Tagasaste

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by twiggy, Apr 1, 2003.

  1. twiggy

    twiggy Junior Member

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    A few weeks ago there was some discussion of Tagasaste/tREE Lucerne.
    I am wondering just how frost tolerant it is. Does anyone have any experience of it in fairly cold places where the temp can drop below freezing quite often throughout winter?
    Any ideas for other pioneer legume tree species that would suit this climate?
     
  2. Jeff Nugent

    Jeff Nugent Junior Member

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    It can tolerate some frost. Frost can kill it if it has just been cut back hard.
    Highland Mexico.
    Acacia saligna should go well in your climate.
    Are there any native Leucaena species there?
     
  3. twiggy

    twiggy Junior Member

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    Thanks for the feedback. I'm actually in highland New Mexico, which is in the dear old USA... So we're definitely more temperate than subtropical.
    I'm not sure if there is any leuceana here. There is a Mesquite that grows as a shrub here (in slightly wetter nearby Texas it grows taller into more of a tree) and is a good native pioneer. People do complain that it is impossible to remove once established and it is sort of vicious in a thorny way, which I suppose explains how it survives, even thrives in spite of the overstocking of cattle which is so common here. I guess it has nutritious pods...

    Acacia saligna? where is it from? what is it like? is it a canopy tree? ???
     
  4. Jeff Nugent

    Jeff Nugent Junior Member

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    Something that seems to escape most graziers is that overstocking leads to species which stock won't eat.
    They probably eat the pods though and spread the scarified seed around in convenient packages of manure, ready for the rains.


    Acacia saligna syn. Acacia cyanophylla (golden wreath wattle, western wattle)
    Grows as a dense, bushy shrub or small tree ranging in height from 3 - 8 m. This fast growing, fire retardant, salt tolerant legume is native to the south west of Western Australia, and is able to withstand rainfalls as low as 300 mm. It is well known in cultivation as a valuable hardy ornamental or small shade tree. It occurs in both a suckering and a non - suckering form. The leaves are palatable to livestock when fresh or dried into hay, although have a low digestibility. The damaged bark exudes large amounts of very acidic gum which shows exceptional promise for use in pickles and other foodstuffs. It is suitable for soil stabilisation and does well in sand near coastal areas. The suckering variety readily forms thickets, and it is ideal for low windbreak and erosion control.
    - from Permaculture Plants - a selection.
     
  5. Chook Nut

    Chook Nut Junior Member

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    on a side note..... just be sure you don't suffer from hay fever if your going to use the acacias..... otherwise you will have a problem!

    other than that....it's a nice plant :)
     

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