Salt from olives

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Ramon, Aug 15, 2006.

  1. Ramon

    Ramon Junior Member

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    Hi,
    I am preparing some olives, and our recipie involves soaking them in salt water with regular changes. I was wondering if anyone has some suggestions for what I can do with the salt water since we have a septic & grey water system, and although I haven't got around to intensively planting the runoff area, I don't want to ruin it before I even start.
    Thanks
     
  2. FREE Permaculture

    FREE Permaculture Junior Member

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    If it's a problem to dispose of salty water then don't use it.
    You just use fresh water for a month or so, it does take longer but there really ain't much difference appart from wasting salt.

    I did a small batch with salt and the rest in water, the salted ones were too salty and i had to soak again in fresh water anyways.
    there was no difference in quality and it took about 2 weeks longer.
    it's been ages since the olives were picked, your's must be really ripe :)

    so long as the olives are completely submerged in water, your set.
     
  3. Ramon

    Ramon Junior Member

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    Hi Chickadee,
    Thanks, I had assumed that the salt was to help prevent contamination. I'm new to olives, but know about preserving other things, so assumed olives need salt for the same reasons as boiling bottles, etc.
     
  4. FREE Permaculture

    FREE Permaculture Junior Member

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    ah yeah, but your not preserving them at this point, your leaching the bitterness out aren't you? :)
    the final stage, when you put the olives in a jar to store and eat, you make a brine, like boil water with salt, clean the jars, then fill with olives then the brine, that's the preserving stage.

    you can use the salty water curing method if you like for a quicker result, but you mentioned you had concerns with salty water, so that's how you avoid it with just water curing.
     
  5. bella

    bella Junior Member

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    This is an interesting topic. Can anyone point me to a good resource on preserving olives? Actually, I'd love to know what else can be done with olives - olive oil, olive leaf extract, olives preserved in brine....?
     
  6. FREE Permaculture

    FREE Permaculture Junior Member

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    Hi Bella :)

    curing and preserving olives is relatively easy, finding a site with clear info is not.
    in my street there are 3 other olive heads and all three swear by a different method, so i reckon it's a matter of choice in which way you choose to cure and preserve.

    The italian lady does it in salty water, the greek guy does it in water alone and the lebanese bloke does it in just coarse salt.
    it also depends on how you like olives, the lebo likes his a bit sour and crunchy so he cures them in 4 days, the italian lady marinates in olive oil and the flavour is quite intense, and the greek guy cures my way but doesn't marinate them like i do at the end with all sorts of things like chilli and oregano.

    I'm sticking with my method now as when i started looking up olives, i was so confused with all the different views.
    i have added my bookmarked olive sites for you look through and make you own mind up.

    anyways, so you have your table olives, you can make like an olive tapenade i think it's called, minced up, it's great for adding to soups or sauces or spread on crusty bread or pizzas, a little garlic goes good with that too.

    you can also pit them and stuff them with capsicum or chilli or cheese.

    [​IMG]

    Olive oil is great but you really need a lot of olive trees, like 20 to get any decent ammount of oil, but more like 50 to tie you over for a year if you use olive oil in most of your cooking.

    Just imagine making a fresh loaf of olive bread, cutting into sticks and dipping into your own home made olive oil with some good cheese and a bottle of red :)

    you'd want to be sure you grow the type of olive you like, like kalamata end up the nice big fat pointy black ones but are one of few that don't get picked for green olives, a green olive is an unripe olive but most other olive trees can be picked green or black.
    for oil they alll need to be fully ripe, but for table you can pick the whole tree when it's like half and half and process them seperately.

    anyways, i too would like to know what else can be done with them so i hope there's more olive growers here to share.

    here's them sites, the 2nd one is olives australia and has virtually everything you need to know in the links section..

    https://www.emeraldworld.net/curing.html

    https://www.oliveaustralia.com.au/Pickling_your_Olives/pickling_your_olives.html

    https://greekfood.about.com/od/greekcookingtips/qt/cureolives.htm

    https://www.albury.net.au/~jweemaes/gopage3.html

    https://www.abc.net.au/wa/stories/s1371581.htm

    https://www.cs.sun.ac.za/~rdodds/Olives/indeks.html

    https://www.australianolives.com.au
     
  7. Peter Clements

    Peter Clements Junior Member

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    Spring Water

    I know a bloke who preserves olives for his commercial marinades- he buys 20litre bottles of mineral spring water from his local supermarket to soak them- its' cheaper than buying it direct from the source itself!
     
  8. Ramon

    Ramon Junior Member

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    I've decided to switch to plain water, but out of interest, is there a way to get rid of salt without damaging the soil? Does anyone know about how much salt (say in kilograms) can be tolerated by soil(square meters).
     
  9. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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    Chickadee's Olive Primer Post

    Great post Chickadee! Thanks for pulling together all that information!

    9anda1f
     
  10. bella

    bella Junior Member

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    Wow, Chickadee, what a LOT of info. I didn't go through the links yet, but wanted to thank you for your reply. I ask because I'm looking at a property with 2 paddocks of young olive trees. :) I don't know anything specific about them yet.

    Ramon, can you pour the salty water onto a driveway or path or similar where it won't easily run off into another area? Great weed suppressing qualities, salt. Hope you find a solution to that one.

    I'm off to check out those links.
    Thanks again.
     
  11. FREE Permaculture

    FREE Permaculture Junior Member

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    hey no prob's, yeah i know i've out done myself :)
    just imagine if I knew what i was talking about?
    scary really :lol:

    two paddocks of olives? now that's handy.
    it's getting quite competitive the olive and oil market these days
    but even if you ddn't want to get into processing them all, then maybe you could just sell them like raw.

    I noticed in my area, every year there's a few places that the grape guys set up and sell there grapes to backyard wine makers by the box.
    got talking to a few and they told me that aswell as grapes, a lot of there customers were also into olives.
    and if they knew years ago, they would of planted more olives instead of mostly grapes.
    so you could find one of these places, usually there vacant blocks of land these people set up for a month or so during grape season, you could hire a spot there and sell boxes of olives.
    also if you have any other produce at the time you could bring that up too.

    they just sell them in those polystyrene boxes, so you could collect them boxes at fruit shops over the year for free and you'd be set.
    anyways, good luck and let us know if you go ahead with it and what your gonna do.
     
  12. Ramon

    Ramon Junior Member

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    Thanks bella for steering me in the right direction.
    I'm planning to put strawberries down the middle of the driveway, but I have a deck under which nothing grows (although I might put some geese under there sometime) so that's where I'd put it(swapped to plain water at the moment, but I know for the future).
     
  13. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Re: Salt from olives

    Perhaps you could make a little Solar Still and evaporate off the water leaving the salt for re-use?

    I used a great receipie of Don Dunstan's for preserving Olives in Red Wine.
    It was very easy and delicious. Much tastier and easier than using salt.
    The book might be still about in libraries or second-hand bookshops -
    or someone here might have a copy?
     

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