Water tanks and preliminary calculations

Discussion in 'Designing, building, making and powering your life' started by waynemus, May 4, 2007.

  1. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    g'day greeny,

    dams can be an option in a water management plant, but they are not going to suit all applications, simply pushing up a mound of dirt to create a wall and a hole behind it is a bit more simple than it realy is.

    like your tank experience dams are a definite buyer beware or buyer be fully informed. not all land can support a dam because the soil won't hold water in a dam configeration, you need clay sub soil to make a good water holding dam. i know many people who can't put a dam in because the soil isn't suitable.

    then you will still get situations where some dams never seem to run dry (they are built in exactly the right place) and others after long periods without rain are little more than mud puddles. then there is the evaporation factor.

    with poly tanks yes you need to buy from quality makers, and yes you can use brand names as far as i can see, why not? let others know which is better than an another.

    poly tanks don't need fancy stand or platforms just a good bed of stoneless soil will do.

    len
     
  2. greeny

    greeny Junior Member

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    Ok Gardenlen, I didn't expect I would have to spell out my opinions for the idiots. If you have deep sand don't make a dam. OK?
    And for the absolute idiots please don't put a dam on a flat piece of ground, or on a quarter acre block. OK?
    Tanks are great. I would prefer concrete tank on stable ground personally, and even cra like the plastic fantastic Tankmasta , which may last 10 years if you are lucky before they need replacing are better than nothing.
    I am happy to have two tanks myself. I feel that water is the basis for survival and we will soon be depending more on our own grown produce so rainwater tanks will probably not be sufficient. In Australia this year, because of climate change/drought they are expecting food prices to soar as we import more food. But how will increasing fuel prices affect Australia's ability to import cheaply. My guess is things are going to be changing soon. And once it starts suddenly people will be struggling to make ends meet. Many jobs will be lost and economic recession will follow rapidly. Social security will fail as will super. That we will be able to depend on savings is not at all secure ,..or is whether those savings will have any value. What will be valuable is water and the ability to grow food.
    Lets hope the tank holds enough water to maintain your food production and doesn't hit its use by date and need replacing because things are going to change in other ways soon.
    Plastic tanks are made from petroleum , made with petroleum and transported by petroleum and petroleum is running out and everything depending on it in a big way will soon be very very expensive.
    All tanks require much resources in manufacturing and transportation they need replacing . So please think about a dam again.

    If you have a property that can take a dam, and you care for the future, yours and those following you then a dam is a caring and longterm solution. Oh I should say pay only the most reputed professional dam maker.
     
  3. frosty

    frosty Junior Member

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    of course you can always use a poly dam liner :wink:

    we have 2 tanks 1 transportable concrete 27000 litres - 1 plastic 23000 l .......... I dont like the plastic one and wont drink water that has been in it ( it also tastes bad a well as being unhealthy )

    when we wanted more storage for fire fighting we put in a small 40000 litre dam using a polyliner and it was much cheaper and looks much nicer than another tank :D

    frosty
     
  4. ho-hum

    ho-hum New Member

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    One of the very important strategies not mentioned here is water storage in the soil profile. Not all water needs to be stored in, for want of a better phrase, liquid form that we can access for drinking etc.

    For anywhere that is suitable for a dam site is also suitable to use swales, ditches, banks etc to give the water time to enter the soil profile. Look up the Keyline system or search this site for geoff lawton's work in Jordan to see how this can be done.

    Home gardeners should look for Jeremy Coleby-Williams website in Brisbane to see what he has achieved by simply inverting garden beds and using them to catch rain and not drain it away. He has comprehensively listed a lot of home garden type strategies to assist this.

    An anecdote for you. Over my property every year after huge rains a river forms about 50 yards wide and 3-4'' deep. That just misses my lawn by a few feet. One year about 15 years ago a locust plague of the hopper size followed this path upriver across the property eating the tiny green new shoots yet none of them left this path and got on the lawn which was well watered and green.

    floot
     
  5. lezstar

    lezstar Junior Member

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    solar energy

    just a quick correction here to wayne its was probably just a typo error but its SLIVER solar technology, not silver as for your old man good to hear he is coming around to your way of thinking on the water tank issue,check out a bloke from west australia called max whisson his desal ideas are hard to fault in overall "DOABILITY", we cant wait much longer to do something about this extended drought/climate change thing.cya lez
     
  6. ppp

    ppp Junior Member

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    The post stating that the energy used in transporting water is more than for desalination is WRONG. The high cost of desalinated water is due to the amount of energy used. If the energy allready being used was so large, we would be paying those high prices already.

    However, I think that our current dams should be MORE THAN SUFFICIENT.

    I don't know if anyone has noticed, but in many Australian capital cities (Brisbane, Sydney etc) even for a modest sized tank say, 10 000L even for all water useage needs, depending on rainfall, it will be full almost all of the time.

    The solution, I beleive is:
    - get as big a tank as possible, and use it for ALL of your water needs.
    - only use town water when this runs dry.

    I am happy to go into the numbers with people, but I think that for, say, 20 000L tank, around 70 - 90% of your water will be from the tank, and the large town supplies are only used for "Deep storage" or longterm storage.

    The amount of town wate being used, when everyone's tanks are overflowing, is alarming.
     
  7. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    we have a 25k litre tank, that makes us self reliant so far, along with the 200 litre drums all works well.

    15 to 25 k/litre tanks are good sizes for the average home. we have app' 100 sq/mtrs of collection area for the tank so every 10mm of rain gives us app' 1k litres of water in the tank.

    len
     

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