Scientists that stress co-operation rather then competition in nature?

Discussion in 'The big picture' started by call-u-one, Jan 17, 2013.

  1. call-u-one

    call-u-one Junior Member

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    Hello!

    I am searching for scientists that stress co-operation rather then competition in nature. I've been reading a bit about James Lovelocks GAIA hypothesis. He is focusing alot on how we have live in symbiosis with the atmosphere, but I am more interested in eco-systems and how living organisms co-operate willingly and unwillingly in a eco-system. Please share names if you know any.
     
  2. ecodharmamark

    ecodharmamark Junior Member

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    G'day K-J

    Bioregionalists understand ecosystems to be cooperative.

    Cheerio, Markos
     
  3. LisaJensen

    LisaJensen Junior Member

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    Mainstream ecologists study the cooperation that occurs within ecosystems. Check out some of the major journals, like the Journal of Ecology, International Journal of Ecosystems or Ecological Engineering. Search for key words you're interested in, like symbiotic, interaction, interdependent, parasitic... read articles and find scientists who are interested in the same things as you are. I'm a scientist, albeit in a different field, but that is how I find the people I want to collaborate with. After 5 minutes on google I found titles like "Socialism in soil? The importance of mycorrhizal fungal networks for facilitation in natural ecosystems", "Do Ants Feed Plants?" and "Plant-mediated interactions between above- and below-ground communities at multiple trophic levels".

    Lisa
     
  4. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    The most important of all symbiotic relationships (for us) was photosynthesis

    More recently, we cart around 10 bacterial cells for every one of our own
     
  5. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Anemone fish & Anemone
    Anemone Shrimp & Anemone
    Decorator Crabs
    There are shrimp that live with fish
    Pompom Crabs
    Remora
    Christmas Tree Tube Worms
    Woodpecker & trees
    Coral Reef... my god... life feeds on life feeds on life to make one.

    This is off the top of my head. Clownfish is the same as Anemone fish. However, Anemone fish is more accurate amongst biologists.


    However, the one thing that NEEDS to be researched more IMO...

    Mycellium hyphae in a forest. The things interconnect every single plant, fern, tree, shrub, bush, and mycellium in the forest, and communicate with one another... ..take that internet & avatar! Real life did it first!
     
  6. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    When you think about it, animals are weird. They ignore the abundant source of energy above their heads – the sun – and choose instead to invest vast amounts of energy in cumbersome equipment for eating and digesting food. Why don't they do what plants do, and get their energy straight from sunlight?

    The short answer is that many do. Corals are animals but have algae living in them that use sunlight to make sugar. Many other animals, from sponges to sea slugs, pull the same trick. One species of hornet can convert sunlight into electricity. There are also suggestions that aphids can harness sunlight, although most biologists are unconvinced.

    But all these creatures are only distantly related to us. No backboned animal has been found that can harness the sun – until now. It has long been suspected, and now there is hard evidence: the spotted salamander is solar-powered.

    Plants make food using photosynthesis, absorbing light to power a chemical reaction that converts carbon dioxide and water into glucose and releases oxygen. Corals profit from this reaction by housing photosynthetic algae inside their shells.

    Long-term partners

    Spotted salamanders, too, are in a long-term relationship with photosynthetic algae. In 1888, biologist Henry Orr reported that their eggs often contain single-celled green algae called Oophila amblystomatis. The salamanders lay the eggs in pools of water, and the algae colonise them within hours.
    https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn23090-zoologger-the-first-solarpowered-vertebrate.html
     

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