Prime Permaculture Property for sale on Sunshine Coast Hinterland, QLD

Discussion in 'Buy, sell, trade, give away & exchange' started by MikeS, Apr 23, 2013.

  1. MikeS

    MikeS Junior Member

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    After ten years of hard work, blood sweat and tears, we have decided to move to Tasmania for the cold climate. I just can't put the hours needed into this place in Summer, I'm just not a tropical kind of bloke!

    So if you enjoy Sub Tropical life just half an hour from Noosa's beaches and want to live sustainably, check out our Award winning house that has now been visited by hundreds of people looking to learn how it's all done....

    All information available at
    https://damnthematrix.wordpress.com/2013/04/19/mon-abri-for-sale/
     
  2. aneurine

    aneurine Junior Member

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    How magical, I would've loved your property - my mum grew up on a 160acre farm not far from there in Cooroy and we holidayed in Noosaville and visited her old place just at Christmas. It is an amazing area, and I am into beekeeping too. But alas, we've just bought a property in Berry here in NSW. QLD was always an issue re my hubby's work. Shame!!! Hope you find the right buyer!
     
  3. ecodharmamark

    ecodharmamark Junior Member

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    Excellent site! Planned, designed and developed with a genuine understanding of sustainable living. The fact you have access to a rail service is the icing on the cake! If we were looking to move to QLD, we'd certainly be having a second look. Regarding your ad/webpage: may I offer you some constructive criticism? Overall, it reads very well. I especially like how you have presented your location - and the services near to you - in a hierarchal manner. As you say, the most important thing in the overall planning/design process is getting the location right. One thing you might want to add in the 'block' section, is a bit about the 'neighbourhood context'. You mention that the site was formally a 120-acre dairy, and that it was subsequently subdivided. But you fail to mention anything about the size/number of neighbouring allotments. Of course, a Google search will show the above, but what it can't do is accurately describe the demeanour/land use of your neighbours (apart from the shop owners/operators). After all, a study of one's intended location, should always include an analysis of the socio-cultural makeup of the site within its local/bioregional context. Once gain, great job, hope it sells, and I look forward to following your journey down to Tassie (should you care to share particulars of it here, at the PRI Forum).
     
  4. PermaGuinea

    PermaGuinea Junior Member

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    Hi, Mike. You probably don't know me but I've heard a lot (of good things) about you and your property from mutual bee-keeping friends. Sorry to hear that you will be giving up the opportunity for two growing seasons and moving south. I've heard if you move far enough south you don't have to worry about weeds at all - but who wants to live in Antarctica, eh? :D



    Since it is also somewhat relevant to our own situation, described here, I hope you won't mind if I take the liberty of answering ecodharmamark's questions myself. (For reference, our home is located midway between Cooran and Gympie.)

    Cooran is actually a bit of a permaculture hub. When we first moved here five years ago, we were aiming for Cooran firstly because some of the members of our Irish band live there and in Pomona, and partly because of the general eco-friendly nature of the town. There is a budding transition town movement there and there used to be an organic market in the park in the middle of town every other Saturday (this has since been discontinued and efforts to re-establish it have been stifled by insurance and other issues. :( )

    At the time, we ourselves couldn't find anything affordable and ended up a little closer to Gympie instead. Mike was lucky enough to get a block at a reasonable price before the boom and build it up from there.

    The region in general has two well-established permaculture groups, Permaculture Noosa, which meets on the third Thursday of each month in Memorial Hall, Maple St, Cooroy (20 mins SE from Cooran), and Gympie Permaculture information exchange, which meets on the first Monday of each month in the Gympie Regional Gallery workshop room, 39 Nash Street, Gympie (25 mins NW from Cooran).

    Both Gympie and Noosa have strong seed-saver groups. We share heritage seed that has been grown in the region, some of the varieties for over thirty years. Likewise the local information base draws on experiences of members who have grown vegies and fruit here organically, bio-dynamically, and/or permaculturally for two or three decades.

    Kin Kin (16 mins NNE from Cooran) also has a budding permaculture meeting at members houses once a month. Tom Kendall of the Permaculture Research Institute Sunshine Coast (https://permaculturesunshinecoast.org/) is Vice President of Permaculture Noosa and an active participant in all three groups. There is a lot of "cross-pollination" between these groups. :)

    There is a local "care farmers" market every Saturday afternoon from 4pm to 6pm at Dagun Station (16 mins due W from Cooran). (For those who aren't familiar with "care farming" it is basically organic farming without the certification.) Dagun station is also gradually turning into a cultural venue after the markets.

