Strawbales !!!!!

Discussion in 'Designing, building, making and powering your life' started by mutley, Jun 3, 2012.

  1. mutley

    mutley Junior Member

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    Hi guys,
    We have a caravan with a hard anexxe attached on 5 acres. We are happy & comfortable for now with the dwelling. Wondering if anyone knows if we could 'clad' this structure with strwbale & render ?

    Also does anyone know where i can buy strawbales to build with in the Sydney area?

    Thanks
    Mutley
     
  2. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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  3. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    No reason you can't, but make sure your roof line goes out about 1.5m past the walls to insure water not splashing onto the walls once they are rendered with plaster. There are a ton of books on strawbale building, and welcome to the club!! :D
     
  4. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    first mutley,

    will the local council approve the dwelling?

    len
     
  5. Mudman

    Mudman Junior Member

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  6. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Always do your homework with something like this. No vapor barriers, making sure there is airflow in the bales, proper plasters over the bales, no seeds in the bales.. I could go on and on till the break of someone's dawn. ;)
     
  7. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    straw bale is not sustainable anyway as the straw comes from broad-acre grain farms, where habitat has been destroyed for that grain, a big carbon footprint for those who profess intelligence in that area, collecting it baling it tight enough with enough ties, then transporting it huge distances for use by those who think this way, a very expensive way to build, and down south someplace some enviro' group was trying to be yuppy by building from straw bale, yup they got it wrong they did not account fro how mush space the bales needed so the cement slab was too small built for normal construction, so the use of straw bale takes more cement resources, unless we reduce our standard to living on mud floors. the unknown also might be how much decomposing goes on under the plaster until contained oxygen is depleted? when a crack occurs termites will eat straw just as soon as eat wood. then cement plaster won't really stop any musty smell from the bales those who live with it will grow with it.

    so it is just another building style fro those who wish to be seen to be different.

    len
     
  8. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Len, I must say you seem in a particularly grumpy mood these days. Is everything ok?

    There's no such thing as sustainable housing in the industrial societies. Yes we probably should go back to mud floors where that is appropriate.

    Strawbale works very well in the right situation. The Lawton's did a project in Iraq in the early 2000s, where strawbale houses were built in an area that had lots of crops but no timber. Makes sense to me.


    https://www.permaculture.org.au/newsletters/december2003.htm
     
  9. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    maybe some crossing up of issues here pebble?

    i am talking australian, where before we try to make straw bale housing look sustainable we regrow our habitat forest.

    len
     
  10. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Australia seems a good climate for strawbale. I also think timber is an excellent building material and support regrowing forest including forestry. I just don't see those things as being mutually exclusive.

    I'm not sure what's happening in Oz with the building industry, but assume you are still importing timber from elsewhere like NZ does. Like I said, there's no such thing as sustainable housing in our countries, so it comes down to best practice with the available resources.

    Strawbale seems like a good possible medium term solution for mutley.
     
  11. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    A person could grow their own straw and not make a huge issue out of it. A person could get straw from sources other then broad acreage grain farms. Certainly more sustainable then clear cutting a forest for a stick construction methods.
     
  12. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Inspiration.

    [video]https://youtu.be/qqFzrUj-CZ8[/video]
     
  13. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    g'day paka,

    have you calculated how many bales needed to build a home that will be approved? i dunno, but ti will be more tan 1 or ten, growing your own grain might fetch a bale or 2, most grain farms are broad acre they have to be for the farmer to make a bob out of it, so the tree decimation is past and complete. and now that the trees are gone they will grow grain while it is a viable operation, then they walk away from a man created desert, and unlike mining co's who have to rehabilitate the area farmers don't have that responsibility, so stupid gov's plant windmills. or they sub-divide it into housing/industrial developments.

    len
    len
     
  14. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    Sure Len. But forestry isn't being done in a sustainable way either. If I need to build a house this year, and straw is available or unsustainable timber, why is the straw bad but the timber good?
     
  15. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    over here pebble,

    the straw comes as a result of damaging unsustainable practise. so does plantation timbers, they clear fell habitat forest to plant pine trees, i live in an area where their plans failed, now there are lots of radiata pines that when someone want to build will be pushed into piles and burnt much like bio-char, and the resultant ash gets pushed around to turn into terra preta a thousand years from now. you recognise that forestry is not being managed and habitat developed, that is the only factor that is real not theory.

    len
     
  16. pebble

    pebble Junior Member

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    "now there are lots of radiata pines that when someone want to build will be pushed into piles and burnt much like bio-char"

    Why will they be burning trees instead of using them??
     
  17. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    that the rule pebble,

    a failed timber growing plan by gov' decimate habitat for no purpose, now when someone wants their acre readied for house building there is no control that says the nearest mill must harvest the trees even for wood chip 9anotehr wasted process), you see this was state forest the gov' then sold it to private people, then the gov' had second thoughts when they were madly into growing pine forests, they then clear felled and planted pines which was low producing so the gov' sold it back to the original private owners who then subdivided and sold it to people like us over about the past 40 years. these are the real things that those who worship science theory don't get involved with, they voted for a bloke who said he would stop old growth forest destruction, he did not keep his promise as most pollies don't there is now a brand spanking new pulp mill in place the rule of thumb if a tree is over 80 meters tall it must not be felled, real pie in the sky stuff hey.

    so up here they are still raping hard wood forests and their own pine plantations to send trees from as far north as maryborough down to the port of brisbane to be chipped all those timber jinka's plying the dangerous highway. talk about a waste.

    hope that goes someway to giving the picture.

    we have our pile of trees that we are harvesting usable posts and fire wood(for others to burn and cause pollution) from before we have our bio-char bonfire. we are saving much to build our gardens with, but the pine in the pile has absolutely no use, it is termite food and burns too easily.

    this is an unresponsibilty policy of the gov' once someone else buys it it belongs to that owner the problem and all. we would love to have chipped it all but would cost a fortune, same as taking it to green refuse station cost a fortune.

    len
     
  18. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    can't again edit my post,

    should have added pebble,

    there is a real world out there with real living factual issues, no theory involved. and no ego's they all follow theory.

    len
     
  19. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    What's more 'sustainable' though, Len? Strawbale or steel like your place? How about Earthbag?
     
  20. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    at least our place is completely termite proof for ever without a single drop of chemicals, it won't rot, it will handle higher storm ratings, and won't burn like the wooden ones do. with earth the dirt has to come from somewhere if taken from virgin ground it is then habitat, if bought in by truck not desirable and very expensive, what we have is affordable.

    if straw bale became more popular it would become more expensive and in times of drought no grain no straw.

    len
     

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