RICE KNIVES - Where in the World can you buy them from?

Discussion in 'Buy, sell, trade, give away & exchange' started by Nick Huggins GC Qld, Nov 28, 2011.

  1. Nick Huggins GC Qld

    Nick Huggins GC Qld Junior Member

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  2. matto

    matto Junior Member

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  3. purecajn

    purecajn Junior Member

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    Try 2nd hand shops and antique shops. Old tools tend to wind up as decorations. Last month I found a Sickle for $10 and a name brand Craftsman Scythe for $30. The Kama can be made buy purchasing a quality Drywall Tape Knife\Putty Knife. Next take a perminant marker and draw your new blade shape on its blade. Then simply cut-n-file off the undesirable pieces. The width of the Puddy Knife blade allows for whatever angle you want so the wider the blade the more angle you can have. Just stay outside the lines and your gold.
     
  4. barefootrim

    barefootrim Junior Member

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    Rice Knifes,

    yep rice knifes are around, there is one on the Russian flag called a Sickle, In the British Isles they are called a Bill Hook ( a variation ) , in Asia they use them to harvest Rice stalks, basically it is a curved blade, anything from 3 inches to 12 inches long maybe, there is a grander version called a scythe that is maybe 3 feet long, the Hungarians use one about 6 feet long,,, but its all the same thing, a curved blade to cut vegetation. Some good ones have a sharp blade and a small seration on the backhand side for those hard to get branches.

    I have for sale a "Eco chop and drop permie knife" but it is 120 dollars dearer than the normal hardware variety of about 20 bucks for a bill hook.

    All the best
     
  5. aroideana

    aroideana Junior Member

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    Very pleased with service from forestrytools.com.au
     
  6. matto

    matto Junior Member

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    Thanks a heap for that link, aroideana. Makes me want to get a spade and plant some trees!
     
  7. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    Stainless Steel Watering Can - $350.

    TAKE ALL MY MONEY.
     
  8. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    i got mine from home hardware

    i think it ws only about 12$ good blade but sht handle ,
    i welded on a steel one, bit slippery
    great tool faster than wipper snipper
     
  9. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    I got a Karma for xmas it came from green harvest i think the handle is powlonia?
    it goes really well
     
  10. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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    didn't I see you on you tube once with a bush knife Andrew - paste a link to that!!
     
  11. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    cant paste
    but
    if you search for bill hook new england permaculture you should find it
     
  12. purplepear

    purplepear Junior Member

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  13. S.O.P

    S.O.P Moderator

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    I couldn't watch that video with sound but how does that compete with a handsaw, or something like a detachable system from handle to pole? For chop and drop only?
     
  14. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    can't find much about them in australia and even less in qld, so are they available over here?

    len
     
  15. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    i got my bill hook at the channon markets ( those old blokes who sell old tools always have them) it felt really great carting it around the crowd
    our democracy is based on the bill hook and the pitchfork: just look at any of the paintings of the French revolution
     
  16. Speedy

    Speedy Junior Member

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    If you know anyone heading to Bali , ask them to grab you an Arit.
    its a sickle like tool with very sharp edge (not serrated like many European sickles)
    and the blade is larger and set at a different angle to that of a Kama.

    I've used them for around 20yrs and feel that they're the perfect tool for sub-tropical and tropical gardening.
    with proper mantainence the blade edge seems to get better over time.
    keeping them sharp is they key.

    there are different types and they're mostly handmade by village bladesmiths.

    there is also a clurit and caluk.

    the caluk is sort of like a mini brush hook or fern hook.

    lighter than a billhook, but I've used them for tasks as varied as trimming hedges,
    cutting thick branches ( depending on tree species and not for the beginner as it's easy to damage the blade) ,
    to taking out trunks within a clump of Golden Cane Palm .
    they're also the best tool by far for trimming and tidying up dwarf date palms

    I always drill a small hole through the ferrule and tang then epoxy and pin the tang with a small piece of brass rod or bronze brazing wire for a 100% sure hold in the handle.
    If not, the handle can sometimes let go of the blade mid swing 8-O


    then if youre into jungle gardening, a Parang or a Golok are great tools.
    basically a very sharp heavy bladed long knife.
    a heavier less flexible blade than a machete ,
    but better suited to woodier plant material, like that encountered in Aust. and SE Asia.
    again, keeping it sharp and not abusing it is the key to best results.

    sorry bout the poor qlty pic, but here are 2 Arit and a Caluk (right)
    the sharpening steel (for scale ) measures approx 45cm long
    [​IMG]

    and here are two styles of Parang (top and middle) and a Golok (below)
    [​IMG]
     
  17. daniallawton

    daniallawton Junior Member

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  18. andrew curr

    andrew curr Moderator

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    that was a Bill hook
     

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