The Sunday Report

Discussion in 'General chat' started by ~Tullymoor~, Nov 6, 2005.

  1. christopher

    christopher Junior Member

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    Actuall, Tullymoor (QotF, Hot, PoPP, AoC (D) :love7: ), all I did was mention what I did today, which, among other things (well, not too much other things) included some theft of intellectual property. Other than my guilt in stealing, I have to plead innocent of all other charges, especially turning this thread to, um, smelly sandwich fillings. Oooh, I hate to point this out, but..... the real culprit would be, (gulp), >FRANCEYNE
     
  2. earthbound

    earthbound Junior Member

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    I don't imagine that you go to work each day without expecting to be paid for it Richard so why should a musician.....?

    Those people that destroy huge piles of CD's are generally the big corporations, not the little guys who are just trying to make a living.....

    If people are expected to give their work away for nothing how are they meant to survive... I'm not sure I understand exactly where your coming from when you say that
    OK, no you don't need to charge for it but how are you meant to pay for a roof over your head and feed and cloth yourself. You'd have to give up the music and go and do paid work to support yourself, and then you don't have the time to make music.

    Fair enough it would be great if you can trade your music for food, clothes etc, or use a LETS scheme... But to say that intelectual and artistic property should be given away seems a bit purist, and unrealistic in todays commercial world... Why should music be any different to someone who produces food, or clothing, or a builder, is it any less valuable.?
     
  3. Tezza

    Tezza Junior Member

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    Go Ricky Go Ricky Go Ricky.....I agre with Ricky,but i also agree with the other sides (Franceyne)...and also to a degree with my fishmate joel..

    I see the perfect world idea of both sides,

    the world thats not dominated by finacial affairs is the world i want....

    Its not what we should ask our world....Its what we can do for Our World
    (borrowed from JFK altered by TJH


    Tezza
     
  4. heuristics

    heuristics Junior Member

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    sunday report

    Douglas Barnes and Scotty Meister, Forget the Sunday report boys, what's the goss on your Saturday night?

    Scott A. Meister wrote:
    It (tinnitus) usually occures more after I've had a night of beer-drinking with the boys...


    DEJBarnes wrote: He He! You just wait until next Saturday...

    BTW, are we going to Beardo's?
     
  5. Douglas J.E. Barnes

    Douglas J.E. Barnes Junior Member

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    Re: sunday report

    A sayonara party for a friend who is leaving Japan for good.
     
  6. murray

    murray Junior Member

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    hi franceyne

    >It is a shame that people don't even think about electronic theft as stealing.
    >We have friends that have offered to burn us cd's of music that we like,
    >music that they have got from the internet - these same people get a little
    >toey when we refuse the cd and tell them that we will buy the cd and
    >support the band - these people also wonder why bands don't tour Australia
    >- they don't have record sales to justify a tour because people are stealing
    >the music instead of buying it - 'tis all very silly.

    this debate is rather personal to me as i write and perform music and i believe that downloading is an issue every artist needs to think through for themselves.

    for my part, it's not necessarily evil.

    i can see how some people view downloading of music (or any kind of content) as stealing.. but as an artist myself... if it's a choice between my music getting heard and not getting heard, i'll go for getting heard every single time...

    even if it means i don't get paid for my content.

    i know plenty of authors who have made their books available free online, and have in turn generated so many more readers for their printed versions than they would have by relying on a big publishing company. (don't we all prefer the real thing over reading on a screen? i know i do.. and buy my favorite books so i can actually read them and carry them with me)..

    i have tried to convince other authors to put their stuff online for free.. and they say, 'but i'm afraid people will photocopy them and hand them out on street corners.'

    i tell them that it seems to have worked out well for Jesus... :)

    i tell them, as an artist, the more people listening to or reading what i create, the better.

    i have recently put together a CD with a friend who owns a restaurant. we had literally dozens of tracks we wanted to put on the album, but sadly, could only afford to license 11. what about the other 60-80 tracks unavailable in australia that nobody will ever hear?

