vermicast solution search comes up with zip

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by useful gardener, Oct 12, 2005.

  1. useful gardener

    useful gardener New Member

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    i was suprised to get only one match for "vermicast" and none with solution. if anyone has been making the solution (as explained in David Murphy's excellent book organic farming with worms) how long will it keep without feeding it. how much should you feed it to keep microorganism count maxed. does it help to keep it warm or is that just to get the popultion explosion?
     
  2. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    g'day usefulgardener,

    don't know if this will help but along permaculture productivity principals i cut out the middle men (term) in my gardening that is got rid of the compost pile/bin and worm farm this all now happens in my raised garden beds.

    as i use green mulches ie.,. hays or pasture grasses and i use grey water in the vege beds plus i put our kitchen scraps and bury the frozen cane toads in the beds all this keeps the composting worms now in the garden beds along with the other worms exotic or native very well fed so as our gardens produce good product i would say that we must be feeding the soil because it is certainly feeding us.

    also all spent seasonal crops/prunnings from nitrogen fixers anything gets shredded and put back on the beds or broken up and done the same with. i generally lay that scrap type stuff under the 6 to 8" layer of mulch hay that way you can plant seedling through it without waiting for buried scraps to break down usually about 2 weeks.

    anyhow mate whoever it works for me, yeh who realy wants to run a worm farm or turn a compost pile and then try and keep it hot enough :( ?? if they don't ahve to, i get the worm wee and casting right where it is needed, and i get a good supply of free composting worms for our drop toilet :shock: (they create worm wee in the bins which is added to the gardens nothing is wasted too) all of which ends up back in the garden great hey.

    len :D 8) :lol:
     
  3. Sly712

    Sly712 Junior Member

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    :lol:
     
  4. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    yep sly712,

    best damn blood and bone fert' you can get free and fresh, thanks be to the great minds of science.

    len :D :D 8)
     
  5. Ichsani

    Ichsani Junior Member

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    Hi useful Gardener, (love the name!)

    Am a bit of a fan of that wonderful book...! Culturing microbs is suprisingly easy, and they're resilient little buggers :lol: , for some slightly esoteric info on culture methods check out some biodynamic farming sites and have a look at their methods for making BD500.....essentially the same process....and no you don't need to chant over them but it can't hurt! (microbes from the cowhorns as starter culture.....will be quite similar to soil mirobes from worms, the same I'd say but I haven't tested that bit yet, have to wait until I graduate I think :lol: ).

    Warmth increases the growth rate, as long as the feeding ratio is right (Murphy gives some amounts in his book doesn't he?), and cold shocks or running out of food will cause the microbes to sporolate...meaning that when the solution is applied they'll wake up and party :wink:

    Storing culture for a long time will force the population into death phase as their by products buid up and act as toxins, so fresh is better.....spreading the castings will also spread the microbes but culturing allows greater numbers and wider applications. Note that these little critters like organic matter and building up the OG simultaneuosly (sp?) will kick start the accumulation of living soil.

    If I can work out how to post photos I've got a pearler from the Mumbil salinity research station that I took a few weeks ago.....trees with Frankia (N fixing microbes) and without....the ones with were twice the size and better colour, same species too only 1.5m from each other (salinity sterilizes the soil so in these conditions they don't travel from tree to tree and have to be inoculated)....cool stuff in a bad situation.

    I think that bale boy was doing some culturing, he might have some tips...there's a thread on this topic a ways back that has the title of Murphy's book.... Hope some of that helps... let us know how it goes...and remember to be careful with the stuff...soil microbes are a very varied bunch... and selective spectrum culture focuses on the goodies but don't go snorting the stuff...there's some nasties in soil (and at roughly 1bill cells per cm^2 in living(!) soil there's always variety).....

    These guys can fix more N and make more P available than current commercial applications p/ha on convential farms (in order of 100's of kg p/ha) but once again the soil has to have either some org. matter or clays to bind the nutrients so the plants can get them, and no high powered applicators as they pulverise the cells! :?

    Len, your garden sounds cool....and that's the BEST use for cane toads that I've ever heard of! It even beats using the for golf practice! :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

    Cheers
    Ichsani
     

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