Veggies from garden!

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by living simple, Jan 30, 2006.

  1. living simple

    living simple Junior Member

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    Hi all,

    I just wanted to brag basically!

    Last night at meal time was the first time in our lives where all the veggies we ate on our plate, was picked from our garden!!! The corn was fantastic!!!!! We also had potatoes, zucchini, beans, and carrots. To top it off, we 'pigged out' on rhubarb (but with sugar and cream!!) We also picked 4 tomatoes (first ever tomatoes grown for us!). It has been a long, slow process for us to get to this point in our lives, but it really felt worth it yesterday! I also bottled 22 jars of beetroot and made 9 jars of beetroot chutney. Am looking forward to when the pumpkins produce! Yum. Oh, how i wish i was home full-time!

    Well, thanks for letting me have a moment of pride!

    Cheers
    Lyn

    p.s
    I'm new to cooking rhubarb - can anyone tell me if it's meant to go REALLY mushy when boiled?? I like to peel the skin off, then cut it into 2cm pieces and boil for about 4-5 minutes. Is there a trick to keeping it in it's shape?
     
  2. seussrules

    seussrules Junior Member

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    Good on you, Lyn! We are on a small inner-urban plot and we too are just experiencing the joys of our first harvest. I feel ridiculously self-righteous and proud every time we eat a meal, although we are not at the point of full garden self-sufficiencyyet.

    Beetroot chutney sounds good. Do you have a recipe?

    :)
     
  3. billybuttongirl

    billybuttongirl Junior Member

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    Great stuff Lyn! We've got a small 1/2 acre place on the outskirts of melbourne and i am just so excited about my vegie patch too. I rush out there every day after work. I had a similar boast to you over the weekend - i'd made a lovely zucchini tart from the ones in my garden and the beetroot, bean and rocket salad was all out of my garden. Anyone into beetroot - you must try the coloured heirloom seed mix - gorgeous pink, orange and white beets!

    rhubarb def goes mushy on cooking. Somtimes i put quarted apples in to give it some structure. You don't need to peel it, often its the skin which will be reddest, and it softens on cooking. check out this site for everything rhubarb, theres some recipes at the end.
    https://www.rhubarbinfo.com/

    i constantly lament not being able to to be home all the time too!

    cheers,
    Billybuttongirl
     
  4. Franceyne

    Franceyne Junior Member

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    Congratulations Lyn! It is a wonderful feeling eating that which you have nurtured and grown for your very own :D

    Stewed rhubarb to me is mostly just broken down with the occasional more solid bit...I don't remove the skin though.

    cheers,
    Fran.
     
  5. mariet

    mariet Junior Member

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    home picked veges

    Well done Lyn, it's great feeling knowing you've grown it all yourself. And doesn't it taste wonderful?!! I'm sure that the freshness accounts for most of the energy in food. When you pick things and they go straight into the gob its the best. We made a new rule at our house, things don't get picked and sit around inside to share, it's pick your own and eat.
    Growing your own is contagious and still just as exciting years later, for me anyway. It's now 4 years since I've regularly bought veges. Until last year I bought a bag of onions and a bag of potatoes every winter. Last year it was just a bag of onions. I have bought some cherries this summer but no need to buy any other fruit and veg. We just cook with what we have instead of thinking shops. It does make you very fussy though. Bought food just doesn't have it. I'm now so into my food I will take cold veges to work for luch. Even cold kipfler potatoes and cold broad beans with a bit of goat's milk fetta, some lemon myrtle powder and good olive oil is heaven. For all those extra zucchinis we found the most wonderful recipe for a zucchini pickle. I will post it later. Even 2 of my young nephews insisted on having them in their school lunches with cheese every day. Keep up the good work, all you fellow vege growers. It's worth all the hard slog, Marie
     
  6. billybuttongirl

    billybuttongirl Junior Member

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    Hi Marie,
    Eagerly awaiting the zucchini pickle recipe!!!! We have heaps of them coming up, seems like they grow overnight! I bottled a coupel last night, just in the 50% vinegar/water solution FV recommend with a bay leaf, so not very imaginative.

    Billybuttongirl
     
  7. living simple

    living simple Junior Member

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    Veggies from garden.

    Thanks for the encouragment guys! Had more rhubarb last night, and more corn - way too yummy! I don't ever remember corn tasting sooooo good!

    Seussrules
    The recipe i use for Beetroot Chutney is:

    900g raw beetroot, grated (i use the mouli grinder!)
    500g onion. chopped
    685g cooking apples, peeled cored and chopped finely
    350g seedless raisins
    1 L Malt Vinegar
    900g granulated sugar
    2 Tbsp ground ginger

    Place all ingredients in a large pan and boil. The simmer for 1-2 hours or until thick and pulpy. Preserve. (Sometimes i add a little cornflour to help with the thickening!!)

    mariet
    Would love that zucchini pickle recipe! Hubby bought in another 2 off the bush last night - lordy, how fast they grow!! And you're right, it is worth the hard slog!

    billybuttongirl
    Thanks for the rhubarb link - very informative! And it's nice to know i'm not the only one who is a part-time gardener! Everyone who is a bit 'alternative minded' seems to be able to stay home full-time! How is that possible? *mental note to self* I need to work from home somehow??!
     
