Trees for dry temperate region

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by our eden, Jul 22, 2010.

  1. our eden

    our eden Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2008
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Portugal
    Home Page:
    Climate:
    Warm Mediterranean
    hi , i'm looking to compile a list of trees that would be suitable to plant in a dry temperate region. We are in south west Portugal and are readying ourselves for the autumn tree planting. If anyone has any suggestions of trees or anywhere such a list already exists on the net i would be very grateful.
    Thanks, Josh
     
  2. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    2,721
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    inland Otago, NZ
    Climate:
    Inland maritime/hot/dry/frosty
    What are the trees for? Food forest? Wind break? Shade? Wildlife habitat? Fodder? How bit an area is being planted? What sort of condition is the land in? Will it be irrigated?
     
  3. Speedy

    Speedy Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    233
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    And what soil type is it?
    whats the annual rainfall there and when throughout the year do you get it?
     
  4. our eden

    our eden Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2008
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Portugal
    Home Page:
    Climate:
    Warm Mediterranean
    I'll try an answer your questions to the best of my knowledge, to start the land here is big ,30h, 20 of which is drained wet land that edges on to an estuary that was historically used as rice paddies and salt pans. so salt tolerance is important for any trees that are planted down there. the rest of the land is south east facing hillside (so good sun ward aspect). the soil shows signs of mild alkalinity and local stone is lime, it is heavy with a lot of clay content.
    As to what the trees are for, all of those thing and more, the land is barren and dry and in dire need for reafforestation, it has very few trees, some carob, olive and almond.
    Irrigation is not a problem as there is many sources of fresh water on site, an agricultural water channel passes though the site, there are many tanks and wells and also we have plans to put in a swale system to rehydrate the land.
    The annual rainfall is hard to predict, in the last 5 years we have swung from sever drought to floods, this last year we had higher rainfall than in the last 70 years, there seems to be no accurate average annual rainfall.

    i am already compiling a list of trees from the books i have but any suggested spp would be a great help
     
  5. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2006
    Messages:
    4,771
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Always a good idea to look at the plants that were historically once there eg
    Oaks, olives, Strawberry tree.

    Do you have a normal Mediterranean clime?
    If so, look to plants grown in similar areas of the planet (Perth WA, Adelaide SA, Tasmania, SA? California )
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Trees_of_Mediterranean_climate

    https://www.daleysfruit.com.au/my/myedibles/AU/VIC/delivery/mediterranean/

    https://www.eastofedenplants.co.uk/buy_trees_uk.htm
     
  6. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,676
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    What an interesting problem you have to solve. I would enjoy working out that but unfortuantley, its too far from my own experience to be able to offer you much of interest. I reckon though that for research you should consult some experts in soil regeneration. But i'd agree with michaelangelo that ultimately you should be looking to what's historically from that area as it will deal best with your conditions. Except if you want food trees. But certainly it would be a mistake to trees in that we would use for the same spot in Australia. You can end up wiht worse headaches that way. There must be local trees that are salt tolerant etc. I would consult your local departments of Agriculture and also France would probably have some good knowledge on such things as they are near you and have modern ideas. I've no idea what the portuguuese take on agriculture is like these days but its worth a try. Ask at the universities where there are agricultural and soil science people. They should have good knowledge of suitable species and also how to deal with such soils.
     
  7. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2006
    Messages:
    4,771
    Likes Received:
    10
    Trophy Points:
    0
  8. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    2,721
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    inland Otago, NZ
    Climate:
    Inland maritime/hot/dry/frosty
    What are you planning for the land near the estuary? Do you want it to become wetland again? Can you find out what natives in your area would grow there?

    I agree with MA - find out what already grows there as an initial approach.

    I live in a dry place. The trees that grow easily here are willow (by water), poplars, hawthorn, pinus spp, elder, plus some natives. There are also stone fruit that do well - apricots, peaches, plums, cherries, grape vines. But really you need to look at what you have locally.

    If you search for 'portugal' you'll find some other threads - maybe you could contact the other Portugese members and see if they know?
     
  9. our eden

    our eden Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2008
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Portugal
    Home Page:
    Climate:
    Warm Mediterranean
    Thank you all

    that certainly gives me some directions to pursue. thanks for all the advice :clap:
     

Share This Page

-->