Super chook to the rescue

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by ho-hum, Apr 17, 2006.

  1. ho-hum

    ho-hum New Member

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    Wonderful Landline story on the super-bantam as developed by a Victorian, Bill Stanhope. Basically this talented man has perfected a leghorn bantam that lays a full-sized egg. The food savings are, I believe, around 20% which is phenomenal for the poultry industry.

    I dont wish to comment on the caged layer industry as whilst I would never practise such things I do believe I have eaten my fair share of battery eggs in my time. This article isnt about that.

    It was also very rewarding to see that this strain of leghorn was the culmination of 40 years or hard work and research and not some genetic snip & tuck.

    The man sounds like a real gentleman as he donated half of a cash prize he won recently to the maintenance of our rare breeds of poultry. He is passionate about the maintenance of these breeds for genetic diversity.

    https://www.dpc.vic.gov.au/domino/W...e6ee2badc7fd12b1ca25712400800ca3!OpenDocument


    For those interested in rare poultry check this site out, especially, if you are interested in displaying your efforts online. https://rarepoultry.net/

    Cheers

    Floot
     
  2. heuristics

    heuristics Junior Member

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    super chook

    Hey Floot, I saw that Landline too..... v interesting.
    Had a few twinges of concern when the talk turned to him passing the genetics over to the German multi-national. And, like you say, another twinge on the factory-farm conditions.....

    Now Floot, on another matter....I was driving home from a permie meeting at midnight last night and had to listen to that deadful night-jock – Spoonman (had to listen cause I find it too much bother to try and reprogram the stations). Anyway, he said someone from Nhulumbuy had had a go at him for saying he broadcast “right across Australia”, because he doesn't aired in Nhulumbuy.
    Now, I thought, I know of someone in Nhulumbuy who might just be cantankerous enough to take issue about a statement like that ..... was it you? Or are there several shit-stirring ole barstards in Nhulumbuy????
     
  3. FREE Permaculture

    FREE Permaculture Junior Member

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    That's great news, bantam leghorns.

    as many councils class them as big birds rather than chooks,
    I could double up with no permit required.

    Cool, bring 'em on
     
  4. ho-hum

    ho-hum New Member

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    :D :D Heuristics,


    There ya go... I have no idea who 'Spoonman' is so I can claim innocence on that one.

    I thought that passing the genetics onto a german multinational was a bit sad too but not much we can say about it.

    Cheers
    Floot
     
  5. Tezza

    Tezza Junior Member

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    I missed the program But I support his ideas and concept,,Knowing that a certain poster here will go ape droppings on my answer but that poster dont post much nownot now they posted lots and gone else where...


    BUT i dont agre on selling the Genetics to German company or any nationality .......Jeees another soul sold to the devil huh......
    I dont think local councills care what size the chook is Its the numbers plus crowing roosters and fussy complaining neighbers that count....

    Tezza
     
  6. FREE Permaculture

    FREE Permaculture Junior Member

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    yeah it does starfish

    the standard chook is a chook, bantams are classed as caged birds,
    you can keep as many as you can pidgeons.

    well my council anyways..
     
  7. Tezza

    Tezza Junior Member

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    Are you thinking of Caging them?

    Tezza the anti caged bird bloke
     
  8. FREE Permaculture

    FREE Permaculture Junior Member

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    no :)
    I have a chook palace, was talking by-laws talk.
     
  9. FREE Permaculture

    FREE Permaculture Junior Member

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    was thinking though, if a little bantam layed a big egg...
    wouldn't it hurt? I mean their vents wouldn't be all that big.
     
  10. ho-hum

    ho-hum New Member

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    Most councils have rules on keeping chooks on standard suburban blocks. Many dont allow it at all. Same goes for pigs.

    There are however a lot of oouncils that will allow bantams as they are considered 'cage birds', same with budgies, pigeons, parrots & canaries. This came about to allow hobbyists to still keep birds.

    I think the Egg Boards and their monopolies in the late 60s bought about many such 'rules' as the Egg Industry was so efficient and such a great local employer that it was unnecessary for chooks to be kept in the back yard.

    This localised industry was very short-lived. During the 70s hundreds of local egg producers went out of business as specialisation forced margins down in the industry.