    we BEGGED the record companies involved to allow us to offer legal downloads of all these wonderful tracks. we reasoned that we could direct buyers of our CD and visitors to our website a choice of all that extra music that they could browse & purchase.

    none of them would even consider it and you know what? i'm betting that most of the artists involved would have loved to have their music on our legal downloads page.

    and the irony: most of the music we ended up putting on our album we had to download illegally to begin with, since none of it was available in australia.

    so - i guess what i'm saying is:

    1. the world isn't black and white with regard to this issue

    2. not all downloading is stealing

    3. not all stealing is bad for the artist

    4. the current system is severely broken and until major labels offer easy legal music downloads, people will keep doing it illegally.

    5. i encourage people to bypass labels, download music legally if they can, illegally if they can't, but always try to find a way to support the artist if possible.

    peace 8)
     
  7. Tezza

    Tezza Junior Member

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    Hmmmmm A sort of permaculture Rogers ana Muzzastein...

    Lennon/Muzza.........A Tv show the Muzza,s


    What style you write Muzza,maybe you could write the Permie Bands First Song........."Im a Typing For a Bulliten Board"

    Or get together with corncob and Write "Sgt Muzzas Lonly permaculturists band" 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8)

    Tezza
     
  8. heuristics

    heuristics Junior Member

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    Sunday Report

    A timely piece of breaking news, relevant to numerous posts here:

    From the Ninensm home page:

    In pursuit of Kazaa

    Sunday, November 6, 2005
    "It tells the legitimate industry it's time to get into the space and robustly take up the market space from the illegal operations, and it tells the illegal operations that the rort's over."


    The global music industry's pursuit of the file-sharing company Kazaa could have come straight from a novel, with undercover operatives and surveillance videos gathering key evidence. The investigation led to a landmark Federal Court decision in Australia which effectively banned Internet music piracy. National Nine News reporter Daniel Street pursued the story here and in the UK.

    MICHAEL SPECK, copyright investigator: This was about making the online space a safe and secure place for consumers, and a safe and secure place for legitimate businesses, who were looking towards the internet, as a place where they could sell music, to consumers.

    DANIEL STREET: As Investigator Michael Speck, and a high powered team of specialist lawyers prepared to go Sydney's Federal Court, they knew there was a lot at stake. It was the end of a two year global investigation and literally billions of dollars rested on the upcoming decision.
    SPECK: I felt confident that if the court gave it due regard that Kazaa would be found to be no more than a business that ran on copyright infringement, ran on the work of other people. It would be exposed not as a revolution, just as a rort.

    STREET: Justice Murray Wilcox didn't call Kazaa a rort, in his judgment, but he did find a Sydney-based company, Sharman Networks, and five other respondents behind Kazaa, had traded songs illegally under the Australian Copyright Act.

    Justice MURRAY WILCOX: "…stated that Kazaa wa used for 79 per cent of worldwide, peer to peer file sharing activities…"

    SPECK: The Kazaa people were profiting from 270-million plus downloads each month of somebody else's work, that they never asked for, never paid for, the money just poured into their pockets and disappeared through tax havens like Vanuatu.

    STREET: Paul Buchanan is owner of Soundbuzz, one of 320 legitimate online providers selling music on the World Wide Web. So Paul, if I want to download a song from Online, how do I go about it?

    PAUL BUCHANAN, Soundbuzz: It's a very straight forward process, you first have to log in and then it's a matter of making a choice really of what song you like.

    STREET: What about Pete Murray?

    BUCHANAN: Ok, there's Stones there, Missy Higgens, but we can go for Pete Murray, have a listen to the song, make sure that's the one you want, and make a choice, which is simply a matter of clicking on the buy button, that then goes into your shopping cart and away you go to the checkout, put down your credit card, and you start to download the song.

    STREET: But Kazaa was offering songs for free.

    BUCHANAN: Yes, and the artists weren't getting paid for those songs, for those acquisitions of songs.

