powdery mildew and blackspot treatment

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by katrina, Dec 9, 2007.

  1. katrina

    katrina Junior Member

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    i came across a recipe for a treatment for these two problems and was wondering if anyone has used it, and to what effect?

    10g sheoak needles are boiled in 2l water for 20min, then the lot is added to a bucket of 8l water and stirred for 10 min. this is meant to be sprayed on affected areas throughout the humid season. as we have sheoaks in the backyard, this would be appealing to me , if it works.
    cheers, kat
     
  2. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    good recipe katrina,

    mind if we add that to our remedies page?

    all points to growing those plants that are suseptable in plenty of sunshine and breezy spots for planty of air circulation, plus good soil drainage all helps as well.

    len
     
  3. katrina

    katrina Junior Member

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    hi len, it's not my recipe, and i have no idea if it even works. i saw it on a noticeboard at one of my workplaces. but feel free to post it. i would love to know why it would work, if indeed it does, just coz i'm curious. and it's always great to see a recipe where all you have to do is go out and pick it from the ground in the backyard.
    kat
     
  4. gardenlen

    gardenlen Group for banned users

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    guess ther would be oils at least involved in the she oak leaves??

    but if we post it maybe we'll get feed back i can she oak leaves but then p/m and especially black spot aren't an issue with our garden.

    maybe you might consider posting my link at your workplace for your fellow workers?

    len
     
  5. Tas'

    Tas' Junior Member

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    So I'm wondering if a few drops of eucalyptus or tea tree oil would work just as well.
     
  6. hippi Miki

    hippi Miki New Member

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    Full cream milk

    I have had quite a bit of powdery mildue on my pumkins recently and am amazed by the effect of full cream milk! I mixed half milk half water in a spray bottle and covered the affected parts of the plant in it. The next day, when i looked at a pumkin runner that had been only mildly affected, i noticed the mildew had disappeared! After only 2 sprays it is nearly gone from all the plants; i am going to do once more and occasionally if it returns... The beauty of course is milk is natural :D and doesn't kill other insects (i dont think!?) and really easy to prepare. Apparently proteins in the milk cause the hairs on the mildew spores to shrivel up, so the spores die. I have used this on mildew that appears on snow peas and it seemed to have some effect, although not as much as on the pumpkins...
     
  7. IntensiveGardener

    IntensiveGardener Junior Member

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    horsetail

    I'v seen people use Bio Dynamic methods to control mildew with good effect. I was thinking of trying it on this years peas because they usually get it.
    They generally use preparations made from quarts rock (preparation 501) and/or from horsetail as a foliar spray.
    The idea i'm told is to help the plant take up silica - horsetail is 90% silica - so that it absorbs light more efficiently.
    Has anyone ever tried this?
     
  8. IntensiveGardener

    IntensiveGardener Junior Member

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    Well, I recently tried Milk on my snowpea crop and it worked wonders.
    My crop is in 2, 50m long beds, each with two rows of snowpeas about a foot apart. They are 1.5 - 2 meters tall and had just begun to get a little bit of both black spots and powdery mildew on the bottoms.
    As soon as i realised i sprayed the entire crop with 10 litres of milk (unhomogenized, Biodynamic) which was diluted with 50% water.
    That was about 3 weeks ago and the rows seem to have very minimal mildew now. They only follow-up spraying was on a few isolated patches which were badly effected.
    I think perhaps the sucess of this treatment depends on catching it early on.
    Just my experience,
    cheers,
    IG
     
  9. gbell

    gbell Junior Member

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    Good to hear everybody's success with milk spray.

    I'll add that most preparations recommend a 1:9 ratio of milk:water. According to Jerry Coleby-Williams, the danger of a stronger mix is that it may actually promote, rather than retard, mildew/mould growth.

    Also of interest is that spraying the milk solution in full sunlight will enhance the effect. From https://www.agwine.adelaide.edu.au/plant/crisp_2006.pdf

    Translation "Spray in sunlight and it'll work better" :)

    This same research also says that milk powder (mixed with water) works just as well.

    I have trouble getting the spray to wet the mould - maybe the leaves are too far gone at that point anyway.
     
  10. sweetpea

    sweetpea Junior Member

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    Wow, really interesting to hear about the milk. I have used baking soda mixed with water and a couple drops of horticultural oil in a spray bottle. It keeps the healthy leaves from getting powdery mildew, but doesn't reverse the damage the mildew has already done to leaves. I imagine you can use a little horticultural oil in the milk, but as miki said, using whole cream milk works, and has that kind of greasy stickum in it.

    I've never been able to stop blackspot, but are you guys saying milk stops blackspot as well?
     

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