Rubbish Dumps, Councils and the lack-of recycling systems!

Discussion in 'Designing, building, making and powering your life' started by caldera, Sep 5, 2007.

  1. caldera

    caldera Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2006
    Messages:
    70
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Okay, so in Kyogle shire we don't have a pick-up recycling program ... which means very few people recycle

    you have to take it out to the tip and they don't recycle any plastic, just paper/cardboard and Glass and Aluminum cans

    I wonder how many councils in Australia still don't have recycling bins and pick-ups ?

    this should be common practice, all the children should learn about recycling and how its the basis of sustainability in the most biologically diverse eco-systems on earth (rainforests)

    everything is cycled around and around... ZERO WASTE

    ultimately everything in our society should be recycled if we want to live in a sustainable earth-friendly way

    ... and so i was taking a load out last week, when i saw in the metal pile some really nice looking chicken wire !

    i thought, wow that's perfect for my new chicken coup... i took 2 steps towards it and the rubbish dump man yelled at me "no scavenging, the boss came in last week and said scavenging isn't allowed"


    :shock:

    is this common practice?

    i know they melt it all down and make scrap metal out of it... but there is so much energy used to do this ... wouldn't it be better if someone could make use of it in it's second-hand form

    my hope is that kyogle council is "one-of-a-kind" and we have much to learn in this quiet country town

    thoughts ?
     
  2. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

    Joined:
    May 14, 2004
    Messages:
    3,464
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    g'day calcera,

    when we lived in rural qld our dump recycled almost nothing the manager didn't even have a section where he could sell/give away usable items, like lots of other dumps have. so i would suggest many rural tips don't do much if any recycling, oh not forget rubbish collected from those rural 'urban developments all ended up in this same tip.

    not so sure that recycling metals, glass especially polimers is any better than making it new in teh first place could be more pollution created in the recycle process.

    our society needs to look at reusable containers, ok they still need washing and transportation to factory for re-use but what realy is the lessor of 2 or more evils??? might be better to develop containers that can be composted on peoples gardens???

    len
     
  3. teela

    teela Junior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2005
    Messages:
    185
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    We don't have recycling pick up here. We store the stuff here till it gets too much of a mess then take it in to our local depot. Once there the bloke who runs the joint grizzles and whinges "this aint worth nuthin to me" or "why do you bother to save this/these?" grumble grumble..........prick! blaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa makes me wonder why I bother at all.

    In another episode here we saw a few nice rolls of rack wire (it's like a strong type of chicken wire, the stuff is like gold to anyone with animals cause it makes very good fences) it was piled up on top of a rubbish heap. Before we could get around to tracing the owner and asking if we could have/buy the stuff it had all been set alight and burnt. Now the wire is no good to anyone. What a waste! Makes ya sick sometimes how people waste, and don't really care.
     
  4. Muddy

    Muddy Junior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2007
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    We have no recycling here either.
    The best solution is to work toward a situation where we don't have anything to take to the tip. Far better to solve this problem in your own backyard than make it someone elses problem.
     
  5. eric_wa

    eric_wa Junior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2007
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hello,

    We don't have curb side pick up here either. We also have to store until it's an eye sore. They do recycle at the "transfer station", I live on an Island. One thing the Island is trying to start up is, Trash to Treasure. That is where reusable items are set aside for resale. The current facility is not large enough for this new operation. When they talk about starting it up at a different location, you get the same thing, Not In My Neighborhood.

    Hope they work it out
    Eric
     
  6. Nick Ritar

    Nick Ritar Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2007
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Hard rubbish

    We are building our first home and are trying to scrounge everything we can. Unfortunately our local council doesn't provide a hard rubbish collection service, so most locals dump everything at the tip. When there is an official hard rubbish collection the contractors almost always make their profit by selling the recycled goods they collect (and there is also the opportunity for a little unofficial collection by members of the public :wink:)

    There is a small shop at our tip that sells things that are scavenged, but it has very limited space and they only collect small high value household items like crockery, electronics, toys etc. I have not been able to get an answer about what happens to all the building materials and the like.

    Shell Harbour tip (just north of Kiama) has a much better recycling shop, with lots of outdoor space for building materials. I have managed to get $10 bath tubs, $2 grass catchers from mowers (make great chook nesting boxs) heaps of shelving, gates etc etc.

    Maybe a letter to the local paper is in order.
     
  7. ecodharmamark

    ecodharmamark Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2005
    Messages:
    2,922
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hello All :)

    The City of Greater Bendigo (CoGB) (Victoria, Australia) has collected (most) recyclable materials for quite some time. A lot of these 'treasures' are sold back to the community (at very reasonable prices) through the 'tip shop'. The CoGB also provides a toxic waste deposit facility enabling people to dispose of used engine oils, etc. in a environmentally responsible manner. Very soon the CoGB will be introducing a green waste collection service. This will effectively provide householders with a three-bin system - non-recyclables, recyclables and green waste. The need to introduce the green waste collection service was identified during a recent study which found that up to 70% of all household rubbish being placed in the non-recyclable bins was green waste.

    In a perfect world it would be great to see people consuming less and therefore disposing of less 'waste'. Further it would be great to see more people converting their green waste into compost/mulch for reuse on their own gardens - but we do not live in a perfect world.

    The CoGB is proactive with regards to waste matters and strongly encourages people to recycle, compost and dispose of toxic materials in a safe manner, etc. through various community-based education initiatives.

    There is still much the CoGB can achieve with regards to creating a more sustainable, less waste-orientated environment, and many people within this city are working hard at doing just this. Not happy with the waste industry in your local government area? Well then, why not do something about it? Contact your local council representatives/officers and ask how you can go about helping to achieve a zero waste policy in your community.

    Cheerio, Mark.
     
  8. Ojo

    Ojo Junior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2007
    Messages:
    490
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If all 65 billion pounds of manure that are created yearly in California underwent methane digestion, the fertility and productivity of farm soils would be greatly enhanced, while supplying an estimated 200+ megawatts of power. Digester technology could also significantly reduce the pathogens in dairy waste and help prevent polluted runoff. Additionally, methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, would be destroyed and air pollution from dairy liquids substantially mitigated.
    excerpt
    https://www.suscon.org/dairies/methanedigesters.asp

    These brief excerpts from Ram Bux Singh's books should make it obvious that methane gas production from manure and vegetable waste is no armchair visionary's dream. It's being done right now and over 2,600 gobar plants are currently operating in India alone.

    Here, in the U.S. our more than four hundred million cattle, pigs and chickens produce over two billion tons of manure a year... enough to spread four feet deep over an area of five hundred square miles! This valuable natural resource can be used to generate both combustible gas -- thus relieving part of our reliance on fossil fuels -- and a fertilizer richer in nitrogen than raw manure.

    Instead of contributing mightily to our water pollution crisis as feedlot runoff, this bountiful end-product of animal life could be turned to our advantage... as an economical and ecologically-sound power source!

    These instructions are for an underground, single-stage, double-chamber plant designed to digest 100 pounds of manure every 24 hours -- five cows' worth -- but may be scaled upward to construct a plant capable of producing 500 feet of gas a day).
    excerpts
    https://www.green-trust.org/2000/biofuel/methane.htm
    https://biorealis.com/digester/digestion.html
    https://www.kqed.org/quest/television/view/415
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UuRP0fpyIh4
    https://www.effectivemicro-organisms.co.uk/
    Eligibility quiz
    How Can Potential Grantees Apply for an SGP Grant?
    https://sgp.undp.org/index.cfm?module=Ac ... bilityQuiz
     

Share This Page

-->