raising the water table

Discussion in 'Members' Systems' started by sleptember, Sep 27, 2012.

  1. sleptember

    sleptember Junior Member

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    I'm in a part of Africa that has a five month rainy season. Drought is an issue for most of the year.

    I've become intrigued with the idea of improving the availability of groundwater to trees and plants as a year-round irrigation technique.

    I'd like some information on how I can raise the water table on 2 acres of fairly flat land (the property is actually bigger than this but the rest is forest I want to leave untouched). It would be fantastic if you could point me to resources that deal with this topic in depth.

    How can you advise me? What are some of your tips?
     
  2. Ludi

    Ludi Junior Member

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  3. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Are you sure this is a good idea?
    Cutting down all trees helps
    How will you deal with salinity?
    https://www.agric.wa.gov.au/PC_93695.html
    What do you want to achieve?
     
  4. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    g'day slept'

    dunno that we can influence the sub aquafa? that is fed from someplace mostly unknown and if in that area the forest is degraded of large trees then that could affect any rain water actually getting into the aquafa. by all means preserve your trees.

    being flat the copy book swale may not do much plus it takes some effort to instal and takes up room in the landscape, but less imposing is using a single rip on the back of a tractor to around 18"s or so this way at least water can get into you sub soil which we found can give benefits like a higher water table, it is a way to get water into the soil and store it there for some period. guess you will be mulching heavily?

    len
     
  5. sleptember

    sleptember Junior Member

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    Thanks for the feedback all. It's given me a lot to research and read.

    Great idea!
     
  6. matto

    matto Junior Member

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    If you can get your hands on Peter Andrews book, Back from the Brink, it will give you a perspective of landscape reading that will help you recognise recharge areas in your landscape.

    Not provided in the book is ways to slow water from leaving drainage channels in your property. Look for a book called Let the Water Do the Work by Bill Zeedyk, and also Brad Lancaster's books. You could actually begin this higher in the landscape if thats where your forests are by facines, brush check dams and anything else that slows the water and sinks it into the soil.

    A new guy in the game is Cam Wilson at www.earthintegral.com
     

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