Plague of Stink Beetles. But Why?

Discussion in 'Breeding, Raising, Feeding and Caring for Animals' started by brad_kl, Jun 9, 2012.

  1. brad_kl

    brad_kl Junior Member

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    I have noticed for the last few years at certain times of the year we have a plague of stink beetles (well that's what i call them) on the fence and the hedges out the front of our unit.

    Now they aren't doing any harm and Permaculture has taught me to not ask "How do I get rid of them" but to ask "Why are they there is such high numbers?" and "What does that tell me about the local environment?"

    Here are some pictures:


    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]

    So does anyone have any ideas on my questions above?
     
  2. brad_kl

    brad_kl Junior Member

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    No one has any ideas about this?
     
  3. Michaelangelica

    Michaelangelica Junior Member

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    I have only seen "stink beetles" that are green with an orange dot;
    usually attacking citrus and they spit/spray you with something nasty when you touch them
    They look more like this
    [​IMG]
    https://www.brisbaneinsects.com/brisbane_stinkbugs/BronzeOrangeBugs.htm
    I have never seen your "striped'' beetles before
    Perhaps the first thing to do is ask your local museum/entomologist to get an accurate identification of them?
     
  4. Dzionik

    Dzionik Junior Member

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  5. Unmutual

    Unmutual Junior Member

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    The "stink bugs" we get in Louisiana, and pretty much the US look more like Michaelangelica's pic(shield bug). Your best bet is to ID the bug, then find out more information about it.
     
  6. brad_kl

    brad_kl Junior Member

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    Thanks for the suggestions.

    I'll certainly start with identifying it.
     
  7. brad_kl

    brad_kl Junior Member

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    It looks like they are Milkweed Nymphs
     
  8. pippimac

    pippimac Junior Member

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    Milkweed Nymph photos I saw had them as generally orange with a couple of black spots. Maybe I searched wrong, but I can't find your weird stripy bug online.
    Did you submit the photo to a 'name that bug' type forum?
     
  9. Benjy136

    Benjy136 Junior Member

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    Concerning the identifying of the stink bug:
    Not to be confused with the spined soldier bug, that has one sharp-looking point sticking out of each shoulder. (Podisus maculiventris) Nymph look similar to adults, but wingless. They attack caterpillars, grubs, sawfly larvae, and mexican bean beetle larvae. I've been unable, as yet, to put a picture up, but it looks so much like our stink bugs that I almost smooshed one. He's a good predator. The nymphs drink water or plant juices for just a short period then become predators adults live 5 to 8 weeks. Their total lifespan is around 11 to 16 weeks....................As a "last' resort for your stink bugs,dust with sabadilla dust.

    Ben
     

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