sick peas

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by katrina, Nov 26, 2007.

  1. katrina

    katrina Junior Member

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    I haven't had any luck with my searching in the forum, so here is my question:
    my peas have developed some sort of nasty. the leaves have white and black stuff on them, the white stuff drops off onto plants below. the peas get black dots on the shells and the peas inside become bitter, picked undersized, they are still ok, if not sweet and buttery; if left long enough on the vine, the peas go all black and "sooty". can the plants go into the compost, or should they be binned? should i tear the roots out too?
    After a big rain, followed by hot weather last month we had lots of aphids, then lots of ladybirds. the ladybirds are still there, but we now have heaps of small white insects, with a yellow band near the front and small rectangular-shaped spots on the left and right of the body, going all the way down the body.
    the peas are snow peas and sugar snap peas. there are new shoots that are green and unaffected, with healthy peas growing, but the rest are either yellowing or brown (ie. dead). hope i've provided enough info, regards, kat
     
  2. permup

    permup Junior Member

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    Sick Peas

    Hi Kat

    Your peas have contracted a fairly common mould which is prolific in hot wet conditions. Its probably a bit late in the season to be getting good results from peas anyway. I would cut them all back (you don't need to tear the roots out) and use them as mulch.

    Plant peas in Autumn because they grow best in cool conditions. The best way to NOT get moulds on your peas is preventative. Mix some milk with some water and spray the foliage regularly (particularly after it has rained). The milk sets up its own bacteria on the leaves which are not harmful to the peas and thus "crowd" the surface area, leaving no room for moulds to take hold.

    Having said that, even my best pea crops (and they are spectacular) eventually fall prey to mould. I just let them go when that happens.

    Best of luck with your next crop!

    Paula
    https://www.permup.com
     
  3. katrina

    katrina Junior Member

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    thanks for the feedback. we were lucky to plant them in may and have ahd a lovely snowpea crop. i had free-range kids there for a while! after a run-in with some hungry crows i wa sdelighted to see some sugar snaps grow--and then the dreaded mould hit them grrr..

    good to know i can use the leaves as mulch. i was planning to plant capsicum and eggplant where the peas had been, but am worried the bugs on the peas, or the mould on the leaves will affect them. is it pea -specific, or might it hit my beans, any other plants?
    i can put the chooks on first, but am also worried about them eating the mould. is this likely to be a problem?
    thanks again, kat
     
  4. permup

    permup Junior Member

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    Sick Peas

    Ideally I would either lay the leaves out in the sun until they are dry and then use as mulch, but if you have chooks, give it to them to sort out. It won't hurt them and they will love the bugs.

    Paula
     
  5. katrina

    katrina Junior Member

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    the info has been very useful. i'm new to all this, and in between trying not to kill my chickens and keeping crows off the veges and water to the veges, it's been a great learning experience.
    i've managed to name the insect,thanks to google and some time and creative search phrases, and, no surprise to some i am sure: it is the larva of illeis galbula: the fungus eating ladybird.
    i am now concerned about the fungus moving over to my melons and cucumbers. particularly when i chop this stuff down and either lay it down or move it past the other bed to the compost.
    would a preventative spray of milk and water be useful on my little plants?
    thanks for the help so far,kat
     
  6. permup

    permup Junior Member

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    sick peas

    Kat, your melons and cucumbers would also be susceptable I would imaging. Yes, keep them away and give to the chooks.
     
  7. IntensiveGardener

    IntensiveGardener Junior Member

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    Kat,
    I'v also had this problem with peas, and yes, it did move onto the Zuccs, melons, cucumbers, pumpkins etc...
    Once the vines of either plant are badly covered with mildew there's not a great deal you can do. I savagely thinned the peas out and let them shoot again and got a small crop but it was hardly worth it.
    Prevention is the best method. If you see the first signs of mould you can catch it early and prolong the cropping period a bit.

    Milk works ok but to really work it needs to be un-pasturized. As someone said it is a bacterial thing so the pasturization process kills many of the bacteria you want. I'm told it works wonders with milk straight from the cow but i havn't had the chance to try it yet.

    Other things to consider are:
    Lectric soda (aka washing soda). i mixed this with a very small amount of linseed oil and lots of water and it did a good job as a foliar spray. Like i said though, you have to catch it early.

    This year i have planted the peas more thinly and left large gaps between different beds of them.
    The pumpkin family plants are over the other side of the garden. Air cirulation helps prevent moulds.
    cheers,
    IG
     
  8. rhancock

    rhancock Junior Member

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    I've found the milk to be very effective, but also, don't forget that with crops like pumpkins, you're not going to be eating the leaves, so the only harm will be if the powdery mildew is widespread enough to prevent adequate photosynthesis. The last couple of years I've just left it alone and it hasn't become a serious problem. There was a short discussion on https://www.backyardpoultry.com about feeding powdery mildew to chooks here: https://forum.backyardpoultry.com/viewto ... light=milk , but it wasn't really conclusive.
     
  9. katrina

    katrina Junior Member

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    thanks all.
    richard, the byp site is down at the moment, but i'll try again later. i have also posted the question there.
    grr.. i caught the girls eating my lettuce in our only unnetted vege bed 10 minutes ago...
    kat
     
  10. katrina

    katrina Junior Member

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    oh, Richard, i got onto the site, delighted that someone had found a relevant thread when i hadn't been able to...unfortunately it's the thread i started!
    it's sweet of you to have gone to the trouble for me, thanks,
    kat
     
  11. Duckpond

    Duckpond Junior Member

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    I spray all my plant with Seasol every 2 weeks, and burn any fungal infected leaves. I get almost no problems
     

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