The plan - from hobby to experience to major long-term career change.

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself Here' started by Poise, Aug 16, 2010.

  1. Poise

    Poise Junior Member

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    Hi there, I have recently moved to Wagga, NSW and I am currently investigating a PDC to attend. I have just purchased an urban block of land (1400sqm) in the flood plain of the Murrumbidgee River. In the short-term, I would like to use this piece of land to implement what I learn in the course, in the hope that I can be self-sufficient. In the longer-term, I would then like to use my experience and knowledge to encourage the establishment of few eco-community gardens. My land is situated in North Wagga, and it is surrounded by acres and acres of empty plots of land which cannot be developed due to the zoning, and so would be perfect for eco-community gardens. As it happens, there are a few Charles Sturt Uni students just up the road studying environmental science, and I am sure they could be involved in some way. I am also seriously considering completing a Bachelor of Environmental Science to compliment the permaculture side of things, with a vew to eventually securing some work in this field.

    I would really love to hear any thoughts or suggestions you might have about what direction I should take. It might be appropriate to tell you that I have absolutely no experience at permaculture, or even horticulture. Up until very recently, I have never had my own garden!! Sad, but true. I dreamt of returning to the country for 10 years, and have finally done it. And I have to say, I can feel a new path looming, and it is feeling damn good. And when I get really experienced (I can't help planning way way ahead), I would then love to see if I could add some value to an overseas aid-work project.
     
  2. hawkypork

    hawkypork Junior Member

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    Hi poise,

    You should be able to keep yourself busy on 1400m. On river flats with a climate that will let you grow the full suite of temperate foods. I am not sure about being self sufficient but you will be a lot more in control than you were before started gardening. A few years ago I moved to a rural cottage on about 1200m in Boddington, south of Perth (hot summers, frosty winters) and kept myself very entertained in the garden. From my experience our few chooks made the biggest and easiest gains at start-up (safe eggs, manure, humour). It also helps to have an idea about how you plan to best utilise the cyclical gluts that you will enjoy.

    I have an environmental science degree. It has given me a career but it hasnt led me to my rural idyll just yet. If you do, stay away from environmental management subjects, you can pick that up on your way, and instead focus on useful stuff like soil science and botany.

    I can feel your enthusiasm coming off the computer screen. Good for you. Go for it!

    PS Last night we had a roast for 7 and all of the vegetables (potatoes, beetroots, turnips, kale, peas and baby carrots) came out of a 9 month old vege patch that has already given summer crops. It wont take long to get a decent feed.
     
  3. Grahame

    Grahame Senior Member

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    Hi Poise, Welcome to the forums.

    Permaculture is a funny thing. The way I see it, or have experienced it, has been a long journey from when I first discovered it. In the early days I thought it was mostly about companion planting and organic gardening. I happily went along thinking that for a while. Then I read a little bit more and started to realise that it was much more than organic gardening. I soon realised that even some organic gardening could really not be considered as being within the context of permaculture. As time went by I came to realise (through David Holmgren's work mostly) that it is so much more than gardening, that it is about the way we do most things in our lives, buildings, transport, energy, food, water, etc. More recently I am of the opinion that Permaculture is much more about a state of being that is supported by a series of Ethics and Principles that allow us to manage our lives through well designed systems.

    To this end I think permaculture is an organic (pun intended) thing that we each must find our place with in and also find within our place.

    My personal opinion is that science degrees are intrinsically worthless, but I also believe that the process of living may involve science degrees and if that is your path then so be it. But, I don't know that it will necessarily guide you closer to permaculture or to it more quickly than another course in life. What I do know is that if you spend time in nature, with soil, with animals and with the land then you will necessarily be drawn closer to permaculture.

    That's how I feel at least.
     
  4. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    You might like to check out Purple Pear for your PDC. https://www.purplepear.net.au/ Mark is a regular here so you'd get post - PDC support for free!
     
  5. ecodharmamark

    ecodharmamark Junior Member

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    G'day Poise

    Welcome to the PRI Forum.

    It's always good to have a plan.

    Grahame's wise words, "...[a]s time went by I came to realise (through David Holmgren's work mostly) that it is so much more than gardening, that it is about the way we do most things in our lives, buildings, transport, energy, food, water, etc." ring true. Permaculture IS more than just 'organic gardening'. It is a platform for planning how to live one's life in the most holistic and sustainable (in every sense of the word) manner possible.

    The following gives a good introduction to the concept:

    The Holistic Life: Sustainability through Permaculture

    The latter is compulsory reading for any who wish to explore the infinite intricacies of the concept:

    Permaculture: Principles and Pathways Beyond Sustainability

    Good luck on your journey, Markos.
     
  6. Poise

    Poise Junior Member

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    Thanks so much for your advice. It is so helpful. I cannot wait to sit down with family and friends to enjoy a yummy dinner with vegetables and herbs from my own garden. No-one will believe it actually, because a domestic goddess I aint!! This is about to change!! The chooks will definitely feature in the garden.

    The only course offered here at CSU is the one which excludes the management subjects, so that is lucky. I will definitely concentrate on the soils and botany etc, I can see that this will complimenet any permaculture stuff I do. I guess when I am thinking Degree, I am thinking about overseas work on aid projects. It just might give me a bit of kudos. I will have to match this with practical experiencem, naturally.

    Enjoy your garden.
     
  7. Poise

    Poise Junior Member

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    Thanks so much Markos for the references. I really appreciate it, and will really enjoy reading these.
     
  8. Poise

    Poise Junior Member

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    Took a look, thanks eco4560, very interesting site, bookmarked it and will read it in more detail after work.
     
  9. Poise

    Poise Junior Member

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    Hi Grahame

    Thanks for taking the time to write. The state of being. Yes, that is how I see it. I wish for permaculture to be my entry point into the world of sustainability, and for this to be my general state of being. I do appreciate your thoughts about the degree, and I tend to agree. I guess I am thinking waaaay ahead and hoping to compliment any practical experience I gain by getting down in the dirt and learning from books and experienced people such as yourself, and when my kids fly the coop, I can get overseas (with a little kudos in-hand) to help other communities develop sustainable practices.
    Fiona.
     
  10. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

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    Welcome to PRI and permaculture. When it comes to designing your place, I also find useful other ideas such as forest gardens and xericulture. I hadn't done any vegetable gardening when i started here but i had already planted a forest. But i find with every project there is a ton to learn. Just get in and learn as you go, do a course if you can afford it. Learning from every quarter will pay off the biggest rewards i think. Having a place to start working with plants is the most valuable thing you've got at the moment because you some where to put into practice and trial what you are learning in theory.
     
  11. Poise

    Poise Junior Member

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    Thank you sun burn for your comments, I really appreciate them. I love the sound of forest gardens, I hadn't thought about this before. And I think education will certainly help. I will also be relying on books and formums such as the PRI forum. So thank you for your interest. The learning curve is going to be extremely steep for a while, and yes, having a garden is a godsend because I can get out there and try things and perhaps experiment. Catch up another time.
     
  12. vegetablevn

    vegetablevn New Member

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    Hi,

    Thanks very much for this comment. It help me to think about my ideals.


    Tks again and pls keep posting
     
  13. meher

    meher Junior Member

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    actually permaculture is an approach to designing human settlements and agricultural systems that mimic the relationships found in natural ecologies.
     

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