Teaching Namibia's Orphans to grow their own food

Discussion in 'Jobs, projects, courses, training, WWOOFing, volun' started by permup, Aug 8, 2011.

  1. permup

    permup Junior Member

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    The Philadelphia Foundation for Orphans in Distress works in Northern Namibia and aims to promote the quality of care and support to orphans within their communities.
    Several strategies are followed to reach this goal, whereby education and self sufficiency play a major role. Read more at
    www.philadelphianamibia.org/en/
    HIV/AIDS in Namibia is a critical public health issue. The prevalence of HIV in Namibia is among the highest in the world. Since 1996, HIV has been the leading cause of death in the country. Close to 17 per cent of the country’s children under the age of 18 are orphaned by at least one parent – mostly due to HIV. Consequently, life expectancy has declined since independence from 61 years (in 1991) to 49 years in 2001.

    I am travelling to Namibia in September, as a volunteer to work with the Philadelphia Foundation in their attempt to teach children in orphanages how to grow their own food. During my 4 weeks there, I will be educating children and adults alike, and we will be building garden beds and undertaking earth works to harvest precious rain water.
    The following photo shows the sandy soil structure and barren landscape. The challenges are obvious but not insurmountable.


    I have never been to Africa and am sure to find it a culture-shock. These guys may steal my heart!

    If anyone has any specific knowledge of the Grootfontein area in Namibia, I welcome your advice. If anyone wishes to donate money to help, please let me know.
    Thank you
    Paula
    View attachment 1202 View attachment 1203
     

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  2. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    Bless you Paula on your trip to do good things. You may well learn more than you teach! I can recommend a book by Terry Leah ( but I can not fine it atm) The book looks at permaculture in Africa with great attention to customs and traditions and sensitivity to both. I will post it as soon as I find it.
     
  3. permup

    permup Junior Member

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    Hey, that sounds like a great read and very important. Thanks. Yes, I suspect I WILL learn more than I teach - isn't it always the way?
     
  4. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    you can see more here
     
  5. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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  6. ebunny

    ebunny Junior Member

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    Hi Paula

    I spent 15 years living and working in development in Southern Africa. I'd be happy to chat offline if you'd like about the culture and what development approaches have worked best and why
     

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