Rock Dust - Sydney

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by Mungbeans, Jul 3, 2006.

  1. Mungbeans

    Mungbeans Junior Member

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    I have been reading a great book about attracting worms to your garden. The author highly recommends rock dust (finely ground granite/basalt/etc) as a soil conditioner, which he says the worms just love.

    The soil around my house is the usual sydney soil, very sandy and rather poor. I rang the local landscape supplies and the response was basically, 'What is that?'

    My brother knows an orchid nursery in Kangaroo Valley that stocks it. Do any of the Sydney locals know if it can be bought anywhere nearer?

    Leonie
     
  2. Sonya

    Sonya Junior Member

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    Hi Leonie,

    I've used rock dust in my garden and done some studies with Alanna Moore and some sustainable ag courses which all talked about the paramagnetic qualities of rock dust.

    Most landscape places don't know what it is and hence when you do find some it's really cheap! So don't tell them how good it is.

    Paramagnetic rock dust is mildy magnetic and it allows the soil to store and convert electromagnetic energy from the environment. Lightening creates an energy source - extremely low frequency radio waves - paramagnetic rocks receive this energy and store it and convert it into light. I've seen pics of a paramagnetic rock taken in total darkness and it showed a pinprick of light through the camera lens. Your plant roots use this light and it improves your soil.

    I don't know about worms and the rock dust, we add rock dust to our worm farms for digestive purposes, but rock dust will improve your soil generally.

    So, where do you get it? Just go to any large landscape place and take a really strong magnet with you. I found mine called 'crusher dust' (in Qld). I just used the magnet to test it, when you find it it will be very attracted to the magnet. You can also get rocks - they are called pitching rock up here.

    Good luck,

    Sonya
     
  3. PRAWN

    PRAWN Junior Member

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    Re: Rock Dust - Sydney

    I'm having a similar problem. I live in South Western Sydney and I can't find it anywhere...I'll keep you in mind when I do find it.
    Prawn over and out
     
  4. aroideana

    aroideana Junior Member

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    Re: Rock Dust - Sydney

    One product made up here just past Innisfail , cheap but not widely available , MinPlus ..
    also gogle Fishers Creek Rock Dust , for an amazing article on how it helped a large winery improve taste and helped crop survive better .
    Another brand I have heard good things about is Neomin ?
     
  5. gbell

    gbell Junior Member

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    Re: Rock Dust - Sydney

    One strategy might be to go to commercial suppliers and ask if they have local retailers (since shipping to individuals is probably prohibitively expensive).

    One product is "Super Natural Mineral Fertiliser" from a company called IOMAT:
    https://www.iomat.com.au/page3.htm

    Its basalt and granite rock dusts plus some other stuff. I know its frustrating to know there's an input as cheap and effective as rock dust, but have to purchase a processed form. Its mix of dusts might be a strength over quarry dust, since when you go to a quarry you're probably only going to get one kind (not a geologist, maybe someone will correct me).

    The other idea is to make a holiday out of your "rock dust run". For example, Hastings Valley Haulage here in Wauchope (near Port Macquarie, NSW) sells "crusher dust". Hire a trailer if you need a lot, drive up, have a weekend, haul some back to the concrete jungle.

    Just some ideas...

    By the way, paramagnetism is a real phenomenon (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paramagnetism) but I'm having a hard time finding any evidence (ie. controlled, repeatable experiments) that shows paramagnetism actually has any effect on the plants. So rock dust's wonderful effects are probably due solely to the minerals its supplying, especially to our tired Australian soils.

    Cheers,
    Greg
     
  6. MrWiggly

    MrWiggly New Member

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    I think paramagnetism really does help plant growth because I noticed that since using "critical elements" volcanic rock dust on my garden in Perth WA, the plants grow amazingly fast during the night of an electrical storm. It is as if the soil microbes are able to draw atmospheric static via the rock dust and transfer it to the plants. No-joke I have seen corn and sunflower plants grow 10 to 20cm in one night of rain and lightning (rain of course helps too). Critical elements contains a blend of granite, basalt and diorite. Diorite is supposed to be the most paramagnetic igneous rock. Oh yeah and our worms farms go absolutely nuts on rock dust, it greatly improves the quality of juice and castings (worms use the grit as gizzard 'teeth' and in doing so activate the rock minerals - dissolving and organically binding them). Worm poo made with vegie scraps and rock dust has to be one of the best fertilisers available!!! Rock dust is heavy so is best sourced locally. As long as its Ag approved its all good stuff and the more different rocks the better - for Perth residents try www.criticalelements.com.au
    NATURE ROCKS! HAPPY GARDENING!
     
  7. lil_clair

    lil_clair Junior Member

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    is this original post from 06!?

    i noticed that the Diggers club sell small 2kg bags of rock dust in their catalogue for $35
     
  8. adrians

    adrians Junior Member

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    ask for crusher dust. Try to establish which quary it came from, get the stuff from a basalt quarry, granite second, and not from crushed concrete.
    It should be less than $30 for a quarter of a cubic metre (which is around 300kg - you will need a trailer or get it delivered)

    it is used for things including making pads for placing water tanks. I think it is much coarser than the stuff sold as "rock dust" but it defnitely contains the same stuff, just also with some coarse material in it. I would be VERY suprised if you hadn't found someone with crusher dust, by the third landscape place you called.
     
  9. Fernando Pessoa

    Fernando Pessoa Junior Member

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    It's robbing peter to pay paul,but it does get results.
    Best wishes
    fernando
     
  10. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    The dust we use is a by product of the railway ballast industry and the dust left after the crushing is sold as fill dust. But Boral have now realized the value of the paramagnetic varieties and are charging much more. It is still cheap enough for what it achieves.
     
  11. eco4560

    eco4560 New Member

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    Someone at the Garden Expo today (well actually Sonya Wallace) was talking about Natrimin. Is it really any better than crusher dust? Particularly given that I get a 15 L bucket of crusher dust for $2 and the Natrimin appeared to be about $2.50 for a 500 g ziplock bag....
     
  12. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    natramin sounds like a catchy name a little like alrock that markets crusher dust to unwary but I am not totally sure. there are better and worse crusher dusts but all will add minerals.
    We need to be aware of where and how these things are derived and look for some byproduct that is local.
     
  13. Gardening guru

    Gardening guru New Member

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    Hi guys,

    I just brought rockdust from a company in victoria called munash. I believe they are stocked in alot of nurseries there webpage has a list, www.rockdust.com.au

    Happy gardening
     

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