Stone fruit!

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by andrew curr, Jan 11, 2015.

  1. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    Have a few necterines/peaches almost ripe
    Can i protect the tree with shadecloth or will that affect ripening! Fruit flies usually an issue!
    Birds got every apricot off :rofl:a mature tree!
     
  2. Terra

    Terra Moderator

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    Yes I would last year I draped 50% cloth over my plum trees which are already fully bird net covered and it stopped the sun burn on the nasty days , I have sun damage already this year so must get that done . Peaches and nectarines have heavy shade from foliage anyway so I doubt it will make any difference to ripening if it does slow them a bit its all good as the sunny side will ripen first and you might get a bit more time to guzzle them .
     
  3. Mirrabooka

    Mirrabooka Junior Member

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    Is it true that stone fruit seeds grow true to the taste of the parent plants?
     
  4. Brian Knight

    Brian Knight Junior Member

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    Cant help with that question and I would be curious what people's thoughts are to nursery stock. Arent the root grafts that come with nursery plants a good thing in most cases?
     
  5. Brian Knight

    Brian Knight Junior Member

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    Come to think of it, a seed would represent pollination and genetic variation so while the offspring would probably be close to the parents it might be better or worse. Only a cutting would be an exact match to the parent. I know that many prefer to grow from seed though.
     
  6. Mirrabooka

    Mirrabooka Junior Member

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    The issue of growing such fruit trees from seed appeals from the aesthetic of self sufficiency and the realities of the budget. Growing true to seed apparently never occurs with apple or avocado (although I am growing from seed in these cases to identify rootstock for my plot onto which to graft named varieties later), but there is a 'rumour' out there that stone fruit preserve the character of the parents rather than throwing up the wide divergence of apple and avocado....my most tasty apricots are from a solo self pollinating tree, and that is another variable, to what extent the axiom that 'seeds from self pollinated trees lack vigour' applies, another concern awaiting testing...
     
  7. Bryant RedHawk

    Bryant RedHawk Junior Member

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    No this is not particularly true except in large orchards where all trees are the same variety and species.
    The paradox is that we would love to be able to grow these from seed and that they will be true to species, however, since most all fruit trees (stone fruit or not) produce more quantity and quality when cross pollinated, they do not produce seeds that will grow true to a particular species for taste, texture or longevity post harvest.
     
  8. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    andrew, I've had good luck with a white bed sheet snaked among the top branches of an apricot or peach tree to stop birds and squirrels. I prop it up with a broom. Those critters don't want anything coming over their heads, so they won't go under it. I move it around maybe every 2 weeks so they won't get used to it. It is only up there for about 4-6 weeks, so it may look funky, but it's a good way to stop them.

    And you probably don't want to wait until the fruit is really ripe, pick it a couple of days early, especially if you are canning. The higher acid content is important for canning, and fruit can sweeten up a bit over a couple of days on the counter.

    About the pits for starters, they aren't reliable. Clippings of branches are not only reliable, but they get roots on them much more quickly, and will form nice little branched "shrubs" often in the first year.
     
  9. Curramore1

    Curramore1 Junior Member

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    Hi Andrew,
    our grafted, low chill varieties of peach and nectarine are ripe in mid-late October. Old school varieties just suffer severely from a combination of fruit fly and brown rot when they are ripe at Christmas. I bud graft and cleft graft the scions of the low chill varieties onto seedlings from those old school varieties in late winter. I prune the stonefruit trees in late winter/early spring and thin probably 70% of the fruit by hand as well when it sets in August/September. We also mid-summer prune after the fruit have all finished, about two thirds of the new growth is trimmed. We are in a Queensland fruit fly area, so I use a fine gauze mozzy net over the whole tree and tie at the base, as they are already pollinated the insects are not needed. The fruit bats sometimes tear holes in it but I just patch it by closing the hole and twisting a rubber band over to seal. The main problem we have is fungal, with brown rot the main culprit on the fruit in humid years. It is pretty hard to grow them here with minimal inputs, so the earlier varieties we usually get away with before it warms up and the fruit fly populations build. I am lucky that there are no concentrations of fruit trees within a couple of km here and we collect and feed all fallen fruit daily to the cows, pigs, chooks or sheep. The current fig crop just coming on has not yet been attacked except by sawfly larvae and figbirds, fingers crossed. The mangoes and persimmons are just about ripe, but already under siege from hungry possums and fruit bats. Have been making green mango pickle and chutneys. I reckon as long as we get 20% of the total crop that is Ok and meets our needs and then some. Dug out the Fowler jars today and gave the first wash, ready to make a few jars of preserved fruit next week or so. I like to look at those jars all lined up on the wall full of preserved fruits over the winter, they go great with winter custard desserts too.
     
  10. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    net was working well

    but then the possums/rats got under it!!

    I got a1/4 peach very nice Possum pie is looking more appertising each day!:rofl:
     

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