Teaching Permaculture to Primary School Children

Discussion in 'Jobs, projects, courses, training, WWOOFing, volun' started by artemis, Jan 3, 2008.

  1. artemis

    artemis Junior Member

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    Hi, I have a job, one day per week, starting in Feb, teaching permaculture to chn aged 6-12. I have been practising permaculture at home for 20 years, I have a PDC and and various teaching qualifications.
    The school is in a cold climate and has a 2 year old mandala garden a la Linda Woodrow, but no chooks. Obviously, we cannot spend all day in the garden, some days it will be 40 degrees C and others it will no doubt be snowing.
    The lessons are under the heading of "science" in the school budget so I will also have to do some work under this heading.
    I have thought of a few experiements we could do with seeds. Does any one have any brilliant ideas?
    cheers and taa
     
  2. Ojo

    Ojo Junior Member

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  3. artemis

    artemis Junior Member

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    Hey thanks for that. The first site looks particularly helpful.
     
  4. Tamara

    Tamara Junior Member

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    Hi Janet,

    I'm running a workshop for kids on the 16th. I don't have any takers yet, but I do have two young people (12 and 14) helping me on the day, so even if it doesn't run, you could come and ask them questions...

    They have been coming here for about 2 years now and understand swales, compost and all sorts.

    On the workshop, I was going to teach 21 day composting, possibly compost tea, planting, mulching and watering by dripper hose...

    Linda woodrow uses worms when she couldn't use chooks... are you doing that? I reckon the kids would think that gross and lovely all at the same time.

    Also how about a forest garden? It can be build around existing trees or created under a pergola...

    If you have a seedling area ala woodrow, you will have stuff do do on very hot/cold days...

    also neighbourhood walks to take cuttings, see where local fruit grows and ask if you could pick some, especialyy if it is just left to fall.

    Ducks also? They can take extremes of weather...

    see you soon,
    Love T
     
  5. arawajo

    arawajo Junior Member

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    I have a book called "A Children's Food Forest" By Carolyn Nuttall. It's worth getting a copy if you can - published by FeFL Books, Food Forest Learnscapes In Education, PO Box 8289 Woolloongabba Qld 4102, in 1996. ISBN 0 646 29482 2.

    It is a whole teaching project linked to curriculum and includes blackline masters and a unit of work and so on. Its all based on permaculture.

    I don't want to part with my copy in case I get a chance to use it one day. It's only 72 pages long - if it's no longer available I could photocopy it for you if the author gave permission.
     
  6. artemis

    artemis Junior Member

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    Hi there, yes I will try to source a copy of the Carolyn Nuttall book, and it would be good to meet the kids too Tamara, though they are a bit older than the group I will be working with. There is a worm pit, and 2 smaller worm farms. The school is very small, less than 30 kids and last year they did not generate enough food for all those worms. (I worked there last year on a casual basis) I thought this year we might feed some additional pollard which is pretty cheap. A small school has a very limited budget. I've also considered ducks, but housing and holidays could prove problematic. We'll see.
    The glass house blew away last year, twice. I have someone making me a cold frame, but there is a tiny stable green house.
    I've also been considering converting the mandala to a perennial garden. There are so many weeds growing in it, like couch and hemlock. There are herbs like yarrow, which is pretty vicious in this climate, russian tarragon likewise, nasturtiums, sage, parsley, feverfew and many many others that the kids are having difficulty recognising and identifying plants.
    The kids favorite occupations were eating and watering.
    We have compost tea and compost as well
    cheers and thanks
    Janet
     
  7. Sonya

    Sonya Junior Member

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    Hi Janet,

    where abouts are you? Carolyn Nuttall is co-writing a new book with Janet Millington (from the Sunshine Coast) which will be out soon about teaching school children about permaculture. It will be very comprehensive.

    Permaculture Noosa have a school garden (and education) program going and so do the Chevallum State School - which is getting to a point of supplying the school tuck shop with fresh food. https://www.permaculturenoosa.com.au and we have a one day workshop in April about school gardens as part of our Future Ready Expo.

    If you're near the Sunshine Coast in Qld there is a lot happening here. I'm meeting this week to discuss how six local schools can start preparing for energy descent (climate change and peak oil) which will of course include hands on learning about food production and nutrition.

