Very limited space in veg / fruit garden (UK) what spacing can I have?

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Diggman, May 22, 2014.

  1. Diggman

    Diggman Junior Member

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    Hi all,

    So I have the following space available with the option to building another (but smaller) raised bed in the empty area on the right of the raised bed (RB):

    View attachment 2536

    • The white empty space is both cement slabs (small patio) and lawn,
    • The three other beds are borders that were installed already with what looks like a treated hardwood border edge,
    • One 210 ltr rain harvest butt,
    • Garden has about 1.5m tall fencing surrounding it,
    • The sun comes from top and runs along the right side until the house shades the garden,
    • Still at the moment the right border bed doesn't catch any sun due to the fence (but it is close) June 21 = Summer solstice.

      I have some fruit trees in pots, all my spuds are in pots, some fruit bushes (gooseberry, raspberry, blueberry etc), There are some ornamental plants / shrubs (but not many) already installed, a small worm bin with tea tank that looks like it has about 5 ltrs of tea and another small compost bin that is doing badly (too wet, stinky)

      Planned to plant in the beds / borders:
      Aubergines, tomatoes, beans, corn, winter squashes / pumpkins, butternut squashes, summer squashes, sweet peppers, kales, lettuices, spinach, beets, rocket, radish, small cabbages, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, peanuts, peas, onions, herbs, watermelon, sweet melon, strawbs, marigolds, sunflowers, jerusalem artichokes (already growing 4 on left border bed almost at fence in centre in a row and 2 in centre top border bed + 6 in pots for friends / fam)

      since I have such a small space, what spacing can I get away with between peppers, aubergines, peas (2x bush variety), peanuts, beets, lettuces etc? I plan on vertically growing all of the winter squashes, butternuts and melon - the corn will be the 3 sisters method in 3 - 4 separate areas but not in the raised bed due to height (want to install a polytunnel on top).

      Hmm, I didnt plan on going that far, seems like I should have rather posted this in members systems? :D
     

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  2. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Think about the growth habit of each plant and plant accordingly. You are on the right track with the 3 sisters approach. You could grow kale under peas, strawberries under brussels sprouts, watermelon under sunflowers. Timing is also worth thinking about. Radishes are fast to get to harvest so you could grow them amongst something that is slow growing and takes up more space - as you will have the radishes out in time for the other plant (e.g. cabbage) to reach full size.

    The concept is called stacking in time and space.
    From The urban farmer principle 6.

    How successful you are also depends on how much sunlight you have, how much water and the quality of your soil so there are no hard and fast answers. You'll need to use a process of trial and error to figure it out. Best to over plant and then thin out as you go, particularly with things like radishes where you can eat the thinned out crop. Have something ready to go in the empty hole whenever you harvest something and keep in mind good principles of crop rotation (e.g. don't plant eggplant after tomato after potato as they all share the same pests as members of the tobacco family).
     
  3. linasteve

    linasteve Junior Member

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    You can try coco peat to improve the soil quality. Coco peat can be beneficial for plants as it contains balanced pH and proper amount of fertilizers which encourages healthy growth of plants. As suggested by eco, crop rotation is also a good option to get maximum out of limited space.
     
  4. bazman

    bazman Junior Member

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  5. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    the other aspect of crop rotation that isn't often mentioned is that different types of plants also use different amounts and kinds of nutrients from the soil. so to rotate is to also even out different types of nutrient depletion and give the soil some time to replenish itself. also consider the depth of rooting as those plants that can get roots down deeper will help bring up nutrients from down deeper when chopped and dropped.
     
  6. linasteve

    linasteve Junior Member

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    Agree with you. Different crops need different nutrients and due to this, the soil starts getting degraded. I read some useful tips to improve the quality of soil at https://issuu.com/bioactivepeat/docs/5_simple_ways_to_improve_the_qualit
     
  7. Diggman

    Diggman Junior Member

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    Great! thanks everyone, looks like I've got some good reading to do now :)
     
  8. DiklipDut

    DiklipDut Group for banned users

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    Dissolve the boundaries of the garden - it means to make sure that they were not too noticeable. Especially emphasizes, "showing" these borders fence. And if your site is very small, you will immediately see the entire fence, and there will be a feeling of tightness, stiffness. The easiest and most beautiful way to hide the fence - to decorate his plants: trees, shrubs, and flowers.
     

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