quail

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by bigboof12, Nov 16, 2006.

  1. bigboof12

    bigboof12 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    in another forum i was adviced to look at quail as my parents wont let me get chickens, does anybody have any advice, could i place them in a chicken coup over my garden and rotate it as a chicken tractor, would they still dig the earth well enough, also i hear the are insectavorios, are they totalyinsect eaters or can be be fed of grain aswell and if not, will i have to feed them or are they likly to catch enough incects themselves?
     
  2. ho-hum

    ho-hum New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2005
    Messages:
    1,590
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Boof,

    Quail like chooks are insectivores and grain eaters. They are probably too light to really 'tractor' anything. Most quail are just too small to uproot grasses etc.

    They do well in an aviary as stubble quail - common quail are gentle souls who will pretty much live off what other birds drop onto the floor.

    Quail are edible and lay well. The baby quail are like cotton balls and cute.

    mike
     
  3. bigboof12

    bigboof12 Junior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    ok so if i put them in the avairy i intend to get, they can live of the seed at is dropped and any insects they can catch, but but their not big enough to turn soil on the garden, fair point, how bout their eggs, are they good eating? how many eggs do u need reach the equivelent of 2 chook eggs
    thanx
     
  4. mini moose

    mini moose Guest

    Hi,
    I'm looking for similar info. I heard that Quail don't raise their own chicks and they have to be incubated. Is this always the case? Does any one know if they can be incubated the same as chickens?

    What breeds are for eating? I've heard of Japanese Quail, King Quail and Japonica Quail. Are they all eating breeds?

    I just thought they might be a good meat source for a change. Something I could handle doing myself.
     
  5. SueinWA

    SueinWA Junior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2005
    Messages:
    1,251
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    It would take ten to twelve quail eggs to equal two chicken eggs, but the percentage of yolk is somewhat higher. The eggs are speckled, and about the size of a very large olive, and thin-shelled (handle carefully).

    The largest variety is the Japanese Quail. The tiny button quail are very small, the chicks are the size of bumblebees.

    I've read that most people incubate the eggs, but there are several families of quail around me that are wild, and they raise their own young. I usually see 10-15 chicks, which are cared for by both parents. The chicks are extremely small, so you'll need fine mesh (1/4"/6mm) to contain them.

    Here is some info on quail farming: https://www.vethelplineindia.com/art_quails.htm

    Sue, who would rather be late for work than scare the quail
     
  6. GaryOrtlieb

    GaryOrtlieb New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2007
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Quail are not likely to hatch their own eggs in captivity. They will have to be incubated. They are not like chickens.

    The best way to incubate them is in a fan forced air, self turning incubator. The egg shells are very delicate and should be handled with care and as little as possible. They have a protective natural coating on them. This needs to stay in tact or the egg isn't any good.

    The Coturnix quail (Japanese quail) is a great breed to start out with, they adapt well to a captive surrounding. They are best raised in coops on wire.

    They also require a special diet at different stages of their life. The Coturnix quail reaches maturity quicker than any other quail. They will hatch in an incubator in about 17 days and can be taken out of a brooder in about 4 weeks. Then even if you want to put them in a flight pen, they should be moved from the brooding area to wire bottom coops for several weeks. This way it gives them time to develop their immune system.

    Raising quail can be a fun hobby or can be done for profit. But it is nothing like rasing chickens. It will require some research and knowledge to be successful.

    Hope this helps in some way.
     
  7. bill

    bill Junior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2007
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    quails

    in answer to a question about breeding quails - my dad showed me the trick when i was a kid. grow a really thick patch of kikuyu grass in your run. the quails will make tunnels in it. after a while the female dissappears and (hey presto) a couple of weeks later you have furry little chicks the size of apricot pips running about. it was dead easy.
     
  8. han_ysic

    han_ysic Junior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2006
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Re: quail

    I agree quails will not dig up the ground, but can be used to mow and fertilise the lawn, or in the bottom of an aviary. From talking to those who have them here (I was considering some, but ended up going for guinea pigs instead, as they were free and needed rehoming)
    King Quails are what you will source reasonably easily in Australia, although your side might be different. There is a growing market for the eggs and meat. Eggs are generally eaten boiled or fried rather than used in cooking and the flavour is really great.
    I am using the guinea pigs as precomposting, breaking down veges and turning into lovely rich manure, combined with the grass they don't eat and the shredded paper I recycle for friends, it's perfect for composting. Plus they are pretty cute, and even purr when they are patted. I have them on a raised cage, rather than on the ground, as we don't have any grass, except the nature strip, and it's easier to clean the cage that way.
    Just my two cents.
    Hannah
     
  9. hedwig

    hedwig Junior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2005
    Messages:
    680
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I never heared about quails until I saw eggs sold in a chinese shiop. The shopkeeper said the're something very special.
     
  10. sammiiz

    sammiiz Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2007
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I have kept King Quails on the floor of our avairies for years, and i love them... I am looking at moving into other breeds, btu for now its just the kingies.

    Re: eggs
    Our quail hens lay quite a lot, and you would need it to use the eggs for eating purposes, as they are very small (as someone said, a largish olive), but are reportedly quite flavoursome. We don't use the eggs as we have chooks as well.

    Re: meat
    The King Quails that i have, are generally a bit small, you can't get much meat off them if you've just got them in the bottom of the avairy, but they can be run sperately and fed for fattening etc and then the meat is excellent and tasty.

    Re: breeding...
    Whats this about incubating them??
    My Quails breed very happily in the bottom of our avairy. The little chicks are the tiniest cutest things you've ever seen, and being so small you have to watch out for even the smallest holes and be careful of water sources so as to avoid drowning. But the certainly do not require incubation here, apart from puttin gout a bit of food for the mum and a few extra worms from the worm farm to supplement their diet, i dont do anything at all and they will hatch out a good four to six little chicks all buy themselves.

    Re: tractoring
    Perhaps the larger breeds may be better, but i would say they are all a bit smal to be used for this purpose... even smaller than a bantam chook, and bant's dont do much either.
    They do still fertilise and keep pests down so from that aspect they are good.

    My thoughts.
    Cheers.
     

Share This Page

-->