Solar Air conditioning

Discussion in 'Designing, building, making and powering your life' started by nicktman, Nov 12, 2010.

  1. nicktman

    nicktman New Member

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    Hi I have a friend who is looking at purchasing https://www.sola-mate.com/ has anyone had any experience with these or know of other products that could do the same??

    Cheers
     
  2. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    As this is vaguely relevant spam I am letting it (grumpilly) though
     
  3. Terra

    Terra Moderator

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    Found this while scratching around would do a similiar job with the summer exhaust vent fitted , build yourself if you were a bit handy , i guess these sort of things are desirable if you live where people are undesirable and you have to keep everything locked up , glad its not like that here .

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trombe_wall
     
  4. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

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    People should build homes that don't require air conditioning. Its not that hard. though i know if you house is already built its a different story. There are modification that can be made to cool it down as well.
     
  5. nicktman

    nicktman New Member

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    Thank guy's I have passed on the comments.

    I believe my friend has recently purchase her house and was looking for more sustainable way's to heat and cool her house which is in Melbourne.
    I will continue to research this for her and will no doubt learn something along the way.

    I in no way intended this to be spam, I am only trying to help a friend out who has be come interested in sustainable living and has asked for my advice.

    Cheers
    Nick
     
  6. pierre

    pierre Junior Member

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    Nick 'n all,

    "Solar air-conditioning" this is a classic example of greenwash gadgetry and of our "conditioning" to think high tech is the only tech.

    I believe for every high-tech solution to a challenge, there is a low-tech solution to match which costs less to install, operate and maintain.

    The best low tech solution has already been mentioned: build or buy a passive solar house in the first instance.

    For retrofitting an existing house:
    - "lean-to" greenhouse to north facing side of house combined with shade house to the south (e.g. discussed in Bill Mollison's works)
    - trombe wall to north of house for heating in winter, with geothermal cooling for summer
    - combination of above

    With "geothermal cooling" I mean burying a pipe underground (intake to be on south side of the house, ideally inside a shade house for best results) and venting into the house at strategic points. Hot air in the house will rise, and if a vent high up is provided to allow the hot air to escape, it will cause the cool air to be sucked from the shade house via the buried pipe and into the house. The "vent high up" could be roof-mounted whirly birds (that could be shut off in winter), a top opening window, etc.

    These systems have minimal moving parts, hence tend to break less. When they do break, they can be fixed with materials bought from your favourite hardware outlet, or even from salvaged materials.

    Someone I know has recently installed such a system at a local primary school as a pilot/demonstration project. The building has not been occupied yet, but they are planning to take measurements to provide some useful data for designers of such systems.

    I'm personally planning to implement a shade house/trombe wall system for my own house.

    Regards,
    Pierre
     
  7. sun burn

    sun burn Junior Member

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    some other passive ideas are
    1. one of those air vent things in the roof. Or more than one to let out the hot air.
    2. Add some sort of shutter blind to the windows outside to stop sun hitting the glass. In places like melbourne if they got a traditional brick house, they should keep the windows shut in the morning until at least the inside temperature is the same as the outside. We used to do this in Sydney and it worked well.
    3. Plant deciduous shrubs or trees right outside windows and walls that catch a lot of summer sun. The north wall i guess. Even a trellis with a deciduous vine would be good.
    4. Now i know they don't do this in houses very often but on the boat we used to have a big wind funnel that would catch the breeze and send it down into the front of the boat where we otherwise had little ventilation. It was a good cooling breeze that came through there. We used an piece of old parachute for this. Spinaker would also work. The chute should extend well down into the house not just stop at the ceiling. If you build a hatch like on a boat where the opening is to the roof, you have an airtight, watertight sunlight when the thing is not in use. You can use tinted glass if you don't want the light.
    5. She get insulation put into her ceiling.

    To stop the house being hot on summer nights she should make sure the walls don't heat up in the first place. Plants are good for this.
     
  8. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper Senior Member

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    I had an old house built pre refrigerators it had a pantry with slotted shelves and a fly wire covered vent on the floor and a chimney vent through the roof.It pulled cool air from under the house and kept pretty cool.
    Also having a chimney in the kitchen created a great draft when the front door was opened,the down side was inhaling car fumes as someone drove by.
    But to adapt these techniques would give the desired effect especially if it ran through a shade house first.
    I'm lucky to live in a part of Australia that doesn't require heating or cooling just ceiling fans, sea breezes and cross drafts for me
     
  9. SueUSA

    SueUSA Junior Member

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    Use natural thermal convection to draw cool air in and expell hot air.

    At least one side of a house is usually cooler than the others. Install intake vents near the floor, and plant shrubs in front of them. Keeping them moist helps.

    Install an exit(s) near the ceiling across the room or house for the hot air to exit.

    As air heats up, it rises and goes out the upper vents. This draws in cool air from the lower vents, which moves across the room/house, and it rises as it warms and leaves near the ceiling.

    When the sun sets, the thermosiphon effect slows or stops, and the most you should need is a small fan or two to force the hot air out faster, which would draw in the cool air faster. If you have several windows that the sun shines on, you may not even need the fans. The hotter the air, the faster the air moves.

    Sue
     

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