    STREET: The difference between many legitimate operators and Kazaa is that Kazaa is a peer to peer file sharing network. Everyone who downloads Kazaa makes their personal music libraries on their home computer available to anyone else. So, if you want a song, you just have to key in the words and the software will locate someone with it and download it to your computer.

    STREET: How did Kazaa make its money if they're saying that the music's freely available?

    SPECK: They made their money from advertising, and spyware…

    STREET: What's spyware?

    SPECK: Spyware is the capacity to identify the activity of the computer. It's another way of gleaning internet market intelligence, quite a valuable product when you consider that these people had some 320-million plus subscribers at any given time. We know that they used in the vicinity of three-billion dollars worth of somebody else's music to run their business that they didn't pay for.

    STREET: It was, according the the industry, simply music theft on an inconceivable scale... and the industry had to stop it. The way to do it was to take it to the courts, but which court and and in which country? Kazaa had a quicksilver corporate structure, spanning many countries and involving many companies. The music industry gave Michael Speck and a team of lawyers a huge budget to track Kazaa down… with a brief, basically to find a place to sue in.

    SPECK: We started quite simply by trying to pull apart the strands of the corporate structure. We found something like 120 companies in the structure, around the world. We had investigators travel to most of the places where Kazaa companies could be identified.

    STREET: Such as?

    SPECK: Northern Europe, Vanuatu in particular, the United States, the United Kingdom. For it to effectively prosecuted, the structure had to be reversed engineered effectively. The corporate structure was a complex one designed to avoid anyone ever discovering who was behind it.

    STREET: Kazaa was co-founded by Nicholas Zennstrom, who recently sold the Skpe internet phone business to E-bay for a staggering 2.6 billion dollars. But Zenstrom and his business partner sold Kazaa back in 2002, when the music industry in the United States was trying to shut it down, as it did with the online music business, Napster. So, Michael Speck and his team of investigators searched the globe for clues to Kazaa's corporate structure, incredibly their search ended up, in Cremorne, on Sydney's lower North Shore… this is Kazza's world headquarters. Zennstrom had sold the business to Sharman Networks, and linked to that company were two Sydney high-flyers, Nicki Hemming and Kevin Burmeister. Hemming had come from Britain in the 90s to sell software for Richard Branson's Virgin Interactive computer games. Burmeister had himself made a fortune out of computer games. Little did they know it, but they were under constant surveillance by the music industry's investigators.

    STREET: Why did you need to film them playing golf and putting out garbage, walking down the street?

    SPECK: We were looking for some point that would tell us who was running Kazaa, where the money was going, because people must have made hundreds of millions of dollars. It's all gone. The music industry demonstrated how serious it is today, in trying to crack down on music piracy over the internet…"

    STREET: These raids, authorised by the Federal Court, provided vital information to begin the landmark prosecution against Kazaa.

    SPECK: There can be no doubt that the Kazaa people were leap-frogging territories, avoiding prosecution and thought they'd be safe in Australia. This was a test of the Australian judicial system's capacity to deal with new technology, I am proud to say the court was up to it, it was up to the technology, it was up to a complex and complicated scam, it was up to the concerted offence of that scam and it brought down a well considered judgement which I think will ring loud in the ears of pirates around the world.

    STREET: While the judge did not shut down Kazaa, he gave it until the end of November to put in filters to stop the downloading of pirated music. But the most important thing he did was allow the music industry to claim damages - and that could indeed be the killer blow to the music pirates.

    JOHN KENNEDY, International Federation of the Phonographic Industry: It's been a long road, it's been an expensive road, not only our rights have been infringed but the rights of artists and songwriters have been infringed, and there has to be compensation for that.

    STREET: When you say expensive, how expensive?

    KENNEDY: Millions of dollars. No piece of litigation is cheap.

    STREET: Could you put a figure on what this has cost the music industry, Kazaa?

    KENNEDY: Many millions of dollars, but at the end of the day, it's been worth every cent.

