Seed Rearing Mix Recipe...

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by katsparrow, Mar 21, 2011.

  1. katsparrow

    katsparrow Junior Member

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    Hi,
    I am after a really good but easy to make seed rearing mix that I can make myself. I have a two year old who is also a passionate gardener so I need a mix that is fine for her to work with and possibly a mix that she can help make. She loves to be involved in all aspects!
    Any ideas/suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks.
     
  2. pippimac

    pippimac Junior Member

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    I mixed compost, expanded perlite and coconut fibre in % that felt 'right'.
    I made it once and have been pretty much recycling it ever since.
    When I need to make more, in a decade or so, I'll be using something more local and sustainable than perlite and coconut fibre.
    Conventional wisdom say 'never reuse seed-raising mix or you get damping-off'.
    Never had it, but I spose I'd just chuck it on the compost.
     
  3. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    The secret Purple Pear recipe (shhhh don't tell Mark I told you) is equal parts crusher dust and cocopeat. That's the seed raising mix. To get to mature potting mix you add compost. I've been using it for about 6 months now and it works well. Cheaper than store bought too.
     
  4. katsparrow

    katsparrow Junior Member

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    Where do you source crusher dust and cocopeat from?
     
  5. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Crusher dust from the local landscaping supplier - take a bucket. I get 2 bucket fulls for $2. Cocopeat from the hardware store. Can't remember the exact price but I think it's about $6 for a brick that makes a bucketful when rehydrated.
     
  6. Dreamie

    Dreamie Junior Member

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    I was looking at making some seed raising mix starting this year (for next winter, maybe next summer.) I haven’t done this yet so it will be a bit of trial and error.

    The process I have been looking at is leaf mould mixed with worm castings and perlite.

    The leaf mould is made by mowing the autumn leaves and placing them in a 75l garbage bin. The leaves will break down overtime by fungal and bacterial activity (6months – 1 year+ ). This should leave me with a water holding substance that is extremely high in carbon.

    Add to this a nitrogen source in worm castings and the perlite to stop the whole thing from being too dense and enabling air to circulate through the mixture.

    I get a huge amount of leaves and was trying to work out a way to compost them all while also trying to find a source of nitrogen and stumbled upon leaf mould and its potential use as a seed raising mix.
     
  7. adrians

    adrians Junior Member

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    I've had good sucess with simply seived compost.. i actually just use a seedling tray with small holes for a seive. I do two levels of sieving

    1) 10mm chicken wire on some mesh placed on top of wheel-barrow... throw the compost from the heap onto the mesh with a shovel and shake.. this gets rid of all of the large stuff.
    2) sieve smaller for starting seedlings..

    I'm sure it might be improved with something like sand to make it slightly more free-draining.. but it does ok.
     
  8. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    I tried compost but had low germination rates and lots of unwanted seeds instead. Obviously my pile isn't quite hot enough!
     
  9. permasculptor

    permasculptor Junior Member

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    Equal parts of river sand and aged cow poo.
     
  10. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    to keep the seedlings from any transplant "surprise" I use 1/2 my soil (which is clay, so they will recognize it when they get transplanted) and sifted compost and granite sand. Every other watering is with diluted compost tea. I haven't had any damping off for years.

    I'm curious, do you guys worry about adding perlite to your soil year after year? Won't it change the way the soil holds water?
     
  11. anapaine

    anapaine New Member

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    Seed Rearing Mix Recipe...

    Hi katsparrow,

    Just two days back I read about Cocopeat. BioActive Cocopeat is a recycled organic product originating from pure cocopeat. Cocopeat comes from the husk of the coconut and is widely used around the world as a superior high quality growing media due to its unique aeration and water-holding qualities. and It is not harmful to Children as well.
    For more details read article on: https://hub.me/adTgb
    or Visit: bioactivepeat.com.au
     
  12. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Anapaine I have some concerns about your claim that you only just heard about cocopeat when your profile states it as your interest and contains a link to the bioactive peat website (I've deleted the link from your profile BTW). I'm allowing your post to come through to the board as it may be of some interest but we don't approve of the use of the message board for blatant commercial advertising. If you wish to genuinely contribute to the community here then you are welcome to do so.
     
  13. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    Rock on, Eco!! and honestly, what organic matter is harmful to children? what????? and has anyone tried to compost the husk of a coconut? It's right up there with nuclear waste, *joke* not sure it will happen in my lifetime!!! :)
     
  14. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Unfortunately Coco peat is not a good alternative for "real" peat.
    Coco "peat" does not hold as much water, it is not as acid, it breaks down faster and may not be sterile (?)
    I have had less success with cuttings and seedlings using it rather than peat
    However its sustainability and environmental credentials are better.
     
  15. matto

    matto Junior Member

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    Water weeds like azolla and salvinia when dried out and sieved make a great alternative you could grow at home, or clean up a nutrient laden waterway.
     

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