Pomegranates

Discussion in 'Planting, growing, nurturing Plants' started by potters grove, Apr 8, 2009.

  1. potters grove

    potters grove Junior Member

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    My 3 year old pomegranate tree seems healthy and lush. It is flowering well, but is dropping all its flowers when they have finished without setting fruit.
    I live in Brisbane re climate.
    Does anyone have an answer?
    Cheers,
    potters grove
     
  2. Curtis

    Curtis Junior Member

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    Re: Pomegranates

    Has the tree produced fruit in the past?

    Normally after 2-3 years, they should. Do you have any others around that are fruiting? I am unfamiliar with Brisbane and the climate there, but here in the Nevada desert we have many Pomegranate trees thriving, with about 400 new ones just planted.
     
  3. gardenaholic

    gardenaholic Junior Member

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    Re: Pomegranates

    When should these be pruned. Can they grow from cuttings or are seeds the best. Has anyone any experience in propagating these.
     
  4. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Re: Pomegranates

    I know little of these except old ones are the most beautiful of trees especially when hanging with fruit
    have you tried one of the English permaculture Forums?
    They seem to be more popular in GB;
    although i have seen them popping up more and more in Oz restaurant desert menus.

    Dropping flowers and no fruiting in Citrus is a deficiency of P or K I don't remember which sorry. Probably K; have you been using an Oz native food/fertiliser on them?
     
  5. potters grove

    potters grove Junior Member

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    Re: Pomegranates

    :p Thank you for yor comments and advise Curtis. Brisbane is in a coastal sub-tropical zone of Australia. I imagine that Nevada would be relatively dry and hot.
    There is one tree across the road which looks to be about 7 or 8 years old and fruits well. Could it be that mine is too moist perhaps?
    Cheers,
    Potter's Grove
     
  6. potters grove

    potters grove Junior Member

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    Re: Pomegranates

    Gardenaholic.
    The correct time for pruning is in the coldest period of the year, and yes they do strike from cuttings.
    Much success, :p
    potter's grove
     
  7. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    Re: Pomegranates

    Some say that Pomegranates prefer slightly acid soil (pH 5.5-6.5).Others push that to 7
    What is the pH of yours?

    https://72.14.235.132/search?q=cache:Jsm ... clnk&gl=au
     
  8. potters grove

    potters grove Junior Member

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    Re: Pomegranates

    Thank you for your info Michaelangelica.
    Re PH level of soils I have usually dealt with that when I initially plant out and keep an eye on it over time.
    It could well be the insufficient moisture factor which may have been the cause.
    Cheers,

    Potter's Grove
     
  9. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    https://nccam.nih.gov/research/results/spotlight/120508.htm
    It is unusual for a food to be tested for "safety and eficacy' silly, very silly.
    So 10,000+ years of use aren't enough?

    My recently planted pomegranate seeds are starting to come up (Harvested from a fruit).
    They seem easy. They must be the prettiest food plant around.
    The fruit looks like a large Christmas tree ornament.
     
  10. bazman

    bazman Junior Member

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    I have a couple of trees here in Brissie, I find some years are just not that good for fruiting and a normal tree might just drop it's flowers, this years wet season meant no fruit but the last couple were great, just keep adding compost and mulching as normal and it should come right, if it's growing well with green leafs you should get good crops in drier seasons.
     
  11. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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