tree ideas for a 12 acres forest/Arboretum?

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Nickolas, Nov 25, 2012.

  1. Nickolas

    Nickolas Junior Member

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    thanks andrew, i haven't had an xmas presant in years but this will be one xmas presant i will be glad to receive.

    I have 102 red Oak acorns in pots, 10 english Oak seedlings in pots and 73 persian Oak acorns in pots, what should i do with them when they are all up? give them away to my friends and neighbours? i am going to use a ground auger to dig the holes(120cm x 30cm), i will be makeing up soil to use in the holes and i will be using a length of aggie pipe in each hole for watering.
     
  2. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    is the persian oak Quercus Macrocantherus?
    Where did you get them?
    can u get me some?
    rip lines on contour are also a good preperation method
     
  3. Nickolas

    Nickolas Junior Member

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    The Persian Oak is Quercus macranthera also called Caucasian oak.
    I still have some of the acorns left over, i got them from the north entrance to Victoria park in Ballarat last May.


    Persian Oak info:
    A tree up to 30 m tall occurring in the highlands of the Caucasus and Northern Iran at altitudes of up to 2,500 m. Young specimens have a silvery bark that turns dark grey with advancing age. Branches mostly begin low down. The bark becomes rough and takes on deep grooves; young twigs are covered in thick woolly hair. The leathery obovate leaves are 12 - 22 cm long and 5 - 14 cm wide. They are regularly lobed with 8 - 10 pairs of shallow blunt lobes. They are rough and dark green on the upper side; the underside is grey and felt-like. The acorns are grouped from 1 to 4, are approx. 2.5 cm in size and are half to two-thirds enclosed in the cupule. The cupule is covered with narrow contiguous scales. Q. macranthera is resistant to mildew.



     
  4. Nickolas

    Nickolas Junior Member

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    8 of the 12 acres is thickly covered in both dead and alive Acacias, which is grate because they fix nitrogen into the soil and provide shade in summer.
     
  5. Nickolas

    Nickolas Junior Member

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    Andrew a friend of mine has a mature Loquat tree, it has got lots of fruit developing on it this year, when it fruits would you like me to get you some seeds as well? i am a big fan of Loquat fruit.
     
  6. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    yes please i think it has heaps of potential
     
  7. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    put em in in early winter or put in now and keep moist
    oaks have a 4to 1 root to top ratio
     
  8. Nickolas

    Nickolas Junior Member

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    Thanks i will put them in as soon as their holes are ready.

    Quercus macranthera (Persian Oak) is the Largest and most majestic of all the Oaks, at least that’s what i read somewhere, i don’t know how accurate that is but i can say that the two Persian oaks that are in Ballarat's Victoria park are the biggest Oaks i have ever seen! If you’re ever down this way drop into the park at Ballarat and have a look, i would be surprised if you were not impressed by the two Persian Oaks there.
     
  9. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Be aware with loquats, from memory, they aren't true-to-type. They germinate readily so you are better sowing them, and then grafting from the tree that fruits the heaviest.
     
  10. matto

    matto Junior Member

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    Oaks have been known to be dependant on good soil ecology in the establishment years. If you asre close to those trees in Ballarat, grab some leaf litter from underneath them and use it to mulch around your own trees.
     
  11. Nickolas

    Nickolas Junior Member

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    thanks about the info on the loquats and oaks guys! i soil that i make and use for the trees has a lot of autumn leaves in it if that helps matto?

    here is a link to a Gardening Australia video on Bill Funk at his farm in dunkeld, the video is called a world of trees:https://www.abc.net.au/gardening/video/video_index_August2007.htm
     
  12. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    chinese elm.chinese pistashe (just saw it referred to as texas supershade tree)
     

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