    STREET: Watching the judgement closely from London was John Kennedy the boss IFPI, the record industry's global peak body.

    KENNEDY: Well this was the first time a case such as this had gone to full trial. There'd been Napster hearings in the USA, there had been the Grokster hearings in the USA where it was sent back to the courts below to reconsider the matter. This was a full blown trial with evidence from both sides, and this was a fully considered hearing with a considered and sensible judgement.

    SPECK: This judgement is a template, or a road map for both the legitimate and illegitimate industry. It tells the legitimate industry it's time to get into the space and robustly take up the market space from the illegal operations, and it tells the illegal operations that the rort's over.
     
  9. Tezza

    Tezza Junior Member

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    Sounds to me that Someone, somewhere dont like loosing money,
    eg The government tax collectors,..Funny how some people get so agitated over money aint it........Pity the financial resorses dont go to the poor,
    instead of the gready parasites who make sure they get their money.....

    Lets get back to the old ways,

    As Pink Floyd sing "money, who gives a dam"

    yet its becomming a theme song for a making money segment in the media..

    These financial parasites probly dont know the difference from a semi colon to a bodily colon or a crotchett from a rachett....

    Everything should be free, Again...".Free as a Bird"

    Tezza
     
  10. murray

    murray Junior Member

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    if you'd like to hear a song i wrote together with a friend (who's the singer), you can grab this:
    https://207.21.197.146/Okay.mp3

    (i'm on guitar in this track)
     
  11. Franceyne

    Franceyne Junior Member

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    Thank you for sharing your views and music Murray - it is a lovely track, a great maturity and very pleasant to listen to - it would be quite at home coming out of the speakers in one of the Castlemaine cafes out my way :D
     
  12. murray

    murray Junior Member

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    thanks franceyne. nice of you to say. :D
     
  13. Cornonthecob

    Cornonthecob Junior Member

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    Cool tune...reminds me of someone but can't think who? :)
     
  14. Tezza

    Tezza Junior Member

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    Nice Song Nice guitar Player.Not sure on the voices names but sure I know them somewhere

    Who are they anyone famous?

    Tezza
     
  15. murray

    murray Junior Member

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    nobody famous. we're just 3 idiots recording songs for fun.
     
  16. Tezza

    Tezza Junior Member

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    Did i load the wrong song down muzza or do u wear tight jeans

    Tezza
     
  17. baldcat

    baldcat Junior Member

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    Ok so I'm sure 3 chooks can fix this....
     
  18. baldcat

    baldcat Junior Member

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    Well I can't let Muzza just post his stuff willy nilly so here are acouple of beta of my own..
    Me on guitar and vocals, Pete Williamson Lead and co writer (Nephew you to John) and guitarist for Pete Murray..

    https://www.worldpartypro.com/downloads/FarorNear.mp3
    https://www.worldpartypro.com/downloads/Lisa.mp3
    https://www.worldpartypro.com/downloads/SweetTalking.mp3
    https://www.worldpartypro.com/downloads/02Falling.mp3
    https://www.worldpartypro.com/downloads/01Falling.mp3 (professional recording proformed by Venus Eclipse (now defuct)

    *** WARNING - Levels to vary and there are bum notes.. Listen at your own risk :) :rock:

    PS Sorry Fran no thrashing METAL :thefinger: :headbang: Pete is a bit of a softie :hippy2:
     
  19. Tezza

    Tezza Junior Member

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    Hey man this stuff is good i love the first still going thru the list

    Tezza
     
  20. Tamandco

    Tamandco Junior Member

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    I've just read trough this thread, so am a bit behind the discussion.

    Murray, love the album 'Spirit House', that your cafe friend is releasing soon. Would certainly add that one to my collection. In fact, I'd love to give it to one of my best friends for her birthday as I know she'd love it.

    The song with you on guitar reminds me a bit of Frente! (I used to work with Simon's brother, Matthew)

    Tam
     

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