack of actual reports of reactions or troubles is a good sign too IMO, especially in these days...
     
  20. Australian Beekeeper

    Australian Beekeeper Junior Member

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    It is good to see someone trying it :)

    Universal edibility test is always an option if you are completely unsure. I remember mucking around with that playing survival as kids. At the time we never called it that though, it was just what Pop taught us.
     

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