    This coincided with the boom in supermarkets across the country.

    My property is about 15kms from a RAAF Base, we are 330kms south of Darwin. I cannot keep poultry or any pigs as I have been placed in a buffer zone, the reason is because poultry and pigs encourage sparrows which in turn encourages hawks and falcons which are a flight hazard.

    Anyway, it's one of those statutes they will never enforce, there are no sparrows that far north and I had both chooks & pigs before the buffer zone was established. There will always be someone that wants to impinge on your lifestyle normally they use the rational of saving you.

    Cheers

    Floot
     
  11. Tezza

    Tezza Junior Member

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    Sounds like you n frosty have a common ground ith air force bases

    Tezza
     
  12. FREE Permaculture

    FREE Permaculture Junior Member

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    Speaking of chooks, here a list of bad plants..

    Plants Toxic to Poultry

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)
    American Coffee Berry Tree see Kentucky Coffee Tree
    Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis L.)
    Bouncing Bet (Saponaria officinalis L.)
    Bull Nettle (Solanum carolinense L.)
    Bracken or Brake Fern (Pteridium aquilinum L.)
    Burning Bush see Fireweed
    Buttercup (Ranunculus spp.)
    Carelessweed see Pigweed
    Castor Bean (Ricinus communis L.)
    Clover, Alsike & Other Clovers (Trifolium hybridum L. & other species)
    Cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium L.)
    Creeping Charlie see Ground Ivy
    Crown of Thorns (Euphorbia milii)
    Curly Dock (Rumex crispus L.)
    Daffodil (Narcissus spp.)
    Delphinium (Delphinium spp.)
    Devil's Trumpet see Jimson Weed
    Dogbane (Apocynum spp.)
    Dutchman's Breeches (Dicentra cucullaria (L.) Bernh.)
    Elderberry (Sambucus canadensis L.)
    English Ivy (Hedera helix L.)
    Ergot (Claviceps purpurea (Fr.) Tul.)
    Fern, Bracken (Pteridium aquilinum L.)
    Fireweed (Kochia scoparia L.)
    Foxglove (Digitalis purpurea L.)
    Ground Ivy (Glecoma hederacea L.)
    Hemlock
    Poison (Conium maculatum L.)
    Water (Cicuta maculata L.)
    Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.)
    Horse Chestnut, Buckeyes (Aesculus hippocastanum L.)
    Horse Nettle (Solanum carolinense L.)
    Horsetails (Equisetum arvense L. & other species)
    Hyacinth (Hyacinth orientalis)
    Hydrangea (Hydrangea spp.)

    Ivy
    English (Hedera helix L.)
    Ground (Glecoma hederacea L.)
    Poison (Toxicodendron radicans (L.) Kuntze)

    Jack-in-the-Pulpit (Arisaema spp.)
    Jamestown Weed see Jimson Weed
    Japanese Yew (Taxus cuspidata Sieb. & Zucc.)
    Jerusalem Cherry (Solanum pseudocapsicum L.)
    Jimson Weed (Datura stramonium L.)
    Kentucky Coffee Tree (Gymnocladus dioica (L.) K. Koch)
    Kentucky Mahagony Tree see Kentucky Coffee Tree
    Klamath Weed see St. Johnswort
    Lamb's Quarters (Chenopodium album L.)
    Lantana (Lantana camara L.)
    Larkspur (Delphinium spp.)
    Lily-of-the-Valley (Convallaria majalis)
    Lupine (Lupinus spp.)
    Mad Apple see Jimson Weed
    Mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum L.)
    Milkweed, Common (Asclepias syriaca L.)
    Mint, Purple (Perilla frutescens)
    Nicker Tree see Kentucky Coffee Tree
    Nightshade (Solanum spp.)
    Oleander (Nerium oleander L.)
    Ohio Buckeye (Aesculus glabra Willd.)
    Philodendron (Philodendron spp.)
    Pigweed (Amaranthus spp.)
    Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum L.)
    Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron radicans (L.) Kuntze)
    Poke (Phytolacca americana L.)
    Purple Mint (Perilla frutescens)
    Redroot see Pigweed
    Rhododendron (Rhododendron spp.)
    Rhubarb (Rheum rhaponticum L.)
    Squirrelcorn (Dicentra canadensis (Goldie) Walp.) see Dutchman's Breeches
    Staggerweed (Dicentra spp.) see Dutchman's Breeches
    St. Johnswort (Hypericum perforatum L.)
    Stink Weed see Jimson Weed
    Stump Tree see Kentucky Coffee Tree
    Sudan Grass (Sorghum vulgare var. sudanense Hitchc.)
    Summer Cypress see Fireweed
    Thorn Apple see Jimson Weed
    Tulip (Tulipa spp.)
    Water Hemlock (Cicuta maculata L.)
    White Snakeroot (Eupatorium rugosum Hout.)
    Wild Onion (Allium spp.)
    Yellow Sage see Lantana
     
