To buy or not to buy...

Discussion in 'Put Your Questions to the Experts!' started by Anneke, Apr 22, 2015.

  1. Anneke

    Anneke New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2015
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi,
    My partner and I have been searching for some land for some time now. As we're on a budget, we kind of have to make do with pretty poor options, which is okay since everything is fixable. We've come across this property which is very big (1400 acres) but has very many downsides: low rainfall, very eroded land, salty groundwater but the most difficult one is the fact that there are feral rabbits and goats, who eat all the fresh vegetation before it has a chance to establish itself. We're fairly new to permaculture and aren't brought up as farmers, but we would like to contribute our bit. Has this place gone past the point of no return or are there ways to bring this one back to its natural state and if so, how? I know how to deal with the water problems and the eroded land, but don't know how to fix the rabbit and goat problems on such a large scale.
    greets!
     
  2. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2013
    Messages:
    1,780
    Likes Received:
    142
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    gardening, reading, etc
    Location:
    near St. Charles, MI, USoA
    Home Page:
    Climate:
    -15C-35C, 10cm rain/mo, clay, full sun, K-G Dfa=x=Dfb
    not really enough information, but i'd likely pass...
     
  3. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2010
    Messages:
    1,016
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    38
  4. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2014
    Messages:
    607
    Likes Received:
    83
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Arkansas Senior Appraiser
    Location:
    Vilonia, Arkansas, deep in the woods
    Climate:
    USDA zone 7b,8a.
    The feral goats can be put to use as Grasshopper mentioned. The rabbits can be trapped and turned into food or fertilizer. From that point you can remediate the land with out all the animal competition since the animals will then be contributory instead of antagonistic.
     
  5. Nick Ritar

    Nick Ritar Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2007
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    There is probably nothing wrong with the land, that a good plan and good management can't fix, but don't underestimate how much work and capital would be required to turn a place that size around.

    Having farmed that kind of land before I can say that unless you have a clear business plan to manage a large acreage it will quickly become a burden.

    Many people get the permaculture bug and bite off more than they can chew. I believe that once you get over 5 acres you need to spend considerable amount of time setting up the property and then have a very good management plan in place.

    My advice - if you don't intend to farm it - or reforest it - buy something much much smaller.
     
  6. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2014
    Messages:
    607
    Likes Received:
    83
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Arkansas Senior Appraiser
    Location:
    Vilonia, Arkansas, deep in the woods
    Climate:
    USDA zone 7b,8a.
    Sage advice there Nick. My own approach is to remediate small chunks at a time which makes it not so overwhelming and you can see progress which will keep a person going at it instead of getting overwhelmed and possibly giving up.

    I've also found that some folks initially create a good plan, then for some reason the alter that good plan into something not as good, this too can create frustration.
     

Share This Page

-->