What I've done recently.

Discussion in 'Members' Systems' started by S.O.P, Nov 11, 2013.

  1. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Other Jaboticaba hedge is fruiting and just finished flowering at the same time. I could eat a million jaboticaba:

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    Finally got round to using the Plant Pink guards I was gifted from a local. Much better than those tiny green ones:

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    Kept nearly treading on this guy whilst planting:

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    Using these thistles to stop some cows from testing my poorly built fence that protects the Pinto, Inga below:

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    Finished planting the last of the Rocket pot Mulberries. Four in total. These 2 have a higher guard:

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    Vetiver clumps waiting to be planted out bareroot. I'll leave them there for 7 days and then out they go:

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    Jackfruit coming on:

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    Pollard/coppice Tipuana growing under another Tipuana. Considering it gets full shade, that's a years growth:

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  2. Australian Beekeeper

    Australian Beekeeper Junior Member

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    Looking great. Jaboticaba always looks so odd/different to me. I have one planted but no flowers/fruit this year and don't expect any for the next few years. How long did your trees take?
     
  3. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Inherited Jaboticaba. Probably in the 10-15 year range. They been planted close together to form a hedge and compete with bamboo. Could be 20 years max.
     
  4. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper Senior Member

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    My one took about 8 to 10 years to fruit
    Another one I have is over 12 years still no fruit.
     
  5. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    Occupation:
    gardening, reading, etc
    Location:
    near St. Charles, MI, USoA
    Home Page:
    Climate:
    -15C-35C, 10cm rain/mo, clay, full sun, K-G Dfa=x=Dfb
    i love the look of them when fruiting, first time i've ever seen them. : ) enjoy!
     
  6. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    One part of the nursery, due to lack of space they get sun-hardened almost instantly. This is just one part, I'm standing above more trays and there are many on the side of house too:

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    Trialling Moringa in a bigger airpruning pot:

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    Grasshoppers and powdery mildew putting an end to the Cucumbers, harvested at least 50 or so. Eldest daughter eats them as snacks so that's a good sign. Luffa travelling miles per day:

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    Good-sized Christmas Melon coming on. This is the first and biggest (bigger than a hand):

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    Harvested so heavily from this on New Years Eve and fed an entire party of 5 sets of families and kids. Can't even tell now! Regularly feeding us and neighbours from the 2 beds. Very pleased with the performance:

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  7. Chookie

    Chookie Junior Member

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    Wow looking great! Any way around the mildew problems besides keeping them out of the rain?
     
  8. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Better circulation of air, growing up rather than down, addition of Sulfate of Potash (already done once), lower humidity, no overhead watering (wasn't happening).

    Lying all over the ground, with other plants tangled within is a recipe for disaster. All that rain and the very sticky conditions didn't help. I knew it was going to be a problem but that's ok, I will cut out the cucumbers and add compost to the bed so the Luffa can put on some good fruit for sponges for the next year. I'll rest this bed after the Loofah is done and grow green manure over it for one season, try and improve the OM and break up the medium sand (couldn't get coarse for addition to the soil). I want to replace the soil for coarse sand but I will live with it.
     
  9. Chookie

    Chookie Junior Member

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    Cheers SOP, Ive never had to deal with these wet conditions before, so it's helpful to hear how others are tackling some of the problems with it :y:
     
  10. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Watched a video of Rob Bob today, his cucumbers were grown vertically (3 different varieties) and some were near death. Just one of those things.
     
  11. Australian Beekeeper

    Australian Beekeeper Junior Member

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    Looking great! Those air pruning pots look interesting. I used to muck around with bonsai and used to use plastic strainers for the same purpose. I never knew such a pot actually existed or are those something you made/reused yourself?

    The mildew is getting my pumpkins now too. No biggie they are pretty much full size anyway and were mainly grown for seed purposes.
     
  12. Chookie

    Chookie Junior Member

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    Hadn't heard of RobBob but checked it out on youtube and he has some pretty good vids, a few to get through though lol
     
  13. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    What have I done recently? Not much.

    I mowed the lawn:

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    I glanced at the Ottochloa gracillima's rampant growth with the rain we have had:

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    Pinto enjoying the weather too. Maybe I'll be lucky and it will start taking over the lawn as well:

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    A choko up an Acacia, looking for available vertical space that could possibly withstand a choko is hard:

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    Flowering Buckinghamias are a favourite with the local wildlife:

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    And more wildlife harvesting undesirable seeds. Does anybody want a thousand Cadagi seeds? I have plenty of seedlings popping up everywhere too:

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  14. Australian Beekeeper

    Australian Beekeeper Junior Member

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    That is one good looking curb! Bugger about the cadagi seeds. Do you ever actually find them to be a problem there? They always collect plenty here but no issues.
     
  15. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Well, no, not really an issue. I've seen some splits where the hives have an entire area devoted to them so potentially it could reduce internal space but they don't seem to care.

    All I'm worried about is now I need to keep my eye on between Lomandra and in the dirt beds. I know if I left here, the garden would end up climaxing in Chinese Elm and Cadagi.

    Cheated with the naturestrip, planted the street trees earlier and then wattles up on the wall. Covered that whole area in less than 2 years. I don't think I've seen an enclosed strip anywhere around here so I've got that going for me, which is nice. The Dianella struggled as I had to plant them into the drought to free up space and they have been hit and miss since. Pinto should replace a lot of them and I have 9 cuttings of Warrigal Greens to go in between. Other side is Lomandra and variegated Liriope.
     
  16. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper Senior Member

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  17. Australian Beekeeper

    Australian Beekeeper Junior Member

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    That has been the long held hypothesis. It is one of those things, I have read about it since day dot and see my bees collect craploads of the stuff but haven't lost a hive/seen detrimental effects from it (that I can tell). There was a paper published in 2001 about the problem by Wallace and Howell that may have some conclusions but I haven't read it unfortunately.Here is a pic I took of a honey/pollen filled soft split this morning (aren't holidays great). You can see how many of the seeds they collect.. And the hive is fine :)

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  18. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Air-pruning pot comparo. Same batch of seed, same sized plant moved in on the same day. Reasonably even height, one slightly more branched than the other. One type of pot higher quality and probably much more expensive. Root development different but still mostly air-pruned and ready for planting.

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  19. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    My partner had the camera today, I'm the lump on the broadfork. Planting at the wrong time of the day but you do what you have to do.

    Main things are we've nearly finished our Vetiver bare-root line at the very bottom of the property. Not on contour and windy but it won't matter years from now. This will keep foot and vehicle traffic out of the TPZ (tree protection zones) of our lower bee planting. Other thing of note is 18 Coffee trees have gone in under a Tipuana. I've been nursing these things in pots for WAY TOO long. Potting mix had rotted and gone anaerobic and the root zone had retreated back to the top third of the pot. Fingers crossed on that one.

    Good news is that I've potentially sold my entire Vetiver crop. Ethics dictates I sell it cheap as I have a full-time job and it will go to a site that I will get to drive past frequently so share the surplus I reckon. I'm thinking 20c a plant will get me even if I put a cheap hourly rate on the effort (and chicken manure) I've expended in getting it going (and future division).

    Deer got the top of the Mulberries too. The guards are 6-7ft high. Temporary electric fencing is my plan in the next couple of years.

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  20. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Forgot this one. I had leaned some bags of sawdust chicken manure against some rocks near to a Grevillia robusta (Silky Oak). Combine rain and you get quite the display of proteoid roots. Coming out through mortared cracks as well. Inside the bag was a good display of roots too. Tells me I need to cut the Silky Oak out as it's right next to a Tahitian Lime and must be sucking the area dry.

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