  13. Tezza

    Tezza Junior Member

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    That list could meen anything I noticed one ...Niteshade........tell that to my chooks who actually jump up to eat the fruit,Ive even eaten the berrys as well,though the taste leaves a bit to be desired....As a chook breeder on an open range pasture..Yes those plants may well kill a chook,pobly humans too
    cow,horses,etc etc.
    Doesnt mean to say that they would actually eat that vegetation as under 17 yrs observation ive lost next to non losses attributable to eating of toxic vegetation.Me thinks that Animals,poultry maybe/mustbe able to differentuate good and bad vegation unless driven by hunger to eat anything
    unless its good for them.... or at Least ok to eat sparingly some vegetations herbs with me, are poisness to eat ,so thay say. but browsing is ok,its natures way of controling pests nd parasites,eg Wormwoods,Mints,Tansey

    Tezza
     
  14. ho-hum

    ho-hum New Member

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    Chickadee,


    That list doesnt really fit with my own experience and reading. If you do a web search on ''free-range poultry pasture'' you will find they all advocate a legume or legume/grass mix which is based on alfalfa & clovers.

    I located this site https://www.library.uiuc.edu/vex/toxic/comlist.htm that would appear to mirror your list.

    Under alfalfa, which is listed, these were the notes.


    Under clovers, this was quoted for toxicity:

    Chooks are pretty bulletproof little beasties when it comes to their care. I cannot remember my chooks actively grazing dewy lucerne or clovers. Normally when the plants are still wet they are scratching away at the dirt and occassionally grabbing a top leaf.

    It is good to know though that under certain conditions these plants can be toxic. I would imagine that this would only appear if dewy fodder were fed to hungry chooks.

    Something else I picked up on whilst picking through the list was I had always believed that spoiled hay was ok for chooks. Certainly I cannot remember ever harming any chooks with spoiled hay but I dont think I would use it as a floor or nest covering again.

    Cheers

    Floot
     
  15. FREE Permaculture

    FREE Permaculture Junior Member

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    Hi Floot,

    Yeah i didn't notice the clover, and am pretty sure red clover is a goodie, not a baddie.

    oh well, maybe i should delete that one and alfalfa is strange too.
    it was copied from somewhere i had it in my notes.
    well, don't go ripping out everything :)
    maybe just use it as a guide for really paranoid chook owners :)
    then seek a second opinion re google or something.
     
  16. ho-hum

    ho-hum New Member

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    Chickadee,

    Someone has to lobby for the chooks and their diet :D :D :D and besides I am fairly certain you can google up any required 'answer' you want these days.


    Just think it has taken we humans 30 years to get red wine and chocolate off the blacklist. I cant see us ever really having beer, smokes or loose women put back on the list of things to be taken in moderation.

    Guess we just have to be thankful for small miracles.

    8) 8) :shock: Floot
     
  17. Dani

    Dani Junior Member

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    deadly nightshade is poisonous, but is not found in the Australasian region. In Australia we get blackberry nightshade which is harmless so long as the berries are ripe. My chooks love them too especially my lorpies.
     
  18. Mungbeans

    Mungbeans Junior Member

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    We have heaps of blackberry nightshade on our property. I can guage what the chickens like to eat plant wise because their coop has a lot of vegetation growing in it. They free range half the day, and so only eat plants inside the coop that they like. Mostly the only plant left in the coop is grass. There are no clumping seeding grass in the coop. The coop is also the only place on the property without a blackberry nightshade problem, so they must nibble on it.
     

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