Testing quality of sprayed/artificially fertilized land

Discussion in 'Put Your Questions to the Experts!' started by Peter Gustafsson, May 28, 2016.

  1. Peter Gustafsson

    Peter Gustafsson New Member

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    Hello!
    I'm considering to buy 49 hectars of land, 29 hectars of tree plantation and 20 hectars of pasture/grazing land, in the middle of Sweden.
    The farmer who uses this land now have used artificial fertilizer and roundup at least once, last autumn. Maybe even earlier, I don't know.
    Is there a good, easy way for me to test the soil quality of this land to see if it is worth buying? I mean, if it has been sprayed for 40 years I don't know if I want it. Can I ever get a healthy crop from there? I can not ask the farmer about this, since I don't trust him. He could probably lie about it.
    Thanks in advance!
    Regards
    Peter
    Ă–stersund, Sweden
     
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  2. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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    This is an interesting question! There is so much information (and dis-information) out there regarding glyphosate that it's hard to tell whether it breaks down, binds with the soil, is taken up by plants, etc.
    Without spending $$$ for a detailed soil test in a lab, there is a kit you can purchase to evaluate glyphosate levels in the soil (also in water and other substances). https://www.abraxiskits.com/products/pesticides/ (scroll down to glyphosate).
     
  3. songbird

    songbird Senior Member

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    or you could look at it as a rescue operation.
    :)
    getting land out of the poison regimen and into more natural methods once again.

    good luck. i hope it turns out well. :)
     
  4. Peter Gustafsson

    Peter Gustafsson New Member

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    Thanks for the tip, 9anda1f, I will look into those tests a bit further. :)

    Songbird, I have thought along those lines as well. But at the same time, do I want to eat the meat from the animals grazing there? Or use their manure on my crops? Is it safe to grow vegetables there? How much nutrition will be in them? Sure, I don't always buy organic, but I want the highest quality in the food I grow and raise. I really like the idea to make that land better, but I'm also concerned about the end product that I will eat and sell... But I thank you for your input! :)

    All other suggestions is highly appreciated.
     
  5. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    , hau, Peter, If you already have an orchard, that would be a fairly safe place to start some gardens where you probably would not have to worry a lot about glyphosate contamination. Glyphosate is not active once it touches soil, this does not mean it goes inert, it means it won't kill plants anymore. To remediate land that has had "roundup" treatments you want to use Myco-remediation, You can do this by gathering the mushrooms that are growing on rotting trees and then spreading a slurry made from these mushrooms (just whirr them up with water and pour on the land) If you can purchase some of the specialized spores all the better, they will really speed up this process. Either way, you can at least get some safe food growing. For the animals, since Glyphosate goes inert (it is not taken in by roots, only through leaves) you should not have to worry about animals being contaminated. If you want to get rid of residuals first, it might take a year to two years, of intensive Myco-remediation going on before there would be minor traces left. Glyphosate has a half life of around 15 years, meaning it will be there a long time, leaching into the ground water, unless someone does the mycorrhizal remediation work. Paul Stamens has a great product for this purpose called Mycogrow https://www.fungi.com/shop/fungi-for-healthy-gardens.html there are a few other companies that have similar products on the market now.

    This company has good quality test kits https://www.abraxiskits.com/products/pesticides/
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2016
  6. Peter Gustafsson

    Peter Gustafsson New Member

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    Bryant, thanks for the great reply! :) Do you know the ratio of mushrooms:water to use? How much of this slurry do I need per hectar?
     
  7. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    Sorry I am so late in answering. I use a 10 L bucket, half full of mushroom caps then water to the top. I then pour half of that into a second bucket and I use an electric drill with a paint stirrer in the chuck to blend each half bucket. If you want to do it easier, just pour in water to cover the half bucket of mushroom caps. and stir that up.
    If you want to, you can even sharpen the leading edges of the paint stirrer so you get a finer chop going. For an even finer chop you can then take that mix and put it through a kitchen blender (or you can skip the previous and just use the kitchen blender for the whole chop ( just takes longer to get through a bunch of mushrooms).

    I've tried both ways, I continue to use the bucket because the wife didn't like me using her blender so much.
    Once you have your caps all blended the way you want them, just pour where you need it. I've done around 5 acres (about half a hectare so far) and everything grows much better, I didn't have but one area that tested for Glyphosate and after 3 applications of slurry and one and half years it tests clear now. It is why I recommend myco-remediation so much, it works.

    My research works out to around 100 Liters per hectare (I have a special nozzle on a pressure sprayer that handles large particulates) but I think one of the small, hand held home units would work if you blend to puree consistency.
     

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