    Cheers,
    Sonya
     
  8. artemis

    artemis Junior Member

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    I'm in Victoria sadly. Just noticed they are having a launch of the book at the big bash. I've emailed Carolyn, if that email address I found is still valid, but I suspect the old book will be out of print. Still, I can wait for the new one. taa
     
  9. Ojo

    Ojo Junior Member

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    For young schoolchildren to fully appreciate the wonder of fractals, they need to be convinced that the computer is not doing something mysterious and magical, forever beyond their ken.
    https://www.mathsnet.net/articles/article_fractals.html
    https://www.coolmath4kids.com/fractals.html
    https://math.rice.edu/~lanius/frac/
    https://metalinks.metaculture.net/scienc ... ildren.asp
    https://www.artteacherconnection.com/pages/fractal.htm

    https://www.codehappy.net/pi.htm
    https://kids.dzone.com/news/monte-carlo-pi-and-gambling
    https://www.eveandersson.com/pi/monte-carlo-circle
    In a nutshell: since the universe is a series of random probabilities, performing a random action (like flipping a coin) will result in a pattern (hexagram) that reflects reality enough to provide insight.
    https://everything2.com/index.pl?node_id=39288

    if you need a good image editor, the GIMP 2 is multi-platform and has several ways to render fractals and is still free.

    https://www.gimp.org/downloads/
    or
    https://sourceforge.net/project/showfile ... _id=121075

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Ojo

    Ojo Junior Member

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  11. Ojo

    Ojo Junior Member

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  12. barely run

    barely run Junior Member

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    What about some seed sprouting during the colder times. Isabelle Shippard has a great book on sprouting....could photocopy some of the main stuff and fax it to you, if not avaiable from the libary.
    good luck with the project
    Cathy
     
  13. primal parent

    primal parent Junior Member

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    permaculture in schools

    (hello all. this is my first post here, hope it helps...)


    Here's is a list of resources I've assembled that could be of interest to anyone working with children & permaculture:

    the one thing i recommend above all other is getting both carolyn nuttal's 'food forest' and 'food forest resource sheets'. they are excellent.

    robin clayfield's 'manual for teaching permaculture creatively' has a chapter on teaching children through games and active involvement. wonderful stuff.
    https://www.earthcare.com.au/edu/

    heather coburn flores book 'food not lawns' (chelse green) has a huge chapter called 'the next generation' with tips, projects and ideas for working with kids.

    in the same vein i also recommend sharon lovejoys 'sunflower houses' and
    'roots, shoot, buckets, & boots'. though not technically "permaculture"
    there both a lot of fun.

    patty parks-wasserman is (hopefully) working on the institute of permaculture education for children

    78 el rey drive
    corrales, n.m.

    robina mccurdy ran the (now defunct) childrens permaculture foundation from 1989-1994. i believe she wrote a small article on 'pc for children' in the vol.3 #1 feb. 87 issue of permaculture activist.

    salli ramsden and tania strebl presented 'zone c: a place for children' at
    he 6th ipc.
    https://www.rosneath.com.au/ipc6/ch05/ramsden/index.html

    fiona campbell and ross grayson compiled the amazing 'permaculture goes to school" in 1997.

    dr. charlie headington wrote 'teaching permaculture in a school garden'.
    interesting montessori experiment.
    https://www.earthmatters.info/

    robin c. moore wrote 'children gardening: first steps toward a sustainable
    future' robin does a lot of work with landscape architecture and childhood
    development.

    gardening with children has some useful links
    https://www.canh.asn.au/community_garden ... denin.html

    edible schoolyard in berkely, ca https://www.edibleschoolyard.org/garden.html

    specifically for kids:

    elpels 'shanleyas quest' is sort of a 'botany in a day' for young readers.
    wonderful. available from hollowtop.com

    graham burnett drew a brilliant little zine called 'our allotment'. https://www.spiralseed.co.uk/

    april's got three stories for children on her front page at
    https://permaculturevisions.com/

    lost valley education center in oregon hosted a kids permaculture day camp in 2006.

    here is a website called Perma-Kidz. some neat stuff kids might like.
    https://www.geocities.com/RainForest/Jun ... makid.html

    i recently came across green teacher magazine which did a whole issue #78 on permaculture and has an article on seedballs in #75.

    finally i would definitely include some earth skills into it. i'll post a list of primitive skills books for children shortly, but for now i hope this is of some use.
     

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