    We also share surplus produce at the permaculture meetings and there are plenty of opportunities to do so within the local community in Cooran as well. Rossco Craig from Northey Street Community Gardens in Brisbane is re-establishing himself on a vacant block behind Queen Street in Cooran and has teemed up with Tim Lang to start an new initiative whereby the owners of all of the adjacent houses have been invited to expand their gardens onto Rossco's block in a scenario reminiscent of the old village "common" of yore. (Older blocks in Cooran are notorious for their limited 800-sqm. size.)

    Rossco's parents Athol and Skaidra Craig and brother Glenbo are very active in the Gympie permaculture group and in Valley Bees - a group active in promoting awareness in the Mary Valley catchment area of the importance of native and honey bees in pollination, etc.

    For other organic produce and goods we can't produce ourselves, there are organic shops in Gympie, Pomona, Cooroy, and Noosa. Cooroy IGA also has a range of organic cosmetics and foods.

    For musicians, Cooran also has an open-mike acoustic night in Cooran Hall on King Street (right next to the general store on the main street) every six weeks. There is also an open-mike event based in Brooloo (30 mins SW from Cooran) that occasionally uses Dagun Station as a venue.

    We ourselves host an Irish session on the fourth Sunday of every month in the Gympie Regional Gallery workshop room, 39 Nash Street, Gympie (same venue as the permaculture meetings) and our band plays at the Mountain Stop Café in Pomona (10 mins SE from Cooran), rotating with other bands every six weeks or so. There are also Irish sessions in Noosa.

    Why would anyone leave all this? Well, we won't be, we are hoping to move within the region and downsize our mortgage in the process. We are sorry to see people like Mike leaving and we wish him well wherever his journey may take him. More importantly, we hope the new owners will see the value of becoming a part of this vibrant community and hope to be working alongside them in the future.

    I hope that answers ecodharmamark's questions/suggestions for elaboration.

    Brendan
     
  5. MikeS

    MikeS Junior Member

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    Hi Brendan, thanks for the write up! It may come as a shock to you, but the people I know in Tasmania who do Permaculture there grow food all year 'round! I find it quite funny that when I tell people we're moving to Tassie they imagine it like moving to Sweden, when in fact Tasmania has a Mediterranean climate. To be sure you wouldn't pick a block with the aspect of ours in Tasmania, because anything facing South wouldn't see the light of day in Winter.... I've heard of Sth facing slopes covered in frost until 3PM..... BUT, pick a Nth facing slope, and you actually get a lot of sun, and therefore warmth, all year 'round. In the sub tropics, you can get away with nearly any aspect.

    Nth facing land is not easy to come by in Southern Tasmania where the topography tends to face S towards the sea, or East and West when near the Huon inlet, but they're there.....

    I'm sure whoever replaces us in Cooran will take up the mantra..... nobody's irreplaceable.....!
     
  6. PermaGuinea

    PermaGuinea Junior Member

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    Not sure what the "mantra" is that you are referring to[​IMG]All I know is that "permaculture" is not just about "organic gardening" - it is as much about the interconnectedness of people and ideas.

    We have a thirty-strong permaculture in Gympie (just in regular attendees) and there are thirty different interpretations of what permaculture is and how it works, each of which works in its own way and none of which is perfect for every situation. Its strength is in its diversity. Rather than "nobody is irreplaceable", I would say that everyone is unique and everyone has something to contribute.

    The community is here for those who appreciate it. We help each other, and the amazing thing about community is that you always get out more than what you put in.

    As for north-facing slopes, I am sure they are very important down in Tasmania. Up here, closer to the Tropic of Capricorn, we are in a sub-tropical climate where they can be useful but not essential. Our gentle south-facing slope is much more accessible and useful than a lot of steeper north-facing blocks. I know some north-facing slopes that only see direct sunlight from 10 am till 2 pm.

    Part of permaculture is learning to adapt and use what you have efficiently. There is no such thing as the "perfect block" and no one solution fits all.
     

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