Trees with wet feet

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Tegs, May 15, 2010.

  1. Tegs

    Tegs Junior Member

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    I am looking for some suggestions for trees that are happy in soggy ground and that are suited to our sub-tropical climate. I have dug a swale/ ditch that fills up with the overflow from our dam. On the high side I have planted banana, sweet potato, lemongrass and paw paw. I just don't know what to plant on the low side. It is very flat with quite a heavy soil and when the swale is full water sits in this area. It can go several weeks without drying out during the wet season. The swale runs right along the paddock boundary with the low side located in the paddock. I will fence the new planting off temporarily but whatever is planted there needs to stand up to grazing once established. I look forward to hearing your suggestions :)
     
  2. Speedy

    Speedy Junior Member

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    Trees-
    Melaleuca spp., M.leucedenron, M.quinquinervium
    Taxodium mucronatum, T.disticum.

    You could try some native riparian zone rainforest species.
    Again, plant them a little above the wet zone and
    maybe allow some sedges, reeds or rushes to grow and provide habitat in the wet zone.


    or Grass- The big stuff!
    Guadua angustifolia- it's branches can be a bit thorny down low esp in the early years and help protect it from grazing.
    Guadua could be planted a bit above the really wet area and allowed th grow into it over time.
    It's not a running bamboo but the clumps do spread more than most clumpers.
    The elongated rhizome necks mean the culms are nicely spaced and allow for easier harvesting.
    in say 8yrs you'll be able to start to harvest some nice building material.


    just a few sugestions...
     
  3. butchasteve

    butchasteve Junior Member

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    good suggestions speedy..

    I feel Mel quins are more suited to very wet feet than luecodendrons. just an observation.

    Lomandras, common as muck but go together with Melaleuca's like.... well.. things that go together..

    Casuararina's (not sure which of the 2 common ones, will look it up). They are common in marshland in the subtropics, and they are nitrogen fixers. Make sure you plant them in the dry though. i have had plenty die on me when their feet are too wet when they havn't taken off yet, strange but just an observation after losing 100's over the years.

    Warrigal greens, they thrive in tidal wetlands, they tolerate lots of water (even salty or brackish). probably best to plant this on the outer edges as its low growing and constant complete submersion may be a death sentence. grows fairly quick though so should bounce back.

    Kungevoi?? its rumoured you can make a spinach from the leaves after boiling several times to remove the alkaloids. NOTE! it is rumoured, don't try it on my suggestion, its poisonous.

    ever though of trying some wild rice? not sure on what why or how but just popped into my head..

    I'd say if there is enough room go for a variety.
     
  4. Yukkuri_Kame

    Yukkuri_Kame Junior Member

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    Willows love water and have several uses. Various crafts. Bee forage. Rooting hormone derived from the tips. Not sure about domestic animals but moose and deer like them.

    I like the bamboo idea.
     
  5. Yukkuri_Kame

    Yukkuri_Kame Junior Member

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    Have a couple of Moringa O. seedlings in pots. Lower leaves are turning yellow and falling off. Wet feet?
     
  6. permup

    permup Junior Member

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    I like the bamboo idea too, however here are a few botanical names I've found for wet sites:
    Alnus, Amelanchier, Betula (some), Clethra, Cornus, Crataegus (some), Gaultheria, Ilex, Lyonia, Mespilus, Metasequoia glyptostroboides, Myrica, Photinia, Physocarpus, Populus, Pyrus, Salix, Sambucus, Sorbaria, Sorbus aucuparia, Spiraea, Symphoricarpos, Taxodium, Vaccinium, Virbunum (some).
    Best of luck.
     
  7. Tegs

    Tegs Junior Member

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    Thanks for the suggestions everyone. I think I will go with bamboo to create a dense edible screen.

    I already have one well established clump of bamboo on the property, any tips on how I can propagate from it? Please don't say I have to dig up one of the canes, that would be a mammoth task!
     
  8. Speedy

    Speedy Junior Member

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    You can grow most of the big clumping species by cuttings.
    If it's a big very old clump, then it's very likely Bambusa balcooa.
    It's the most common and well established species seen along the east coast.

    Although it's a clumping species it grows a bit big with branches growing from very low
    on the culms and is very prone to lodging making it difficult to harvest.
    There are plenty of far more managable species available in Aus. now.
    I'd go for one of the better ones.
     
  9. aroideana

    aroideana Junior Member

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    Taro would grow great in the deepest wettest spot , and should do OK in sub-tropics .
     

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