Rocket stoves in the rough?

Discussion in 'Designing, building, making and powering your life' started by Tricky Widget, Mar 4, 2012.

  1. Tricky Widget

    Tricky Widget New Member

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    I'm fascinated by the design of the rocket stove and its simple-yet-amazing ability to dramatically increase the yield of heat from wood while conversely decreasing pollution. But the stoves I've seen require at least some amount of manufactured materials, which makes them difficult or impossible to create in the wild. So I'm wondering if there's some way to make a crude but effective rocket stove using only materials you'd be likely to find most places on earth, such as mud, stone, wood, and plant fiber. This clearly wouldn't be a long-term item, but something that could be made in a couple of hours that would last for a couple of weeks would be well worth the effort (especially if wood was scarce). But I'm a bit fuzzy on the specifics of how a rocket stove works, so I'm not sure how to approach the design. Does anyone have any thoughts? Thanks!
     
  2. mluthi69

    mluthi69 Junior Member

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  3. Terra

    Terra Moderator

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  4. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Mine is made from cob; A mixture of sand, straw and clay, 3 things readily available in the wild. It's very long term, and currently being carved up for a small smoker. ((zone 1 moving things around kinda thing))

    Please review : https://forums.permaculture.org.au/showthread.php?12402-Outdoor-Cob-Kitchen-Plans
     
  5. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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  6. Isaac Hill

    Isaac Hill Junior Member

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  7. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Mine needs straw because it is more then a cob rocket stove... mine is a smoker made of cob with a heated seat for sitting. Not some place to chill in this rainforest when food is smoking. :)
     
  8. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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    Another online resource to rocket stove/rocket mass heater information: https://www.permies.com/forums/f-55/stoves
    There are two experts on the subject who actively engage and answer questions posted within the forum there, Ernie and Erica Wisner.
     
  9. Pakanohida

    Pakanohida Junior Member

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    Hey Gandalf, if you ever come down here to Coos Bay area Oregon... you need to visit Cob Cottage across town from me. They specialize in cob homes and rocket mass heaters. In fact Ianto Evans who lives there wrote the book in the subject.

    Cob Cottage shares property with a Permaculture group residence called Mountain Homestead. Beautiful place, amazing people.
     
  10. 9anda1f

    9anda1f Administrator Staff Member

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    Thanks for the invite Pakanohida. Having met both Ernie and Erica, I would be honored to also meet Ianto (I've got his book).

    It appears we also have another common friend ... Kyle Chamberlin. We will be doing a consult with him to document edible plants of the local prairie end of April. He comes by my place from time to time for updates to the farm and idea exchanges.
     

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