  8. mariet

    mariet Junior Member

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    Here is the zucchini pickle recipe. Sorry, I shouldn't have let even an hour lapse before giving the recipe. We all know how fast zucchinis grow!
    6 cups sliced zucchinis (best done with the food processor), sprinkle with salt and leave to stand 2 hours.
    3 sliced onions,
    2 cups sugar,
    2 cups cider vinegar,
    2 tsp mustard seed,
    1 tsp celery seed,
    1 tsp tumeric.
    Bring pickling ingredients to the boil, add onions and gently boil 10 mins. strain and rinse the zucchini well ( one batch was disgustingly salty, I think it was because we used rock salt and maybe more difficult to wash off). Add washed zucchini. When boiling again remove from heat. Use sterilised jars, preferably with plastic lids but not essential.
    These are FANTASTIC in the old classic toasted cheese sandwich. We used to buy eggplant pickles but no more. Enjoy
     
  9. living simple

    living simple Junior Member

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    veggies from garden

    Hi mariet,

    Thanks for the recipe - it sounds wonderful! I know i'm gonna sound silly, but i've got a quick question. . .

    when you say you use the food processor for the zucchini, do you mean that you just throw in the 6 cups and chop it all up into small pieces, or do you use the special attachment which chops the zucchini up into nice fine 'ring slices'?

    Sorry, maybe i'm being a bit dumb today, but i'd like to have my first batch turn out half decent!

    Thanks again,

    Cheers
    Lyn
     
  10. Rob6014

    Rob6014 Junior Member

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    And don't they taste so much better! :D There is no comparison between the fresh picked from your garden, and the been-in-the-shop for weeks fruit and vegetables. Just wait until you have tased your first tree-ripened apple. You will never be able to eat one of those tasteless shop ones again. And if I tell you that all apples have 24 sprays on them before they get to the shop, you will probably be less inclined to eat them. We used to be apple orchardists, and we don't eat shop-apples. They are picked green, and dipped in fungicide before being waxed and sold. Yum yum!
     
  11. mariet

    mariet Junior Member

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    veges from the garden

    Sorry Lyn, I should have been more clear about that. all questions are good. It was my husband who decided to use the fine slicing ring on the food processor. So for a really big zucchini you might have to quarter it to fit into the food processor. Just that the lovely thin slices seem to go best.
    Rob you might also have some information for me about that first apple. I posted a question about codlin moth. Not sure whether I need to throw away those precious first apples as they have codlin or is there some way I can get to eat them? I need all the information I can get. Thanks
     
  12. Rob6014

    Rob6014 Junior Member

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    Mariet, you can buy codlin moth traps to put in the tree - they are very successful. We have a spot on an old (abandoned) farm where we get pears and quinces - they usually have a bit of codlin moth, but I just cut it out. The pears have about 50% codlin moth, and of those effected, about 2% are so bad they get thrown out. (The cows like them though...) The quinces get a bit more, but as they are so hard, the damage dowsn't seem to be as bad.

    The damage depends on how many codlin you get in the fruit. They eat their way to the core of the fruit, so most damage is at the core. 3 codlin is too many. Most fruit has only one moth. I am not sure what you want to do with your apples - eating them fresh with codlin moth might be a bit of a challenge. We like our apples to be on the tree until the first frost, when they sweeten up and are just beautiful, but if they have codlin, the damage would probably be too great by then. Tree ripened apples make the best apple crisps, and you can use the syrup to make tart tartin.
     
  13. mariet

    mariet Junior Member

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    veges from the garden!

    Thanks Rob, I only have probably 20 apples on all the trees in total. I'm sure we will just eat them. I usually have my favourite roadside apples to visit for a greater supply. Last year was just phenomonal!!
    We seemed to eat the most delicious apples wherever we went. Maybe I just followed the apple trail. I will try the codlin moth trap. I will also make a cage for the chooks and put them under the apple trees during autumn and winter.
     
  14. living simple

    living simple Junior Member

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    Zucchini Pickle

    Hi Mariet,

    I'm going to make my first batch of zucchini pickle tonight. (I'm nearly going to have to move out of the house with the amount of zucchinis i'm bringing up from the garden!)

    When the recipe says 'mustard seed' - is that dry seeds? or mustard seed paste? I'm sure it really wouldn't make a difference, but like i've said before i'm new to this great gardening thing and, in turn, new to bottling/cooking!

    Hope you're having a great day . . .

    Cheers
    Lyn
     
  15. mariet

    mariet Junior Member

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    veges from the garden!

    Hi Lyn, it is dry mustard seed. It probably wouldn't make any difference. But you never can be sure. I think I said that we made one batch and when it came to salt all the salt I could find in the house waas the bag of rock salt I had used to salt olives. I decided not to throw it out but to reuse it. It wasn't dirty, just preloved. I don't think it had anything to do with the fact that it had been used for olives, more that the lumps of salt didn't rinse out of the colander. My husband said he had rinsed well, but somehow they were VERY salty and no good to eat. So you can't be too careful. Good luck and enjoy! Best on a really good bread with cheese!!
     
  16. seussrules

    seussrules Junior Member

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    Thanks for the chutney recipe, Lyn. I have been away and only just noticed it. I have just acquired a fowlers vacola preserving unit, and am fired up to preserve. I can see a cookerama fest brewing this weekend...
     

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