The joy of making stuff!

Discussion in 'Recipes & Remedies' started by mouseinthehouse, Feb 18, 2013.

  1. mouseinthehouse

    mouseinthehouse Junior Member

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    This last couple of weeks we have been having fun making some great stuff from the garden and produce from family.

    So far we have produced:

    * Picalillie pickles
    *Fig jam
    *bottled peaches
    *kale chips
    *dried figs (currently in progress)
    *pickled onions

    Soon we will have to do something creative with:

    *beans
    *eggplant
    *zucchini
    *squash
    *more figs!
    *red Aztec corn

    What's everyone been making?
     
  2. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Pesto. I keep forgetting just how good home made pesto is and how easy it is!
    I also roasted some of the coffee that I grew - I thought that it would be just tolerable and worth drinking only for the caffeine hit, but it's actually really good! (A lot of work though....)
    If you were up the road I'd offer to take some figs off you....
     
  3. mouseinthehouse

    mouseinthehouse Junior Member

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    Pesto! Of course! I have just got some basil plants going after all the torrid hot weather and beetle invasion. Will give pesto a go in another couple of weeks.

    I can only dream of growing coffee....:)
     
  4. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper Senior Member

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    you need a civet and make your own Kopi luwak
     
  5. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    I tried to get my Burmese cat on the job be he wasn't interested.
     
  6. chook-in-eire

    chook-in-eire Junior Member

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    re pesto: Here in the northern hemisphere we are getting our first tentative signs of spring. One of these signs is the emergence of wild garlic (Allium ursinum) in certain types of woodlands. I have some planted under a beech tree and once the leaves are big enough to harvest I will make wild garlic pesto again. The leaves are used instead of basil and obviously there is no need to add garlic, only olive oil, pinenuts or cashews or sunflower seeds, parmesan and some salt. It's delicious.
     
  7. mouseinthehouse

    mouseinthehouse Junior Member

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    Sounds wonderful chook-in-eire!

    Can someone in Oz recommend a brand of pinenuts? I am paranoid about pine nuts now after my partner and I suffered from 'pine nut mouth' after buying some pine nuts which came from China. It is not a pleasant experience and lasts for days. It is caused by eating a particular type of pine nut which has been harvested when immature. It leaves you with a bitter taste in your mouth that totally taints EVERYTHING you eat and drink for some time. It is not something I want to go through again in a hurry lol!
     
  8. pippimac

    pippimac Junior Member

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    Off topic, but...
    I never use pine nuts, way to expensive for me.
    I usually use sunflower seeds and cashews, either in combo, or alone.
    Of course it's missing that amazing 'resinous' flavour, but it's still really good at nth of the cost!
     
  9. mouseinthehouse

    mouseinthehouse Junior Member

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    They are expensive aren't they? I might just try some of the alternatives you mentioned. :)
     
  10. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper Senior Member

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  11. aroideana

    aroideana Junior Member

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    I have made pesto using fresh local macadamias . They have thin shells and are very easy to crack open.
    Cost ... nothing , just time and effort .
     
  12. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    I used macadamias in my last batch. They work well.

    Made a really good chicken curry last night with a lot of the ingredients from the garden. Organic chicken thighs, a tin of tomato and one of coconut cream, tamari, fish sauce, tamarind paste, palm sugar, coconut oil and a carrot were the only store bought stuff. And some of Grahame's garlic that I pickled past year. The garden contributed lemon grass, kaffir lime leaves, vietnamese mint, chillies, corn, ginger, turmeric, kang kong, beans, false cardamon leaves, male squash flowers and growing tips off the squash vine.

    It takes time to break the tradition of opening the fridge door and thinking 'there's no food'! It still amazes me how much I get out of my garden if I don't open the fridge door. Particularly when you start to think laterally and use things like the tips of the squash vine.
     
  13. mouseinthehouse

    mouseinthehouse Junior Member

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    I think macadamias here are as expensive as pine nuts!
     
  14. annette

    annette Junior Member

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    I just started salivating reading this! yum
     
  15. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    I have a couple of 100 yo stone pines and full appreciate why the kernal sells for 80$ \kg the black cockeys luv em!
    anyone have any experience in growing/germinating them??
     
  16. Speedy

    Speedy Junior Member

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    andrew,
    Stone pine , being a native of Mediterranean region and relatively warm areas, require no stratification.
    sow them into seedling flats then out into tubes or direct into tubes.
    I like to use 500ml bottomless forestry tubes.
    when about 6mths old introduce mycorrhizal spores with watering.
    not essential as something will find its way to partner upwith them, but you may as well try inoculate them with a useful species of fungi.
    I like Lactarius deliciosus
    Suillus granulatus or S.luteus is ok, but I prefer the milkcaps(Lactarius)
    Milkcaps cooked with cream and pinenuts for breakfast is yum!
    I had the first slipperyjacks (Suillus granulatus) from inoculated Pinus halepensis this year (grown from seed, inoculated and planted 4-5yrs ago)

    what have i been making?
    salami,
    prosciutti,
    sausages (mutton and pork)
    lard
    soap
    liquers,
    sauerkraut, beer
    and a bloody big mess in my shed.
    but hey, life's good :)
     
  17. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    I made cumquat marmalade recently from my own fruit. It's sooooo goooood. Definitely needs a lazy Sunday morning where you can concentrate on every mouthful, rather than eating the toast in the car while talking on the phone....
     
  18. Grahame

    Grahame Senior Member

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    We've been enjoying the medlar jelly we made a month or so ago. We used a little too much pectin in it so it is thick, but I like it like that and it is delicious. Wifey is going to make a chutney with the left over medlar flesh and some of our apples today. That should be a treat! I get such a kick out of using every last bit of something... Like making stock from the left over rooster carcass and then suing the vegies and meat from the stock to make dog food. It's awesome.
     

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