Salt marsh

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by eco_dreamer, Feb 8, 2011.

  1. eco_dreamer

    eco_dreamer Junior Member

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    What can be done with a salt marsh - is it useful for anything at all? (SE Qld area)

    thanks

    Rachel
     
  2. ecodharmamark

    ecodharmamark Junior Member

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    G'day Rachel

    In answer to the first part of your question, I will suggest, "Protect and enhance".

    In answer to the second part (my emphasis in bold):

    Saltmarsh wetlands are key components of the landscape of the intertidal zone and provide ecosystem services that include:

    regulating services, such as protecting inhabited coastal areas from storm surges; and removing and diluting storm and waste water from urban and irrigation areas;

    cultural services, notably aesthetic values associated with “wilderness areas” that, being inhospitable, are rarely frequented by humans; also education and recreation services where interpretive boardwalks have been built in saltmarshes and mangroves; and,

    supporting services, including food web support (supply of nutrients, such as dead saltmarsh plantmatter, and crab, gastropod and mosquito larvae, on which marine fauna of the lower intertidal zone may depend), and ecological values (saltmarshes are reservoirs of biodiversity in their own right) as described in detail below...


    Cheerio, Markos
     
  3. eco_dreamer

    eco_dreamer Junior Member

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    thanks for that :)

    I was sent a property listing by a real estate agent for a 15ha property which all but about 5 acres is tidal saltmarsh. Apparently the 5 odd acres are within the urban footprint, so a single unit dwelling could built within it but I wasnt sure if that 5 acres would be useable.

    I was also given a bit of a spiel by the agent who claimed the salt marsh is great for livestock(!) which I was pretty shocked by cause I would have thought (and hoped) the EPA would have heavy restrictions in place.

    The property is also near/bordering (possibly within???) a Ramsar site.

    I'm not that interested in the property per say, but for a moment did think it might have been pretty awesome to own such a diverse ecosystem. :grin:
     
  4. ecodharmamark

    ecodharmamark Junior Member

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    G'day Rachel

    If I had a dollar for every time someone said to me, "But the real estate agent said it would be OK...", I would be a very rich person...

    I would be very surprised (not to mention, concerned, as both an academic and a professional land use planner) to find a 15ha allotment - of which 2/3 exists in the intertidal zone - available with planning permission for the construction of a dwelling here in Australia (not including multi-level residential complexes in our major capital cities (al la Brisbane River)... but that's a whole other story).

    For the purpose of an exercise that I am sure we could all learn from, if you can provide me with the (exact) property details, I'd be more than happy to conduct a free preliminary, desk-top statutory planning analysis on the said allotment.

    Cheerio, Markos
     
  5. eco_dreamer

    eco_dreamer Junior Member

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    thanks again, but it would be wasting both your time and mine to research this any further.

    In my former life (pre-kids) I was a conveyancing paralegal so completely understand your comment "but the agent said it would be okay".....I too would be very rich and also wouldnt have had to waste many an hour trying to negotiate buyers out of signing a 'dodgee' contract.

    If I was considering this property further, I'd be making full and proper enquiries through Council, rather than taking the agents advice that there are no building restrictions over the property.

    Purely for interest sake.....here is a link to the property listing.

    https://www.realestate.com.au/property-residential+land-qld-mango+hill-2829661

    Many thanks for your input too :)

    Rachel
     
  6. ecodharmamark

    ecodharmamark Junior Member

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    G'day Rachel

    No worries (upon viewing the aerial, I see exactly what you mean).

    Markos
     
  7. purecajn

    purecajn Junior Member

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    https://www.enchantedlearning.com/biomes/marsh/freshwater.shtml -[this is just ment for visual idea of wildlife in marsh. I'm not endorsing any membership) is it saltwater or brackish water? As far as "livestock" living in marsh conditions https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1096-3642.1887.tb02977.x/abstract they are susceptible to hoof diseases. I did read somewhere that rice and cranberries can be grown there. Whatever you choose to do with it, may the earth shine her blessings upon you.
     
  8. purecajn

    purecajn Junior Member

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    Also read this recently and thought of your post. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-12046805 Due to flooding the local farmers are raising crab, and making more money than they were. If life give you lemons make lemon-aid. If it gives you brackish water, raise crabs.
     
  9. Yukkuri_Kame

    Yukkuri_Kame Junior Member

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    I spent a lot of time in salt water & brackish marshes as a kid. They are prolific ecosystems of very high productivity, the foundation of rich estuary food-chains. It's all edge. Assuming approval from governmental authorities, I would be thinking geese or ducks, fish, shellfish, seaweeds. Biomass from algae or grasses? Also tidal hydro-electric.

    By enhancing the edge (adding more clumps of grasses, or cutting channels through denser areas) you could enhance productivity even further. If you approach local authorities, you could sell it is as a regenerative system providing environmental benefits.

    This vid shows an inspiring system:
    [video]https://blog.ted.com/2010/03/10/how_i_fell_in_l/[/video]
     
  10. purecajn

    purecajn Junior Member

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    Great video Yukkuri
     

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