What can I do about invasive ferns

Discussion in 'Put Your Questions to the Experts!' started by Yuca_Rainbow, Sep 30, 2018.

  1. Yuca_Rainbow

    Yuca_Rainbow New Member

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    Hello permies

    we are an alternative community ( https://es.gofundme.com/rainbow-crystal-land-magic-hat )

    And we have a lot of ferns and they are so invasive. They overgrow everything and we cant seem to push them back, I tried sheet mulching but they penetrate through the sheets. We digged the roots up which is a lot of effort and disturbs the soil a lot and they grow back from the sides.
    Does anybody has ideas what we could do about them?

    Thank you
     
  2. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    Some fern species are a lot like bamboo in that they can reproduce at rhizome junctions (joints) and that makes them very hard to eliminate. So, first thing to do is determine if you have one of those species you will need to do a proper excavation, digging down around the plant's stalk until you find the root system and lift it from the soil as intact as possible, thick "runners" coming off the main stem will be the key. If you have one of these species, digging the whole thing up will be about the only way to get rid of it so it won't continue to come back.

    If it isn't one of these species, then cutting at ground level, every time fiddle heads appear will eventually wear the root system out and it will die off.
    You can also change the pH of the soil which will make fern survival far less likely, this usually takes a 2 whole point shift in pH. (most ferns like basic soils but a few like acidic soils so at least a litmus paper pH test is advisable prior to making any pH shift.)
     

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