"The next generation of scenarios for climate change research and assessment"

Discussion in 'News from around the damp planet' started by ecodharmamark, Mar 19, 2010.

  1. ecodharmamark

    ecodharmamark Junior Member

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    G'day All

    It appears that we are once again moving forward in the world of climate science. This is very exciting stuff:

    The next generation of scenarios for climate change research and assessment

    Abstract:

    Advances in the science and observation of climate change are providing a clearer understanding of the inherent variability of Earth’s climate system and its likely response to human and natural influences. The implications of climate change for the environment and society will depend not only on the response of the Earth system to changes in radiative forcings, but also on how humankind responds through changes in technology, economies, lifestyle and policy. Extensive uncertainties exist in future forcings of and responses to climate change, necessitating the use of scenarios of the future to explore the potential consequences of different response options. To date, such scenarios have not adequately examined crucial possibilities, such as climate change mitigation and adaptation, and have relied on research processes that slowed the exchange of information among physical, biological and social scientists. Here we describe a new process for creating plausible scenarios to investigate some of the most challenging and important questions about climate change confronting the global community...

    Source: Moss et al (2010) The next generation of scenarios for climate change research and assessment. Nature 463, 747-756 (11 February 2010)

    Full article available here (for a fee): Nature

    or

    Message/email me for 'other arrangements' ;)

    Cheerio, and happy reading, Marko.
     
  2. ...important questions like -

    - why aint IPCC head Parchauri in jail ?

    - Why has the Australian Government not done a full Audit of the discredited IPCC/ Garnault claims ?

    - Why do some so-called climate scientists need to corrupt data to support their claims... Hocky stick graphs, etc..

    - and a whole serious of questions which can be found here -
    https://wattsupwiththat.com/







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  3. mos6507

    mos6507 Junior Member

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    You forgot the biggest mystery of all!

    Why are climate deniers on a permaculture forum?
     
  4. mos6507 , whats a "climate denier"..... :confused:





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  5. ecodharmamark

    ecodharmamark Junior Member

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    G'day All

    Now that you have had a chance to read about the 'next generation of scenarios for climate change research and assessment', perhaps it is time to turn your attention to those brave young scholars who work tirelessly here in Australia to ensure that you and I can be kept up to date with facts as they relate to climate change (both naturally-occurring, and human-induced). These brilliant young academics are not some faceless beings, hiding in the upper floors of university campuses and slavishly manipulating data in order to create some grand conspiracy. They are good, honest, hard working people, dedicated to the science of testing and recording observable data and working towards supporting programs that endeavour to halt human-made ecological destruction. They don't do it for fame, or fortune, they do it because they believe that present society has no right to diminish the future livability of that which is yet to come...

    Starting with (and chosen for no particular reason) the University of New South Wales (UNSW), they are:

    Francia Avila - PhD Student: Francia is currently studying the impact of CO2 concentrations and land-use change on the global monsoon systems. She is also interested in tropical cyclones, extreme weather and disaster risk reduction.

    Michael Bates - PhD Student: Michael is interested in global scale numerical modelling of the worlds oceans.

    Kat Bormann - PhD Student: Kat is interested in the impacts of climate change on catchment hydrology and water resources in the snow-affected catchments within the Murray-Darling Basin. Her research will involve using regional climate and rainfall-runoff modelling tools that are spatially informed by satellite data to assess the range of potential impacts on catchment hydrology associated with future climate change.

    Tim Cowan - PhD Student: Tim is currently studying the large-scale impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on atmospheric-oceanic circulation. He is also interested in understanding how both anthropogenic and volcanic aerosols modulate oceanic heat content, and impact the Asia monsoon.

    Maxwell S. Gonzalez - PhD Student: Maxwell is interested in stability of the Southern Ocean thermohaline circulation. The Oceans, in particular the Southern Ocean, play an important role on much of the Earths climate system.The aim of my PhD Thesis is to assess the variability and predictability of the Southern Ocean-Atmospheric-ice system over the last 100 years and into the next 100 years, with a main focus (but not exclusive) to the ways in which the ocean may respond to the changing climate and its effect on the Australian/Southern Hemispheres climate.

    Khalia Hill - PhD Student: Khalia is interested in Southern Hemisphere rainfall variability linked to large-scale climate modes. There is a particular focus on shifting rainfall patterns over eastern Australia and an emphasis on extreme climate conditions - i.e. drought - linked to multi-decadal variability and/or climate change.

    Karin Kvale - PhD Student: Karin is interested in how biogeochemical feedbacks in the ocean contribute to general system stability. She is currently investigating the relationship between oxygen and the carbon cycle, and the processes associated with abrupt climate change using the UVic model.

    Ian Macadam - PhD Student: Ian is interested in projections of future regional climate conditions. His work is related to improving the scenarios of future climate used in studies of climate change impacts and adaptation options.

    Tristan Sasse - PhD Student: Tristan is interested in developing an independent measure of the global oceanic absorption of carbon dioxide, in order to better understand the oceans role in regulating atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.

    Emily Shaw - PhD Student: Emily's research will investigate seasonal and diurnal variability of carbonate parameters in southern Great Barrier Reef waters. These observations will help characterize the risk of this region to ocean acidification.

    Alejandro Silva - MSc Student: Alejandro's main research interest is large scale open ocean variability and its impact in climate and climate change. His current project will involve to assess the effects of El Niño Modoki by using data and numerical models.

    Graham Simpkins - PhD Student: Graham is currently studying ocean-ice-atmosphere interactions at the Southern Hemisphere high latitudes. This includes, most notably, how ocean and ice anomalies induced by the Southern Annular Mode (SAM), feed back to maintain the persistence of the SAM in the atmosphere.

    Jessica Trevena - PhD Student: Jessica is currently modelling southern hemisphere rapid climate change and thermohaline circulation, including:

    •Antarctic Bottom Water - response to and effect on southern hemisphere climate changes.
    •Paleoclimate - relating the southern hemisphere proxy record to current and possible future climate states.
    •Atmosphere/ Ocean/ Biological feedbacks - rapid climate change mechanisms.

    Recent PhD submissions:

    Faye Cruz: Faye's thesis is titled "Characterization of the physiological feedbacks to increase in leaf-level atmospheric carbon dioxide from global to regional scales".

    Sarah Perkins: Sarah's thesis is titled " Evaluation and 21st century projections of global climate change models at a regional scale over Australia".

    Jan Zika: Jan's thesis is titled "Quantifying ocean mixing from hydrographic data".


    Please visit their webpage and put a face to their names. You may even feel inclined to write them a letter, thanking them for their dedication to helping ensure the future survival of the biosphere.

    Cheerio, Markus.
     
  6. And the main question is - Would they have got funding if they wer'nt looking at the Al Gore approved climate questions ? ... :D




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