The 4 Levels of Regenerative Agriculture

Discussion in 'The big picture' started by TGIChristian, Sep 17, 2016.

  1. TGIChristian

    TGIChristian New Member

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    Hi all my permie friends,
    I wanted to let you know about the white paper that our company just released today outlining our view of the Levels of Regenerative Agriculture.

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    Please check it out here, and join the conversation:
    https://www.terra-genesis.com/regenerative-agriculture/

    Just to share with you some of the reasons that we felt it was of timely importance to write this up, is because there are significant actions being taken behind the scenes to bring about a certification for Regenerative Ag. This isn't necessarily a bad thing in and of itself, but we are seeing that there is a potential for the whole of Regenerative Agriculture to be fragmented down (flat-landed) to simply Carbon Farming.

    Building soil and sequestering Carbon are certainly key pieces that any definition of Regenerative Agriculture must include, but there is so much more to it, and way more potential to make the Regenerative Agriculture movement truly transformative rather than just another small step in the right direction.

    Please take a look at our work and let us know your thoughts.

    https://www.terra-genesis.com/regenerative-agriculture/

    Thanks so much,
    Christian Shearer
    Terra Genesis International
     
  2. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    An excellent treatise Christian. I appreciate the way everything has been broken down and explained. I have noticed that as the paper points out, many are focusing on carbon sequestering and that it should be simply a portion of what should be achieved.

    On Buzzard's Roost Farm, we have many goals to achieve. One of which is the production of most of our food supply. A second goal is to put in fruit trees and garden areas that occupy the spaces between the Orchard trees. This allows us to sequester carbon better, build the soil microbiology better, introduce more humus and support all the microorganisms now thriving from our regenerative efforts. As we continue along, filling in spaces that were previously laid bare for grass, we include many different plants, each with multiple purposes. Pastures have around 20 different plants so that soil is built by the natural processes the plants go through each season. We raise hogs and they also contribute to this soil building as they go about the things hogs do. One of our biggest goals is to not have any huge chunks of land that looks different from the old growth forest that occupies most of the farm. Our approach is that we utilize the man made things that were previously introduced to our land and to not create any more of these things unless it is the only way to have items we need. Even our buildings are constructed so as to not have sub-structure that could contaminate. We do not introduce things like concrete to areas where there isn't any now. We do not clear cut spaces for pasture, instead we remove underbrush and leave the trees where they are growing, when we remove underbrush we plant our 20+ variety pasture mix and make sure the soil is fully covered. Our plan is not so much "development" as it is "utilization" of what is already there. If we succeed in our goals, no one should come to Buzzard's Roost and think they are on a farm as much as thinking they are out in a forest.

    I have saved a copy of the paper and will be sharing it with some of our friends who are following a similar path as we are. I think it will be of as much help to them as it will be to us.
     

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